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Truss Rod


STAHLER
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I was also looking into making my own truss rod. Probably will on my next guitar. I'm building a 5-string bass with a very thin neck, I used a U-shaped rod in it like your "truss rod 2" link also with two carbon fiber rods.

That truss rod is in my opinion much better suited for a thin neck. The other one will not leave enough wood at the back of the neck once you've shaped it.

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I was also looking into this a while back. Decided that life is too short to make your own truss rod and I'd be much better off parting with a fiver. :D

I agree with Phil, the U shaped one would be best for a thin neck.

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In that case you need someone with more knowledge than me :D .

Sorry dude, don't think I can help, but there's LOADS of people about here that will actually know for sure. Hope it goes well. Are you in Manchester? Bet it's raining B)

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Stahler,

The U channel truss rod I used is from a company called ABM. It's in reality a square channel one, not U. So, yes, you can use a square channel. In my truss rod, though, there is tape that was wound around the rod itself in the middle of the lenght of the rod. This makes it bend backwards easier (or so the luthier that sold it to me said) He also mentioned that I should install the rod "with the open side of the channel again the neck wood. (facing downwards from the fretboard)

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if you wanted to have a local metal shop make some dual action rods, what type of steel would you have to use for the best results? other then just "hard" steel, what strength specifically would i need, i want to try and get some rods made with that side adjustment tool that gotoh used to make

??

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Mild steel should be fine. The rod is either under compresion or tension depending on the design and needs to be able to bend slightly. So using anything too hard like tool steel is counterproductive. You may want to use a piece of stainless if you're worried about corrosion.

Keith

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Theres a company out there (the bloke who runs it had something to do with Fender) who route the centre laminate of the neck and install a truss rod before glueing the laminates together. Someone gave me the link when I was looking at doing my own rod. Looks like a good way to go about it.

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Its a wonderful design. They also leave the two halves for awhile before planing them and glueing them, so if there were any "hidden tensions" within that piece, they'll show themselves once it's been cut in half. It's more stable than a one piece I think.

There were some old peavey necks where they just took 2 seperate pieces of maple and joined them down the middle. That was dumb. I mean you could have the treble piece warping into a backbow while the bass piece was in an S curve because you couldn't use the truss rod properly to get the neck straight. Each piece had a mind of it's own. I think it has to be the same piece so you are matching density and grain direction. And you can't flip one of the pieces around. That's almost asking for a twist. On a three piece neck you can flip the middle piece because its flanked by those other two, and its symmetrical.

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I asked our structural engineering department what steel would be best. The reply was: Tool steel is way to hard, the best would be spring steel if you need very high tension. It's designed to bend. Tool steel is designed to resist wear but will chip easily. (A bit like diamond, won't wear easily but a sharp blow with a hammer and you've got diamond dust)

Keith

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I bought the stuff to make the "truss rod 1" linked at the begining of this thread. Has anyone made one of these? I understand how to make the truss rod itself but have a couple of questions:

1) Can the rod be put in the opposite direction than what is shown in the picture. In other words, can the adjustment nut be at the peghead?

2) Can the routed channel be straight depth wise or should it be curved (deeper in the middle)?

Anyone?

Thanks,

Mike

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I think it has to be the same piece so you are matching density and grain direction. And you can't flip one of the pieces around. That's almost asking for a twist. On a three piece neck you can flip the middle piece because its flanked by those other two, and its symmetrical.

Incorrect. You MUST flip one of the pieces in a two piece neck, cut from a single pice of wood.

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