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about StewMac's fretboard scale


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Hello, I ordered a gibson 24 3/4" scale fingerboard from StewMac and I have a question: they said that it is based on a 24 9/16" scale Gibson uses, but when I measured the distance of the frets from the nut it seems more like a 24 9/16" than a 24 3/4" scale (acording to Hiscock book's measurements, I measured the 12th, 16th and the 22th frets from the nut and it seem to be 24 9/16" not 24 3/4"), am I wrong?. I´m having trouble locating the bridge- please tell me what scale use: the 24 3/4" or the 24 9/16", thanks a lot.

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In the Benedetto book he says something about the actual measurement of the scale being a little bit different than stated. But I'm at the office now...I'll try to look it up when I get home.

That being said, the measurements on all my Fenders are exactly 12-3/4" from nut to center of the 12th fret (i.e. 25.5" exactly). They seem to work OK.

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That's what Stewmac say on their site: the real scale is actually 24 9/16

At least that's what I read.

You read correctly, and I quote Stewie Macdaddy:

"Gibson's standard 24-3/4" scale is a compensated length based on a true scale of about 24-9/16". Our fret spacing matches Gibson's most common spacing. Many Gibsons have other scale lengths — measure your guitar before ordering! For 20-fret necks, simply cut off the two highest slots. "

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I'm sure this will bring clarity to the situation.

To quote Bob Benedetto (p. 190)... :D

"Position the bridge on the guitar so that the center of the saddle is a distance of 25-1/8" from the nut. 25-1/8" represents the total of the 25" fingerboard scale used in this text and 1/8" string compensation. (As the strings are pressed to make contact with the frets, they are also stretched. This stretching will cause the guitar to play sharp. The additional 1/8" compensates for the stretched strings and allows the instrument to intonate properly.)

Or, in other words, what Wes said.

So, it sounds to me that you should place the bridge 24-3/4" from the nut (i.e. DON'T measure from the 12th fret, or any other fret). The board already compensates.

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Thanks a lot for all your replies. Now I get it; see my first language isn´t English so I got confused because it says in the name of the product "Gibson 24 3/4"scale fingerboard". Now I understand that the fretboard has the 24 9/16" scale but I need to place the lower E side of the bridge 24 3/4" for compensation, right? You have helped me a lot, thanks you all.

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Im reading now from the Melvyn Hiscock boock and it says about compensation:

"The amount of compensation needed depends upon a number of factors including action,string thickness and string tension. For a low action and light strings very little compensation might be required on the treble side of a bridge although up to 3 mm might be needed depenting on the setup. THe bass side will need approximately 3 - 4 mm more...This adjustment is usually well within the limits of the bridge"

As you see you dont really need to worry that much about it..the bridge can be ajusted to that compentation.

Just for the sake of conversation Im planing these things at this time and I made a post about bridges. The hipshot that was mentionted alows a span of 6.3mm of adjustment so it prety much covers the worst case scenario.

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I saw the hipshot bridge and yeah, you have room for compensation. I´m using a tunomatic & stop tailpiece, but I still think I can manage some changes. I discovered that I messed up with the plans so now I can correct them.

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