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Type of mask for aerosol?


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You should have a better mask than that.. One that actually filters the contaminates, rather than block them. I have one of these:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?i...temnumber=G7870

It's cheap and it works GREAT! I wear it very often. You don't notice the differance until you take it off and almost gag since the air you've been standing in is so contaminated... It's really amazing. Pick one up!

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I use 3M brand same design as the grizzly. One point to mention, check the label on the paint you plan to use. I was involved in the boat building industry for a short while and learned some interesting facts. The finishing paint used on the fibreglass yacht I worked on contained isocyanates. They are a proven carcinogenic and my boss told me that there is NO form of protection from inhaling isocyanates aside from a self contained breathing unit.

And if you buy a Grizzly or 3M style mask read the instructions. The standard cartridge is charcoal based filter. I was told that after use the cartridges should be removed from the mask and stored in a separate plastic bag to prevent contamination. When fitting the mask make sure you have an airtight seal around your face. Hold the heel of your hand over the center air outlet and blow. If air escapes out the sides of the mask then cinch the straps tighter.

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aerosol aint that bad... I have a tiny room, a few meters by a few meters, and i do all my spraying in there, and then stay in there to play playstation 2 while it readies for next coat. That's not what you wanna hear, though. I would use something better, like those grizzlys.

But I wouldn't bother with a mask unless i painted more than once a month.

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aerosol aint that bad... I have a tiny room, a few meters by a few meters, and i do all my spraying in there, and then stay in there to play playstation 2 while it readies for next coat. That's not what you wanna hear, though. I would use something better, like those grizzlys.

But I wouldn't bother with a mask unless i painted more than once a month.

Ahh the young and foolish :D

Might not bother now, but wait a few years and see if the inside of your lungs are a funny shade of blue. I used to be like you, total indestructable and now I'm paying for it.

I generally use a SARS mask, not perfect, not particularly great but free.

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Ahh the young and foolish  :D

Amen, or as some guy said - "Ah, to be 17 again, when we were all 10 feet tall and indestructable".

Wear a mask.

Don't spray indoors in enclosed spaces.

Doing what you are doing is just begging to be poisoned or blown up, especially if you use electrical equipment in a room full of paint vapour and propellant, both of which are highly explosive when dispersed in air. At the very least you run the risk of developing a serious allergy to your chosen finish, and possibly any number of common household products as a side effect.

I know it's against the site policy to be rude, but I don't care in this case. Failing to follow the correct precautions when using dangerous materials makes you an idiot, endorsing your dangerous practices on a site where others could read it makes you an irresponsible moron.

Brian, apologies in advance if this breaches the sites terms, but I take serious exception to users here encouraging others to risk death or serious injury.

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Doing what you are doing is just begging to be poisoned or blown up, especially if you use electrical equipment in a room full of paint vapour and propellant, both of which are highly explosive when dispersed in air

As is sawdust (or nearly every type of dust for that matter). Open a window at least or it'll all end in :D (and a very big bang)

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Hi

I work for a company in the UK that sells masks of all types, in the UK there are 3 grades of disposable mask FFP1, FFP2, FFP3,

FFP1 is used for large dust particles and non toxic water based mists APF 4xOEL

FFP2 is used for fine dust particles, solid or liquid based aerosols APF 10xOEL

FFP3 is used for very fine dust particles, solid or liquid based aerosols APF 20xOEL

For spraying Cellulose lacquer a MINIMUM recomendation would be an FFP2 grade mask.

NOTE Disposable masks should only be used ONCE

Cartridge masks use the above grades and also come with specific use cartriges classed as follows.

A1 Organic vapours with boiling points greater than 65 centrigrade

A2 Organic vapours and gases

B1 Inorganic gases and vapours

AB1 Organic and inorganic gases and vapours

E1 Acid gases and vapours

K1 Ammonia and organic ammonia derivitives

ABEK1 Covers all of the above

Cartridges last for a MAXIMUM period of 1 month from first use, if you find breathing difficult you should change the cartridge.

For cellulose lacquers A1 or A2 would be used.

Paints with Isocyanates should be handled with care and you DO need an air fed full face resperator when spraying.

All spraying should be done in a well vented area as risk levels increase sharply as concentration builds up.

ALL masks and cartriges should be clearly marked with there grade if they are not the I would not buy.

I hope you dont mind me posting this as I feel it would be helpfull. I also dont know how applicable the grading system is to other countries outside the UK, but it at least gives people an idea as to the risks involved in spraying.

Alan

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Posted on Feb 13 2004, 12:55 AM

  aerosol aint that bad... I have a tiny room, a few meters by a few meters, and i do all my spraying in there, and then stay in there to play playstation 2 while it readies for next coat. That's not what you wanna hear, though. I would use something better, like those grizzlys.

But I wouldn't bother with a mask unless i painted more than once a month.

If i were you, I'd revise your thinking Ren...you can still aquire sensitisation to chemicals from fairly low exposure. I know a guy who became sensitised to a particular lachrymator(sp?), but it meant that he couldnt use anything like ammonia, or even peel an onion without his eyes streaming. Another person failed to wear the correct personal protective equipment and was sensitised to certain monomers (and after that, pretty much any organic compound). There are very few areas of chemistry these two people can now work in, its totally messed up their careers.

OK, that paragraph is *a bit* dramatic, but picture this, you mess your lungs up at a young age and cant spray anymore.

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Hi

I work for a company in the UK that sells masks of all types, in the UK there are 3 grades of disposable mask FFP1, FFP2, FFP3,

FFP1 is used for large dust particles and non toxic water based mists APF 4xOEL

FFP2 is used for fine dust particles, solid or liquid based aerosols APF 10xOEL

FFP3 is used for very fine dust particles, solid or liquid based aerosols APF 20xOEL

For spraying Cellulose lacquer a MINIMUM recomendation would be an FFP2 grade mask.

NOTE Disposable masks should only be used ONCE

Cartridge masks use the above grades and also come with specific use cartriges classed as follows.

A1 Organic vapours with boiling points greater than 65 centrigrade

A2 Organic vapours and gases

B1 Inorganic gases and vapours

AB1 Organic and inorganic gases and vapours

E1 Acid gases and vapours

K1 Ammonia and organic ammonia derivitives

ABEK1 Covers all of the above

Cartridges last for a MAXIMUM period of 1 month from first use, if you find breathing difficult you should change the cartridge.

For cellulose lacquers A1 or A2 would be used.

Paints with Isocyanates should be handled with care and you DO need an air fed full face resperator when spraying.

All spraying should be done in a well vented area as risk levels increase sharply as concentration builds up.

ALL masks and cartriges should be clearly marked with there grade if they are not the I would not buy.

I hope you dont mind me posting this as I feel it would be helpfull. I also dont know how applicable the grading system is to other countries outside the UK, but it at least gives people an idea as to the risks involved in spraying.

Alan

Now THAT is info I've been searching for a LONG time, mate. You rock! :DB)

Just by chance, do you know if this same classification system is used in the rest of Europe, too (specifically Germany, that is)?

so long

ace

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Hi

I think the standard applies across Europe as the masks are covered under EN149:2001 which is the currant European standard for respiritory protection.

I can give you information on various manufactures products but best known is probably 3M so if you see some of their masks in Germany drop me a line with the details and I can check out the grade for you.

Alan

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Cartridges last for a MAXIMUM period of 1 month from first use, if you find breathing difficult you should change the cartridge.

I was wondering about that. I have one of the grizzly masks, though by 3M, at work (I'm the finisher) and have been wondering about the cartridges. My boss said change them when you smell fumes or can't breathe easily. I've been using the originals that came with the mask for over three months, I guess I'll change them tomorrow.

Those things now kinda remind me of the carbon filters in my fish tank filter, which also only last for 1 month.

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