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    Prostheta

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    Andyjr1515

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/16/2021 in all areas

  1. Now I had to find a veneer to cover the bevel. First I needed to make a template. I stuck a piece of paper onto the bevel using repositionable spray adhesive and traced the outline with a pencil. A few years ago I made a bass ukulele (not the one further up this thread, another one) but only had guitar-size back and side sets, which left me with some large rosewood off-cuts. I stuck my tracing onto an off-cut and cut it out leaving about 3 mm all round. I sanded the veneer down to about 1.25 mm thick (flexible enough to bend easily around the bevel) and it’s ready to be glued on. Gluing the veneer onto the body was rather stressful the other time I did it. It has to be bent round the bevel and taped in place whilst it’s trying to slither around because of the glue and if I don’t get it lined up properly and the glue starts to grab I’m in a mess, so I thought of a way to try to make sure that didn’t happen . I used my paper template to trace the outline of the bevel on the inside of the veneer. Then I stuck 5 little blocks of softwood cut at 45° onto the veneer with just a tiny dab of glue. These should enable me to position the veneer on the bevel perfectly (I hope!) Hope there’s enough tape on there. Fingers crossed. Tape off. It looks to be OK. After some VERY careful trimming, especially at each end where the veneer tapers down to nothing, with spokeshave, chisels and cabinet scraper it looked like this.
    7 points
  2. Purple Hummingbird This is my second build, a long nights and weekends garage project. I was inspired by the PRS Special Semi Hollow and the PRS Northern Lights color scheme. I really pushed myself in this second build after completing a simpler one last year. I loved the process of building this guitar with its curvy features, and experimenting with the color scheme until I got to a satisfactory results. The Hummingbird is light, beautiful, very playable and sounds great! Body: Semi-hollow body, quilted maple front and back with a mahogany core. Neck: Quilted maple. 25" scale, Madagascar Rosewood fretboard, 10" radius with Abalone inlays. Quilted maple headstock with a hummingbird inlay. Pickups: Bridge and Neck Paul Reed Smith 85/15, and a Seymour Duncan SL59-1 in the middle Controls: Volume, Tone, Coil tap switches for Neck and Bridge pickups, and a 5-way rotary switch. PRS locking tuners and PRS Stoptail bridge
    6 points
  3. Thanks! Bit more progress - other than a bit of invisible fill of one of the knot holes (easy with ebony), the carve is pretty much done on the half fitted so far. It's a very subtle curve but, certainly in real life, transforms it from the previous 'slab topped' look. I'm happy with this. I also drilled the bridge earth wire hole while I could see what I was doing. Oh, and the ebony fretboard blank arrived this morning!
    6 points
  4. I totally agree, sponged sounds so much better, and it suits the action of rubbing the guitar down with bendy backed sandpaper, "I sponged the neck into shape', First go at a logo,
    5 points
  5. The head profile was then cut slightly oversize on the bandsaw. The grain of the maple veneers is so squirrely that it chips out very easily so I took the head down to its final shape on the spindle sander. Here’s the final shape. I had to cut that hole to get access to the truss rod and it had to be that big because it’s a double acting rod and the nut is lower in the neck than the normal Fender one and I need room to be able to turn the Allen key. But the more I look at it, the less I like it, so I decided to make a cover for it. I started by milling a slot the size of the hole but longer. Then I made a rosewood bung to fill the hole. It conforms to the curve of the headstock but it’s a little bit proud of the hole (about 1mm) as it needs a bit of clearance to be able to get it out easily and it looks nicer if it’s a bit proud than if it was flush. If you’ve been following this thread you’ll know how to get it out to adjust the truss rod. Press one end down and the other end comes up and you flip it out. It’s held in place by two small neodymium magnets and the opposite end from the magnets is bevelled.
    5 points
  6. The Annapolitan Elephant Built in my laundry room/shop, its my third build overall -- and the first bass attempt. Full 34" scale length with a Musicman style pickup. Since I'm a novice and still figuring out the basics I used mostly generic/non-name hardware and spent most of the budget on more tools. Despite the "affordable" parts I think it sounds great, surprisingly bright. The body & headstock shapes are my own design, refined from my "Teetotaler" guitar design. The overall specs match pretty closely with a modern Fender P-bass - my interests are more in aesthetic design and the woodworking rather than trying to trail-blaze new, ground-breaking specs. No chance of me stumbling on that anyway. Ash body, maple neck and fingerboard, with walnut inlays. Body is stained using Rit Golden-yellow dye and finished with Minwax polycrylic clear gloss. The neck and fretboard are finished with TruOil. The build thread is here: Thanks for checking it out!
    4 points
  7. Hi everyone, This is my guitar, Ulysses. It's named after the electric blue butterflies of the same name that live in the past of Australia I grew up in, North Queensland. It's the first build I've done completely on my own (I've done one before in a 5 day course) It's got 2 custom wound P-90, humbucker sized pickups made by a chap in Perth, Western Australia. There's a Schaller Signum bridge, Gotoh locking tuners and a 25" scale length. All the timbers are Australian; Tasmanian Blackwood for the main body, Tasmanian Oak for the front, Queensland maple on the neck and an aussie something something that I can't remember what it was for the fret board. I became a dad at the start of 2020, and had my normal share of adjustment headaches and stresses that everyone gets with being a first time parent, plus throwing in the pandemic and some unfavourable work changes and my mental health was starting to struggle a bit towards the middle of 2020. I decided to start on a guitar again to give myself something just for me to focus on; and something I'd dreamt of doing again 5 years after the course. The guitar was built over about 15 months by nibbling away during afternoon naps, evenings and the odd afternoon on a weekend. Here is a link to my build thread.
    4 points
  8. recycled rosewood table leg
    4 points
  9. I'm fairly chuffed with the figure and the burst. SR
    4 points
  10. Thanks, folks And it's a bit further on. I invested in a cheaper (affordable) competitor to the LMI binding cutting rig. The rubber band is one of my mods : I will cut the binding slot in the top when the ebony has been glued and carved. I've also cut the neck blank after much deliberation of measurements, angles, etc. I added a maple pinstripe to this too: And have done, of course, a gratuitous mock-up. Bear in mind that the top is still oversize (the chalk marks are the actual size): It's going to be pretty!
    4 points
  11. My fourth build, "the Ochre Owl" or "Carrot", can't decide which is better. 25.5" scale superstrat Ash body, flame maple top, flame maple control cover, ebony board, Schaller tuners and bridge, EMG 85/60, pretty normal stuff. Satin oil finish, alcohol dyes. Started building guitars thanks to having extra time on my hands since the apocalypse happened. I run a small indie record label and put up my work shop in the label stock room. I'm building two of these right now, this one's mine, another one, a green version on the way for a friend. I used JEM templates for the body, and some inspiration from Blackmachine. Haven't done a tilted headstock or bound fretboards before, it went pretty well I'd say! Definitely will be doing these more. Neck profile is stolen from ESP, board is 10"-14" compound radius. Build thread Sound (and visuals):
    4 points
  12. The area around the toggle switch is quite small and to fit a regular lp style cover plate would be a risky route and by the time I've done the roundover, there won't be much material there which will be more difficult when it comes to levelling the finish with increased risk of sanding through so I thought I'd go rogue with the control cover.
    3 points
  13. Dots would be quite an intrusive addition. Perhaps screws would just be a minor faux pas by comparison?
    3 points
  14. one of those little details... not entirely sure it's worth it alone but perhaps when combined with everything else it will have greater value... spent a lot of time on this! same maple used for the fretboard and sm sonoran turquoise as the rest of the inlays... volume, mode and boost.
    3 points
  15. As I’d decided to use this nice maple top, I wanted to cover as little of it up as possible, so no pick guard, no control plate and if possible, no metal parts showing on the front, not even screws. Leo designed the original Teles with a bridge cover, so I decided to make one. I don’t think mine will become an ashtray as it will be made of wood, although it will be removable. I first cut a piece of rosewood with a 2mm x 2mm rebate, cut it into sections and mitred the ends. Glued the frame together with CA. If the mitred faces are flat and smooth it makes quite a strong joint. I did a trial run and it took quite a bit of force to break the joint. The piece of pine is clamped down so it can’t move and it’s also holding down a piece of backing paper from double sided adhesive tape. I apply a drop of thin CA to one of the pieces of EIR, push the sharp end of both against the pine, and bring them together. In a few seconds they are glued. With the frame glued up (I forgot to take a photo) I thinned an off-cut from the top to a little over 2mm and cut a piece slightly larger than the aperture in the frame. I carefully sanded the edges on a sanding beam (This is half of a builder’s straight edge (square aluminium tube about 2 metres long) with 80 grit abrasive stuck to it. I find I use it for all sorts of things) . ... until it just fit into the rebate. I then ran some thin CA round the inside to glue it in place. Made a cut-out in the front for the strings... ... and another for the bridge plate, as the front of the bridge will be flush with the cover. The cover is held in place by small neodymium magnets. It’s a Gotoh hardtail bridge and the six in a row hold onto the intonation screw heads and the other two onto the two front bridge fixing screws. Although the cover looked OK on the drawing, it looked rather bulky and not very refined in reality, so it got modified later, as you’ll see. It was made so it doesn’t actually touch the body, so can be put on and taken off without marking the top.
    3 points
  16. I still have stuff to sort before both tops can be fitted but, even if a switch needed fitting on the bass side, there is nothing I can't do with that one glued on...so that's what I've done. And out comes the radius dish again to clamp against After a few experiments with ebony offcut, I decided that the block plane was probably the safest and most effective way of carving the ebony: But yes - it's a slow process. Lots of 'walk away and come back to it'; lots of 'resharpen the blade comprehensively b******d by the b*****ing ebony' This, I reckon is about 1/3 of the way there. By the way, I've dampened it to give a better idea of how the colours will coordinate on the finished guitar ref @Charlie H 72 's post. Looks especially nice in real life I won't fit the bottom binding until the tops - particularly the edges - are done, otherwise there is a tendency to sand down at each stage until you realise you've run out of walnut! And the fretboard blank is due later today! Happy days!
    3 points
  17. Oh yes, and my workmate bench loves to crawl under the wood I am cutting with a jigsaw into that path! Hope you had a lovely holiday, I have made a bit of progress, heading towards my favourite process, carving the neck. I use the bottom of the line as the signal to stop, it is 3 mm deep in at that point, the fret tangs are 2.3 mm, should be all OK, it'll soon be time to pound some frets! I started drilling the MOP dot holes with a 6 mm brad point then before getting too deep I swapped over to a bit where the spike has been filed down. Put some epoxy in the holes and popped the dots in.
    3 points
  18. Bit more progress on this. Before adding the tops, I have a few jobs to do. One is cutting and binding the diamond f holes. I used a scrollsaw to rough cut them and made a little sharp-angled sanding block to get them straight: Then cut some maple binding strip to line them: Life is too short to feed stuff through the f holes, especially as this is going to have Jaguar-type sliding switches and so I will have a small access hatch at the back to be able to feed stuff in and hold in place while screws, etc, are being tightened: I thought I'd do something similar to the grain-matched hatch on the recent bass-build: I started by cutting the hatch out using a Dremel, precision base and 1mm bit: Then added a rebate at the back that will also hold the magnets: Finally, lined the hole with some maple veneer (I did the iron-on trick as I do when I veneer guitar and bass bodies, ie: coat both parts with PVA wood glue; let dry; position and iron on inch at a time; hold until cool and glue grabs): Finally, trimmed with a single-edged razor: There will also be a 1.5mm pinstripe between the wings and the neck so hopefully it will all visually tie up together
    3 points
  19. Speaking of which, here's today's work so far. 13deg scarfing jig (I decided to stay with 13deg as it has a different "reveal" of the truss rod access cavity than 11deg) set up on the table saw. The pieces were cut at 40mm, 80mm and finally 120mm blade height. Being a rip saw, the surface finish is not what I'd call adequate for glueup straight from parting like this. A tap with the hammer on the back of the clamped piece allows for a slow steady pass to be taken at a fraction of a mm which is perhaps okay for glueup. If it's not airtight, it can be better. I didn't get photos of this process, however the neck portion of this blankk (I made three) was split into 30mm, 20mm and about 50mm. I cleaned up each part with a thickness planer to a mm under those sizes. The central laminate was tapered on the jointer using the same sort of technique I've described previously years back. Set the jointer cutting depth to half of the difference from one end to the other, cut the piece halfway from the desired thin end first and stop when the cutter head's top dead centre is at the halfway mark. Reverse the piece back to front and tip the front end up, pivoting off that halfway cut. Cut this over the jointer to achieve the required taper differential, and take finish passes until the whole piece is at the right final sizing. In my case it was 16mm to 11mm, so I set the jointer at (16-11)/2 or 2,5mm depth of cut. Those two passes left the part about 19mm at the body end (as it came out of the thickness planer) and 14mm at the headstock end. The process wasn't as perfect as I've described it here, so the finish passes were a combination of fine tuning and final sizing. Generally this works quite well, but I did set myself very specific dimensions to hit, and I'd be disappointed in myself if I did half a job....
    3 points
  20. It also looks good in cream-white....muuuurrgghhhhhh
    3 points
  21. No problems about hijacking. Communication is what forums are all about. Wait and see . . . won't be long.
    3 points
  22. So, that was all the bits and pieces made. All that was left was to apply finish and screw them all together. I say ‘all ‘. Finishing is my ‘bête noire’. I always seem to have problems. I pore-fill with Z-poxy Finishing Resin which is fine. It’s easy to sand. I even gave the maple top a coat because, although it’s not supposed to need it, it really ‘pops’ the figure. But I always seem to find that, even after two or three applications, when I start to apply whatever finish, unfilled pores start showing up. I’ve had success with Tru Oil in the past but sometimes find it dries too fast and in the wiping off picks up tiny fibres. So this time I used Liberon Finishing Oil which seemed OK on the back, but again I found little specks on the front. So I sanded it off the front and applied a few coats of Osmo Polyx. Although this went on and wiped off fine, I still had smear marks so, in the wiping off, I started wiping so vigorously that I seemed to be polishing it. In fact, for a satin finish, it looked quite shiny, so I stopped. I don’t recommend this finishing procedure! Anyway, I finally got all the bits screwed together and this is what it looks like. There’s some colour variation in the photos. They were taken in indirect daylight and the sun kept going in and out, which didn’t help and this maple seems to change colour depending on the angle from which you look at it. Without the bridge cover. Showing the discrete arm bevel and the bridge cover. It looked OK on the drawing, it’s the same width as the pickup rings but in reality it’s rather intrusive, even though I modified it by making it sloping. The pickup rings with black screws. The pickups come with chrome screws (which I dislike) so I mounted them from the back. Full frontal. Should have put the bridge cover on as it might have looked OK in this view. Too late now. Back view. I lke battery boxes. No hassle or risk of damaging the wiring if the battery needs changing. Body/neck junction. This probably doesn’t make the instrument any nicer to play, but I find it more aesthetically pleasing. I’m sure Fender could do something similar if they wished. After all, they’re made by robots these days, but perhaps the purists would be up in arms if they got rid of that big, clunky square block. I know they’ve introduced what they call a ‘sculpted heel’ on some models which, I imagine, is no more ergonomic then mine. YMMV. A closer view of the arm bevel. And one of the clunky bridge cover. Knobs and switch and jack socket. Headstock front. (I really should have straightened that string tree.) And the back. If you have been, thanks for watching.
    2 points
  23. double thanks... there is some good info here and endorsed by mikro as well so... taking it to the bank.
    2 points
  24. We've got a small hand shower in sauna, and the heat caused the screw thread holding the plastic sprinker disc to break. Having that fly into kiuas (sauna stove for non-Finnish readers) produced a lot of dark oily toxic aromas one didn't want in sauna.... Not sure how this helps. Maybe throw a pickup onto sauna stove stones to test it? Is that a valid methodology?
    2 points
  25. In the last 7 years - divorce, moved, vehicular homicide (ran over a guy), job loss - 2 years unemployed, bankruptcy, career change, lost my house, moved, remarried, I'm really ready for a break.
    2 points
  26. It makes the job a single-handed affair.
    2 points
  27. Sorry for not explaining enough. the table was purchased from GumtreeUK £450. the only problem with rosewood is the weight, this took 3 of us to carry. as you can see it is or was 60mm thick took 2 days to cut and plane in my shed. with the legs I have enough for 12 bodies 8 necks 18 fretboards although the one pictured is wenge fretboard. it is a rather heavy guitar as you can imagine. About me well this is my hobby and I build in my shed in the garden. All guitars are cut shaped routed by hand as I don’t have cnc just a bandsaw and Agee other bits and bobs. have already made a reverse explorer with this table . If anyone wants to see let me know and I will post.
    2 points
  28. Thanks man! Well, I could CNC the neck profile, but it's all about workholding. The neck won't have a flat bearing surface once the fingerboard is on, and if it shifts during the cycle then the whole thing gets screwed up. I could do the profile before I glue the fingerboard on, however there's potential for splintering along the very edge. I also prefer clamping flat to flat to get even pressure, so having an existing neck profile makes glueup more tedious and introduces potential for error. Doing the profile by hand using a jig is controllable and very hands-on. The adjustment built into the jig along with the easy puck-based profile transitioning makes it quicker to dial in than an entire CNC program. Plus I love jigs. @ScottR knows this!
    2 points
  29. The ergonomics are great as well. I hate tools that are top-heavy such as plunge routers. I like a tool to have a low centre of gravity so that it feels (and is) planted on the workpiece. Both for safety and ensuring that the work is performed without hitch or effort. Physics and ergonomics are a big part of good woodworking.
    2 points
  30. Here’s what the neck looks like now. The thing behind it is the support I use for working on it and also use as a clamping caul when gluing the fingerboard on. Started by sanding a radius where the neck meets the headstock. I also sanded a smaller one where the neck meets the body and then took off the surplus from the back of the neck on the bandsaw (but I forgot to take photos). I draw up the cross section of the neck at first fret and body junction to enable me to cut a series of facets which will be rounded off to produce the finished neck profile. Lines for the first two facets are drawn onto the neck and ‘notches’ cut at each end. The ‘notches’ are joined up. I cut 4 more facets in the same way and then round them over using sanding boards rather than rasps or files. I finish using cloth backed abrasive in the ‘shoeshine’ method. I didn’t take any photos of all that either, so now it looks like this The neck is blended into the heel and headstock using rasps, files and sanding boards. To get a nice transition from neck to body, I do it with the neck installed. The figure in the headstock veneer makes it look as though there’s a ‘volute’ in this photo, but the back of the headstock is flat.
    2 points
  31. Thanks folks! Your words of advice are not only informative, but encouraging. I'll try those things and down the line when I get time, I'll see it through and post pics of my progress. Thanks again!
    2 points
  32. Well you know how it is. What looks minor to the casual observer looks like the effin' grand canyon to the guy what made it! SR
    2 points
  33. Thanks Scott. Yeah, it's a little detail bit I'm happy with how it's all tied together. And also, big news, with thanks to the help from Biz and Mike, the guitar is (essentially) done. The nut is now sorted, the action much more reasonable, and the neck is now nicely back square where it all should have been. I've got a couple of tiny details to sort (changing the screws on the truss rod cover to smaller, black plated screws, etc) but yeah, I'm calling this the finish line. I'll take some glamour shots later in the week. Thanks again to everyone who chimed in and helped out with the build, I've learned a metric shitload on the way through and thoroughly enjoyed the process
    2 points
  34. I was trying to get the photos to go side by side but they kept coming up all in line Glued top to body and routed binding channel Had to join the binding. I thought it was a good place to hide but discovered later you look straight at it when playing! Found a hacksaw blade the best thing to cut off excess Had to reshape the top a bit, worked out nicely In hindsight it would have been better for the joint to be the other way round, or just a square joint. I'm still holding hope that I can melt it over On previous guitars I've had trouble getting a tight tenon joint but this time I used hand tools more and I'm very happy with it. Haven't glued on yet, just held in with a screw! I just sit here looking at it. The maple has no flame in it but that swirling grain is magic
    2 points
  35. I just had to check the word "squirrely" because it made me think about squirrels which obviously wasn't what you meant. So it appears to also mean "unpredictable" which makes totally sense! A new word learned, not a bad day!
    2 points
  36. cnc is really the bass-o-matic of the the tool world. so many tools it can do the job of! afa wing tip... if a luthier makes a mistake and no one sees it... is it still a mistake? also, mmmmmm steak.
    2 points
  37. I have similar memories, potentially even from a guitar building video from - dare I say - a luthier with a tattooed head...
    2 points
  38. I should probably pick up some fresh sanding drum sleeves in coarse and medium grits for surfacing the back of the headstock, and also plan out how that diameter works with the volute. Unlike volutes that have specific purposes - such as providing strength behind a truss rod cavity access point - this volute is largely cosmetic. Thicknessing the headstock with a spindle sander fence will have a "flatness target" just beyond the first tuner's screw location, and from there it becomes a more manual task to shape in the rise. I also decided that I will approach the fingerboard differently for a few reasons. Firstly, I want to cut/bind/radius/inlay/slot it off the neck. In principle this can all be done by taping it to an MDF board. This reduces the issues with repeatability mentioned previously which is the best guess I have as to my original offset problems. Human error is always the first call when errors occur, however I still have no good answer why that went tits up. It does push me towards reducing repeat cycles on the same part, or at least factoring out errors between them as much as possible. So, before this the Ebony fingerboard blank will be run over a jointer both face and edges, then through a thicknesser. To eliminate any possibility of snipe in the glueing face, I will (try and remember to) glue service material either side of the Ebony. Essentially these are strips of random wood longer than the piece you want to protect that are the same thickness. The planer's infeed roller "takes up" the service material first when feeding the wood in and feeds out with its trailing edge. This way any snipe that occurs during infeed/outfeed is offset to the service material than the workpiece itself. Service material can be attached with superglue or even hot melt adhesive. I've been working on the issues of how to improve the fingerboard inlaying. The epoxy seemed to have sat on a pocket of air in several of the more detailed inlays. The shape of the fingerboard makes it impractical to consider popping it onto a vacuum or pressure chamber, even if I had access to those. A trawl of YouTube revealed a few DIY methods such as using brake bleeding vacuum pumps and "food saver" vacuums. Neither of these will achieve the sorts of vacuum hardnesses that a full-on pressure vessel can, however they may be enough to pull air pockets out and through the epoxy. Primarily, I can reduce the depth of the inlay pockets to 1-2mm which will definitely help. But how to put the fingerboard under vacuum? One video of how to produce a cheap DIY vacuum degassing vessel from a cookie jar got me thinking. If I can't put the fingerboard into a vacuum vessel, can I put a vacuum chamber onto the fingerboard? I've got a few tiny single-serving jam jars which have a diameter of maybe 30mm or so. If I can drill a hole through the base and apply some sort of compressible silicone gasket around the rim, I might be able to hold this over a poured inlay and pull a vacuum over each inlay one by one. Whether this is using a brake bleeder, a mini food bag vacuum pump, my Festool dust extractor or the Venturi at my workplace will be a bit of an experiment. Using what is to hand feels better since it allows more time and concentration. The dust extractor feels like the most convenient (and free) followed by figuring out how to use the Venturi. Lastly, working the fingerboard off the neck give me the option of making a neck carving jig: This solution is similar, and I like the enclosed nature of the mechanism even though it is more complex and requires additional material such as the Plexi. I don't currently own a router appropriate for that length of bit, however I can certainly borrow one until I do. The profile pucks seem a perfect solution since I am very much a desktop designer, CNC operator and propellorhead, plus it's a good jig to have going forward.
    2 points
  39. Partly, yes. I also find it easier to tell when the sandpaper starts to clog, since I can't hear the sound change due to my blaring music. Another reason is that for a carved top I find it easier to follow contours. I can also move my fingers around on the piece of sandpaper, thus "using up" all of it. And finally, not to sound too artisan, but I feel like I'm more at one with the workpiece when I'm directly connected to it. This all applies to complex shapes such as guitars - I wouldn't exactly sand layers of paint off a cabinet without some help from blocks or power tools.
    2 points
  40. Drilled a lot of holes today. First up, let's attack the string-through ferrule holes. I marked out on both sides where the holes should be, and used a Drillmate to get the top holes drilled to the depth of the ferrules at 5mm with a brad point. Lacking a drill press, I invested fifty bucks in a Drillmate a while ago - for those unaware, this is a kind of portable drill press set on a base and two pillars, with it's own chuck and bearings. It's fantastic for places a drill press wouldn't reach, for instance, if you need to drill a straight perpendicular hole in a wall stud or a bench top. It's no replacement for a good solid press, of course, but I definitely lack the space for a press large enough for my needs - I've just about managed to squeeze a 10" bandsaw into my shop, and it's getting very cosy! Here's the Drillmate mounted to a jig: Let's take a closer look at that jig. It is a pretty standard thing used by a lot of people, albeit usually on a real drill press. The bottom layer has a "pinhole", in this case 5mm in diameter, through which I poke the shank of a drill bit and locate it inside one of the ferrule holes in the top of the guitar upside down. This should theoretically allow me to drill holes into the bottom of the guitar that line up perfectly with the ones on the top. Even looking at that last photo now, I can understand why this jig system didn't work as well as planned. Think about a big solid floor-standing press - it's solid and heavy, and should travel downwards in a smooth fashion. This Drillmate has just the slightest "wobble", to the point where it is felt more than seen. And the MDF jig just was not stable enough. The distance between the two inside faces is the same as the guitar body thickness, so it doesn't lean over in use, but in future I would consider making a similar thing out of steel. The bottom ferrule holes came out ever so slightly wonky. The strangest thing is that the 3mm holes going all the way through 45mm of rock maple to the other side, well they were fine! Dead straight and perfectly aligned when they popped through. But the 8mm holes that only travel ten mil deep? Nope, they wandered. The photo looks terrible. I measured the deflection, and we're talking about +/-0.25mm. But it only takes a tiny amount for the human eye to be drawn to it, and label it a mistake. So I enlarged the holes every so slightly, and will have to glue the ferrules in with dust and CA, using a jig to hold them in a straight line. Luckily, there's a good flange on the ferrules, which I'm hoping will hide the issue. Failing that, I'll route an opening and install a steel plate to hold the ferrules. We're doing an oval jack socket plate, which means it's an easy install - spade bit right through to the cavity. Had I the forethought, I would've done this before routing the electronics cavity. Not that there was much if any tear-out on the inside, but y'know, it can't hurt. Tuner holes, standard stuff - measured out the tuner size, spacing, and string paths, then went at it with a handheld drill with some sacrificial timber clamped to the back of the headstock. Knocked through some pot-holes, and set to it with low-grit sandpaper. As seen a few photos ago, the edges of the body are still marred with router scorch marks, the top carve has grinder scarring, and there are still tooth-marks on the neck from rasps and files. I purposefully leave all of this "shape-sanding" until the last step before finishing, because I have previously spent hours sanding guitars at every step of the way, just to accidentally slip while dressing the 24th fret, or something similar. So, thus begins the sanding mission. I do it all by hand, or shall I say, fingertips. There's always music and a few beers involved! I've packed it in for the night - tomorrow I'll take it all to a higher grit, struggle with end-grain for hours, and hopefully get some stain done.
    2 points
  41. What's got two thumbs and doesn't have a Facebook account?
    2 points
  42. I'll be paying the man good money for any more reclaimed timbers he can throw my way. Only problem is, being the kind hearted man he is, he thought it prudent to grind off all the nail heads sticking out of the timber, so I don't cut myself.... And now I can't remove the nails! Bless the man, but probably half of that chunk of wood can't be used, for fear of wrecking blades and bits. But still, that makes about half a dozen fretboards! Very little work lately. I've been downgraded from a covid "close contact" to a "casual contact", which means I have freedom to do grocery shopping again, but not much else. And the weather's been fairly crap, which has dissuaded me from venturing to the end of the garden. What a week. I did rout the pickup bay, though. Every time I make a new template, I eff it up and have to do it again. I'm aware of all the jigs that use a few pieces of factory-edge timber, but every single time I end up going: ah well I'll just make this one out of MDF with a jigsaw and files, then I'll do the rest properly. Never again. Route came out pretty good. Just need to chisel out the "ears" a touch to make this Duncan Distortion fit. Because we're all locked down, and the postal service here has quite literally fallen apart at the seams (along with public transport), I was getting quite worried about procuring the correct items for finishing this guitar. But then, I received two packages in the mail the other day - a can of oil, and two different flavours of "Prooftint" stain. Here be a test patch.
    2 points
  43. Now it’s ready for the rest of the binding. The treble side is straightforward, but the bass side binding has to be pushed down in the bevel area, so reducing it in height to about 2 mm in that area helps it to bend. The rebate is cut so that, when the binding is installed, it will be a little proud of the top surface and the sides. It’s easier to scrape the binding flush with the top and sides than the top and sides flush with the binding. I now have to shave the corner off to form the bevel. This left a couple of triangular grooves which I filled with two strips softwood. I’ve only done one bevel like this before, on an OM, and I didn’t trust myself to cut it with a spokeshave and keep a constant 45° angle all the way round. So I took most of it off with the spokeshave and then finished off with this sanding contraption. After sanding, the bevel looks like this. You can see the upper softwood filler. The lower one has almost gone.
    2 points
  44. I can now install the purfling, but I can’t install the binding at the same time. I do it a little at a time, holding it in place and applying a drop of water-thin CA and trying not to glue my fingers to it. Should have taken photos but . . . The third piece of binding goes on first. It covers the length of the bevel. It’s not as deep as the rest of the binding, it’s the same depth as the purfling. I take most of the surplus height off with a little block plane and finish off flush with the top with a cabinet scraper. Now I run the router round this area again, as if I were routing for the binding, which tapers off the ends of the bevel top binding. Just as the binding rebate had to be widened on the top, in the area of the bevel, it also has to be deepened in the side by an equivalent amount. I haven’t been able to think of a way of doing that with a router, so I have to resort to craft knives, chisels and patience.
    2 points
  45. So here's the proof of the tests. The top one is the lower percentage of glow pigment, the lower was something like 50%. Note the pinholes in the surface that ended up capturing some of the dust from filing/sanding back. It seems like 30% is the mark to hit. (edit for clarification, or at least bringing the test results together) The epoxy to pigment ratio is a band that seems to top out around 30%, and the band itself is dependent on how deeply the epoxy is being cast. The more epoxy and less pigment, the higher the likelihood that the pigment will crash out and the deeper it can sink. The lower strata of the epoxy will end up with a far higher ratio of pigment than the original mix and would resemble the lower sample if you cut that far back into the epoxy. Higher ratios reduce the amount of pigment crashing, but introduce new problems; pinhole bubbles not migrating through and out of the casting adequately due to higher viscosity or shear tension, and surface pigment causing a poor finish when cut back. The poor surface finish of exposed cut pigment grains is likely less of an issue if the final piece is being clearcoated. This would effectively "resubmerge" the surface grains and makes the finished item look as though there is the bare minimum of epoxy over the glow pigment. If anything, this would produce the strongest and most visible glow, plus the easiest to charge. The pinholes are far more problematic in that sanding dust or other fine debris can be impossible to remove. I haven't got compressed air to try and blast the stuff out same as most, so it has to be taken that this is maybe not achievable. If it were, and a clearcoat could fill those up, that would be the high standard of glow power and maybe through-consistency. Eliminating bubbles seems to be the absolute decider here for clearcoated items. For exposed castings, the right ratio of pigment to epoxy with normal heat bubble elimination. In principle this would mean that I could try the original binding and detail ideas that require deeper castings using more viscous epoxy and higher fractions of glow pigment, however there would be a very significant increase in trapped bubbles that would require pressure to crush. Vacuum elimination would disrupt any homogeneity within the epoxy/pigment mix, increasing crashing, pushing epoxy out of the cast with bubbles or at the very least reducing consistency within the casting. It would also require a not-insignificant amount of epoxy, pigment and equipment to achieve, if it could be achieved at all.
    2 points
  46. I've got the tape off the sides, got most of the sanding of the sides done, but couldn't resist doing a mock up, so threw some tru oil on the sides and put all the hardware in place
    2 points
  47. Had a wood delivery the other day, including my spruce bracing stock, African ebony fretboards, head plates and bridge blanks, also a couple of more tops, a german spruce and a sitka spruce. None of the above is particularly expensive wood. e.g the tops were around £15 each, bridge blanks £2 a go, head plates £2.80 and fret boards £8.50. But all good quality for the price, no defects, I've used a few of their fretboards now and can't fault them so highly recommend Maderas Barber for acoustic stuff, their electric tops and body blanks are a bit of a rip off IMO. The brace wood was nice and dry so after the better part of a week I started cutting some of it up to make my braces for the limba build. When I cut the lap joint for the x brace this time, I followed the Driftwood guitars method - marked them out against the template aligned them together in the vice and cut them both at the same time. The resulted joint was much better than the last - fitted together perfectly with no play and lined up with the template perfectly, Also cut up one of the face plates to make the bridge reinforcement. Cut to 2.5mm then radiused on the deck. Got that glued in at the same time as the x brace. My stewmac order hasn't arrived yet so I'm still waiting on the extra ebony binding which is holding up the walnut build.
    2 points
  48. With the neck timbers having arrived, they have been joined up which means that most of the major structural components are now ready for their respective further stages of work: There are a myriad of small jobs on each, plus a few big and scary ones! The first falls into the small jobs category - fitting the cutaway sides. One is gluing: While the other one is glued and the excess removed. At some stage, the bottom edge will be routed for some maple binding to be fitted. Now that will be scary...
    2 points
  49. Hm! No flies on you Mister @Prostheta ! B But I'm afraid I don't have a spare Telecaster at the moment .
    2 points
  50. I've been working on polishing the front of the guitar body. Really happy with it, the blue really does look iridescent in real life. Just got a bit more polishing to do then I'll get to oiling the sides and back of the body.
    2 points
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