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just thought I'd pass this one... using locating pins instead of a bit for tiling...


mistermikev
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so... recently read and re-read @curtisa's thread about tiling a fretboard with cnc.  (thanks for that!)  Full disclosure - also got a lot of help from @MiKro.  Well I did the tiling and I don't have anything precision to measure out quite that far but via tape measure it looks good.  smashing. 

so... as curtisa suggested I used my cnc bits as the pins to locate the piece... and while this is a great idea... I felt like I wanted to use the butt end of them because there would be less chance of wobble... and that means pulling them back out with my fingers and risking a cut... or pulling them with a pliers and risking damaging the knifes.  Further, my shorter 1/4 bits are really only 1.75" total... and going through 1/4 fretboard + 3/4" slide board + 1/4" depth of cut for location hole... doesn't leave much.  I also wanted to scratch/mark them so I can be sure of the depth - but not doing that on my bits...

so with that in mind I figured I'd take a chance on the precision of the steel locating pins I could buy off amazon.  

well... bought them and checked them against the holes I cut with my whiteside bit and they are perfect... just wanted to pass on in case anyone else can benefit - link below.  $13.49 for 10 pins and money well spent.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B086DCHYQK?psc=1&ref=ppx_yo2ov_dt_b_product_details

 

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Good to know :thumb:. Yes - I was aware of premade locating pins for this kind of thing.

My original idea of using bits as locating pins was to use old, broken ones and insert them backwards (ie, shank down). As a fellow amateur computerised wood dust generator, like me you've probably destroyed plenty of bits on your way to learning the ropes on the machine.  A 1/8" shank bit in a 1/8" hole has no wobble, and it doesn't mater that the bit is broken - you can be as rough as you like putting them in or out of the holes if the cutting edges are already no good.

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5 hours ago, curtisa said:

Good to know :thumb:. Yes - I was aware of premade locating pins for this kind of thing.

My original idea of using bits as locating pins was to use old, broken ones and insert them backwards (ie, shank down). As a fellow amateur computerised wood dust generator, like me you've probably destroyed plenty of bits on your way to learning the ropes on the machine.  A 1/8" shank bit in a 1/8" hole has no wobble, and it doesn't mater that the bit is broken - you can be as rough as you like putting them in or out of the holes if the cutting edges are already no good.

hehe computerised wood dust generator lols.

I was not aware that you could buy locating pins... I guess forrest for the trees.

I have yet to break anything above 1/8" bits (have def ruined a number of .0236 bits!)... and was going with 1/4" bcuz the 1/8" bits I have would be entirely too short to make it through the necc 1 1/2" and have enough sticking out that I could grab.  the other concern was... the bits were going in tight enough that getting them out by the blade was going to result in a cut finger sooner or later.  I guess if I had some old ones I wouldn't be concerned about pulling them back out with a pliers tho. 

I probably should have some old ones by now but cleaned up my one 'older' whiteside the other day with some saw blade cleaner and it doesn't tear out at all even on hard woods so... she's got plenty of life yet. 

Either way these will be great cause I can mark them at depth easily and pretty cheap.  2" long so plenty sticking out to grab.

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Been using steel pins for years Mike. I have 1/4" mainly. you just have to make sure they are not in the way of any cuts as a router bit will suffer big time if it hits it. If an end mill hits it it may or may not do well depending on DOC, end mill type ,  etc. LOL.

It is good info to know though.

MK

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17 minutes ago, MiKro said:

Been using steel pins for years Mike. I have 1/4" mainly. you just have to make sure they are not in the way of any cuts as a router bit will suffer big time if it hits it. If an end mill hits it it may or may not do well depending on DOC, end mill type ,  etc. LOL.

It is good info to know though.

MK

hehe, funny you mention that.  I had great concerns about hitting them while moving my machine around manually... perhaps forgetting and wham!  Having lived throught the "put a 1/4 endmill through my aluminum truss rod event of 2022"... I don't want to be anywhere near if/when that sort of thing happens.  the funny thing is... the whiteside bit I did that with - totally fine.   That is the one I just cleaned and am still using for everything.  Aircraft grade aluminum - cut that truss in half like nothing! 

I actually use nylon nuts/bolts and T-slots in my spoil board to hold my stuff down, so I just use the pins to get into position and then tighten down my bolts and remove the pins... but thank you for the thought!  not sure my whiteside would fair as well against steel!😵

 

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