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pickguard plastic


drezdin
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Hi Guys.

As long as the material polishes out (seems like it would) is thick enough (.09 is pretty thick- you may want to use it at .06 or so).

There doesn't seem to be a reason it wouldn't work.

As long as you can sand it, and polish it and the pattern comes back up I say experiment first, and give it a shot.

there is never any harm in buying a piece, taking a half inch or so and seeing what happens on some scrap wood.

I use heavily patterned acrylics and platics all the time, and almost all have been succesfull.

Good luck.

Craig L

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In a kind of off topic way, I use pickgaurd material like that in the wooden pens I turn. I'll use the .90 thick tortise shell to make a custom center band, and I use b/w/b pickgaurd material to make a striped band running through the body of the pen.

When I'm done, I buff them out using the same buffer and compound I use on guitar finishes. You have to be carefull sanding the pickguard material, as it heats up when you sand at 3000rpm. I always wet sand mine. Don't know how that would work on a guitar, though. If you hand sanded, it would probably be ok.

Ok, I did use a piece of binding material for the stem of my vine inlay, that worked out great. I'd assume pickguards are made of the same stuff.

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here is what i was talking about.

http://www.warmoth.com/common/frames/pickguard.htm

celluloid and vinyl

At the bottom of that link it says, "Celluloid is a solvent based plastic and it tends to shrink over the years. Many vintage guitars are plagued with this phenomenon." So I would be worried about using celluloid as inlays and have them shrink over time. They say that the vinyl ones don't shrink though.

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I agree with saber.

I noticed that note when I first looked into it, but it didn't get mentioned in my post. Stay away from anything that shrinks or has a low melting temp, or hardness of less than maybe 2.5 or so on the MOHS hardness scale. Woods are O.K, but remember, they will get dirty fast, especially maple. Any attempts at sealing them will most likely not work either, as it will wear away.

Craig

Craig

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