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Blackish.........sort of.


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13 hours ago, Drak said:

I never noticed how thick the body looked until one of the pics you just posted.

I would believe we're in for a Carve-a-geddon experience coming up.

 

7 hours ago, Bizman62 said:

Whew, I already thought I was seeing things!

It checks in at nearly three inches once all the parts are glued up. Parts of that cross section gets used somewhere but there won't be any one area that ends up much more that two inches thick and some, like the edge where the belly carve and forearm carve live that can be less than one inch thick.

So yeah, there is some serious shaping in her not to distant future.

SR

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8 hours ago, Muzz said:

Yep, I am sure there are a lot of us who are waiting in suspense to see what journey the carve is going to take this instrument on,

Cheers Muzz! While it is going to remove all traces of "slab", I don't think there will be any surprises......unless I get surprised too!

SR

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I built a cavity cover from the chunk of wood that I sliced the headstock cap off  of. And added magnets.DSC03702.JPG

Then commenced to shape the back.This was mostly done with a right angle grinder fitted with a flap disk and a long narrow sanding block to blend the curves.

DSC03704.JPGDSC03705.JPGDSC03706.JPGDSC03707.JPG

SR

 

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4 hours ago, Muzz said:

Using a chisel looks like such a great way of carving a top, it must be so satisfying to get that result with myosin and actin power.

As @ADFinlayson pointed out in his thread, chisels and gouges are not the most efficient way of carving a top. But I think they are the most enjoyable way, definitely satisfying. And along with your impressive dining room set, Muzz, you've got quite a sophisticated vocabulary, something I've noticed over the years.

Up here, we'd probably say the result was achieved (or will be) with elbow grease and sweat.

:)

SR

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On 7/19/2021 at 3:28 PM, ScottR said:

As @ADFinlayson pointed out in his thread, chisels and gouges are not the most efficient way of carving a top. But I think they are the most enjoyable way, definitely satisfying. And along with your impressive dining room set, Muzz, you've got quite a sophisticated vocabulary, something I've noticed over the years.

Up here, we'd probably say the result was achieved (or will be) with elbow grease and sweat.

:)

SR

Yes certainly is my preferred method, a lot harder to screw up than with power tools too :) 

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On 7/20/2021 at 12:28 AM, ScottR said:

As @ADFinlayson pointed out in his thread, chisels and gouges are not the most efficient way of carving a top. But I think they are the most enjoyable way, definitely satisfying. And along with your impressive dining room set, Muzz, you've got quite a sophisticated vocabulary, something I've noticed over the years.

Up here, we'd probably say the result was achieved (or will be) with elbow grease and sweat.

:)

SR

My grandfather got me interested in woodwork at a very young age, whenever we were working on something at some point he would say, could you do me a favour and duck out to the back shed and get me some elbow grease 😄 sometimes the requested object would be replaced with tartan paint or a round tuit :) 

11 hours ago, ADFinlayson said:

Yes certainly is my preferred method, a lot harder to screw up than with power tools too :) 

If I ever make a carved top that is definitely the way I want to do it :) 

 

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31 minutes ago, Muzz said:

My grandfather got me interested in woodwork at a very young age, whenever we were working on something at some point he would say, could you do me a favour and duck out to the back shed and get me some elbow grease 😄 sometimes the requested object would be replaced with tartan paint or a round tuit :) 

Round tuits get easier to find as your get older. Tartan paint is always going to be rare!

SR

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Thanks for sharing those idioms! The meaning of elbow grease was known to me although it never had occurred to me that it could uncommon for an English speaking child as well. Tartan paint translates to dotted paint in Finnish so that was logical. But I had to Google for a round tuit as I couldn't figure out the right pronounciation.

Back in the days when everything was done at the homestead, on butchering day kids were often sent to the neighbour to ask for a pig's tail straightener (or measuring tool) which unfortunately was just lent to another neighbour from whom it could be found etc. until the place was cleaned.

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On 7/22/2021 at 7:49 AM, Bizman62 said:

Thanks for sharing those idioms! The meaning of elbow grease was known to me although it never had occurred to me that it could uncommon for an English speaking child as well. Tartan paint translates to dotted paint in Finnish so that was logical. But I had to Google for a round tuit as I couldn't figure out the right pronounciation.

Back in the days when everything was done at the homestead, on butchering day kids were often sent to the neighbour to ask for a pig's tail straightener (or measuring tool) which unfortunately was just lent to another neighbour from whom it could be found etc. until the place was cleaned.

I get a big kick out how dedicated you are to work out all the idiosyncrasies of our language. I find it refreshing, entertaining and impressive all at once.

I'm pretty sure my grandfather had a pig's tail straightener.......at least he told me he did, back when I was a wee bairn visiting his farm.

SR

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2 minutes ago, ScottR said:

bairn

Yet another new word! That was an easy one, it's so close to the Swedish 'barn' and the context took care of the rest. How poor would the English language be without the Vikings!

I asked my daughter if she had learned about those while in London. One sent to get some elbow grease made her chuckle, tartan paint was new but immediately understood but a round tuit required a little explaining.

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5 minutes ago, Bizman62 said:

Yet another new word! That was an easy one, it's so close to the Swedish 'barn' and the context took care of the rest. How poor would the English language be without the Vikings!

I asked my daughter if she had learned about those while in London. One sent to get some elbow grease made her chuckle, tartan paint was new but immediately understood but a round tuit required a little explaining.

:D

Wee bairn is something a borrowed from colloquial Scots. I've never actually heard a Scotsman use it, but it's been used in many books I've read so I assume it's been used by actual Scots in a sentence.

In English barn is a building on a farm that holds tractors and hay and the like. That's where my grandfather told me he kept his pig's tail straightener.  I believed him because he'd occasionally have a pig with a straight tail.....

SR

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Yea I know about the barn houses, used as raw material for Barncasters etc.

Wikipedia told about 'bairn' been mostly used in Scotland which used to be in close contact with the Vikings. Many Scottish names, both for places and people, have a norse origin. I never had realized that until I read part of the Orkneyinga saga that was translated into Finnish. After that it was clear that names like 'Orkney' indeed are Old Norse which can somewhat be understood through Swedish. 'Ey' means 'island' even in current Icelandic. 'Orkn' can be understood as 'Orr's', Orr being the brother of Nor who on his part traveled along the Western Scandinavian fjords and thus gave name to 'Norway'...

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