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Hey Brian..


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Hey Brian...

It occurred to me while I was basking in my new "inlay artist" status.. :D

That I could make a mini-tutorial with the jellyfish knife regarding how I deal with relatively hard variable curves during an inlay. It's advanced. It's also the same process for dealing with guitar tops, and even radiused fretboards that require big images. Can I send you some pics?

My guy isn't around to post them on my site.

Thanks

Craig..

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It will help with almost any curves, although for extreme curves like the ones you are talking about you really just need to either crack, or determin the cut points for the materials you are using so they don't break unevenly. Most inlayers just do purflings around curves like that, and let the breaks fall naturally.

I am going to show you how to inlay on a variable curved piece by determining the maximum "flat" zone of the shell, how to "curve" synthetics, and how to position everything prior to routing on a curve so the pieces match the curve upon pieceing it all together. You should know how to inlay already. It's definitly advanced. I spend most of my time during these inlays just working out the logistics, staring at it some more and then moving forward.

Craig

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Clavin, that would be an invaluable resource. I am trying to find good information on basic inlays, and the projectguitar one Brian posted is good, however I would love more angles to work with, and different viewpoints. Right now I am not comfortable enough to go ahead with Brians method, and even though my first inlay jobs might be as simple as changing my dots to blocks on my LP, I want to do it right!

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this tut won't help you...what he's talking about is very advanced. That is, inlaying on curved surfaces. Inlay is not something that is extremely easy. Even changing dots to blocks will prove to be very challenging if it is you first inlay attempt. Just take your time and it should work well. The only book I know on the subject is Larry Robinson's "The Art of Inlay". Well worth the cash.

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O.K.

I will first thing after I'm done with the Gibson crowns, the scribing and routing for the jelly knife, and the two truss covers I need to cut ( busy day tomorrow is!!)

Speaking of- why are we up so late??

:D

Craig

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