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Fretboard radius


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Then take the compound radius....it's just better for two reasons:

1. You have a nice tight radius at the nut for chording work etc., but a much flatter radius at the heel, so that your bends don't die and you can pull of the faster sweeping licks much easier

2. The compound radius if executed properly allows for the lowest action possible without getting fret buzz and dying bendings

Very important is that your nut has the radius of the fingerboard at the nut and that the bridge lies on the cone defined by the start and end radius of the fingerboard. Warmoth does not aim for these criteria and in my opinion a compound radius board can only be of real advantage if these criteria are met.

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Very important is that your nut has the radius of the fingerboard at the nut and that the bridge lies on the cone defined by the start and end radius of the fingerboard. Warmoth does not aim for these criteria and in my opinion a compound radius board can only be of real advantage if these criteria are met.

Two things

I assume you can just file the underside of the nut to match the radius?

I'm not sure what you mean by 'making sure the bridge lies on cone'

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So the bridge has to follow the same radius as the heel of the neck? (i dont think i have that right, please help a fool!)

No. Imagine a cone. It has different radii everywhere. It starts with the biggest radius which is the bottom surface of the cone and the the radii get smaller and smaller towards the tip of the cone. The radius of the fingerboard at the nut and the different radius of the fingerboard at the heel together with the fingerboard taper define a cone. The bridge has to have a radius that is bigger then the radius at the end of the fingerboard because it is nearer to the bottom of the cone and as we said before the radius increases towards the bottom. It's really kinda hard to get across what I mean with actually talking and without pictures, but I hope you understand me now.....

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yes, maestro has a point, i think nyjbkim worked out the proper birdge radius for a 10"-16" compound neck as 19" something.... so that kind of limits your bridge options to a strat style hardtail, since tune-o's aren't made that flat, and trem's aren't either, but the saddles on the bridge can be shimmed to get the desired radius

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Nope, wasn't me... but I do remember that post :D.

Edit: Ok, found that thread here.

my appologies,

Just for laughs I jumped into AutoCad (easier than math in this case) and found size for radius of bridge as asked.

Assume, 25 1/2" scale, 10" at nut, and 16" at 18.75" from nut this results in about 18.16" radius at bridge. Of course since the bridge for each string is at a different distance from nut this isn't really a true number but gives you an idea, again just for laughs.

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