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Dyed Danish Oil Finish


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In experimenting with dying Danish Oil last night I wound up with a color I really like that I'd like to move forward with. Given that I added dye to the Danish Oil do I need to treat it at all to lock in the color before I move forward with lacquer or poly? I want to make sure to retain the color for sure. I really like the look and would like to preserve it as much as possible. Thanks!

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I've gone with lacquer over Danish oil successfully in the past. You do need to make sure the oil has completely cured/dried. Give it a couple of week or more before spraying, depending how open the pores were and how much oil soaked in how deep.

SR

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no expert but anytime you hear "oil" followed by "lacquer/clear" - had at least better make sure you do some tests.  i know tru oil is pretty forgiving in this regard but it's not really oil.

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1 minute ago, ScottR said:

I've gone with lacquer over Danish oil successfully in the past. You do need to make sure the oil has completely cured/dried. Give it a couple of week or more before spraying, depending how open the pores were and how much oil soaked in how deep.

SR

well surprise - I'm wrong.  I did some danish on my first bass and it was such a waxy feel... wouldn't have guessed that it would be anything but trouble with clear over it.  I stand corrected.

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8 minutes ago, mistermikev said:

well surprise - I'm wrong.  I did some danish on my first bass and it was such a waxy feel... wouldn't have guessed that it would be anything but trouble with clear over it.  I stand corrected.

Danish has many formulas but most of them are similar to Tru-oil, in that it is boiled linseed oil and mineral spirits.....and probably something else- and definitely in different ratios. It is intended to harden below the surface of the wood, ie in the pores. If one were trying to leave enough on the surface for a film build-up, I would be hesitant to spray anything over it. Mu success was with the soak and wipe completely off type Danish oil finish.  You advise about testing first is valuable and should not be ignored.

SR

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1 minute ago, ScottR said:

Danish has many formulas but most of them are similar to Tru-oil, in that it is boiled linseed oil and mineral spirits.....and probably something else- and definitely in different ratios. It is intended to harden below the surface of the wood, ie in the pores. If one were trying to leave enough on the surface for a film build-up, I would be hesitant to spray anything over it. Mu success was with the soak and wipe completely off type Danish oil finish.  You advise about testing first is valuable and should not be ignored.

SR

well oddly, in the case of that bass... in all the places where it was walnut the oil soaked in fine... but on that mappa burl top... it really sat near the surface and as i mentioned left it sort of waxy.  I imagine I could have gone clear over the walnut w/o much trouble but that mappa... doubtful.  I did whipe it after... but apparently not enough.

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Posted (edited)

Sounds like with ample dry time (no problem) I shouldn't have to worry about a sealer. I am really liking the results from the danish oil so I think that's the direction I'm headed.

Thanks again!

Edited by jmkratt
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If your Danish Oil is similar to Tru-Oil then you should not have any worries. However, if in doubt, shellac works between most any finish.

Just so you know, Tru-Oil and the likes are actually oil based varnishes, a blend of boiled linseed oil, varnish and turpentine. The proportions vary according to the purpose but in any case you should be able to apply more of the varnish/lacquer/poly/whatever-you-call-it of same type - you'd just be changing the proportions from penetrative to building. And if you let it dry properly, any poly/clearcoat should do.

That said, if the surface feels oily I'd at least wipe it clean with alcohol or some other grease removing solvent and let dry properly after that.

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