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Kiln Dried wood.. ?


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Kiln dried isn't necessary... but it takes about a year for each inch thickness to air dry, I believe (month per inch for kiln, iirc.) You'd want 6 to 8 percent moisture content.

Welcome to PG! :D

Good luck!

Most kiln dried only gets it to around 12%. If your lucky, you might find some around 10% If you want it any drier, you have to store it yourself for a long time.

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when we are talking about moisture content in the wood...aren't we talking about .....uhhh...how to word it...the natural moisture of the tree...like what makes it "green"

otherwise anytime you steamed a top to bend it you would have redry it for months,right?

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when we are talking about moisture content in the wood...aren't we talking about .....uhhh...how to word it...the natural moisture of the tree...like what makes it "green"

otherwise anytime you steamed a top to bend it you would have redry it for months,right?

Right...we're talking about the moisture content of the cells themselves I think. When you steam the wood the individual cells don't reconstitute (bad word) I wouldn't imagine. :D

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So far we just have been getting our wood kiln dried locally. But someone once told me that you could put the wood in your attic and it would dry alot quicker than any other method except running it in a kiln. I haven't felt the need to do that yet, but the person I get to kiln dry takes his time and does two runs on it, instead of only one. He claims it's better on the wood doing it this way and gets it to the right moisture level safely. Not really sure if that's true, but just what has been told to me.

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So far we just have been getting our wood kiln dried locally. But someone once told me that you could put the wood in your attic and it would dry alot quicker than any other method except running it in a kiln. I haven't felt the need to do that yet, but the person I get to kiln dry takes his time and does two runs on it, instead of only one. He claims it's better on the wood doing it this way and gets it to the right moisture level safely. Not really sure if that's true, but just what has been told to me.

I store all my wood in the rafters of my workshop. It gets extremely hot up there in summer, and is warm in winter. I pull the timber down a month before i need to use it. I buy everything kiln dried (in the country of origin), and it takes 3 months minimum to get to me. Last time i worked it out, ive got four years worth of timber in storage, and i buy new bits every time i start a guitar (so my stash never runs out).

Two goes through the kiln are better than one. That wat they can give it some moderate temp, before heating up for the second go. Thank your lucky stars you have a guy that does this.Drying too quickly causes surface tension, cracks, splits, etc etc. As soon as you machine the timber (dried too quickly), it will spring into a bow/warp/cup.

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I store all my wood in the rafters of my workshop. It gets extremely hot up there in summer, and is warm in winter. I pull the timber down a month before i need to use it. I buy everything kiln dried (in the country of origin), and it takes 3 months minimum to get to me. Last time i worked it out, ive got four years worth of timber in storage, and i buy new bits every time i start a guitar (so my stash never runs out).

Two goes through the kiln are better than one. That wat they can give it some moderate temp, before heating up for the second go. Thank your lucky stars you have a guy that does this.Drying too quickly causes surface tension, cracks, splits, etc etc. As soon as you machine the timber (dried too quickly), it will spring into a bow/warp/cup.

That's great to hear. He seems like a very honest person, so I really didn't question his knowledge any, but still great to hear that I'm getting the wood done the correct way. Oh.. By the way, do you know how long it would normally take to dry by storing it in the attic or in the rafters of a shop area alone?

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That's great to hear. He seems like a very honest person, so I really didn't question his knowledge any, but still great to hear that I'm getting the wood done the correct way. Oh.. By the way, do you know how long it would normally take to dry by storing it in the attic or in the rafters of a shop area alone?

One year, for every inch. If you live in a cold climate, double that.

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.. As soon as you machine the timber (dried too quickly), it will spring into a bow/warp/cup.

the maple i get locally always seems to do this when i cut it on my table saw.... it always gets all twisted when i try and rip, let's say a neck blank, into a couple of peices to laminate it..... every other kind of wood stays pretty much the same (gotta love the stability of PH B) ) either maple is just funky around here.. i need a new blade.... or the local warehouse only dries it once... :D

and about what wes said...... so once the cells are dry, you can soak a 1/2" thick peice of wood in hot water for like 20 minutes to bend it...... then how long would it take to dry?? a week? a month? a day? this has always been kinda grey area for me..

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and about what wes said...... so once the cells are dry, you can soak a 1/2" thick peice of wood in hot water for like 20 minutes to bend it...... then how long would it take to dry?? a week? a month? a day? this has always been kinda grey area for me..

Not long at all.

think of it like new concrete. Takes a day to dry out, two to fully cure, but chuck a hose on it and it will dry out in an hour.

The moisture gets into the wood, but it doesnt bond with it, its not part of the tree, unlike the ORIGINAL moisture, that is/was part of the tree.

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