Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Bizman62

    Bizman62

    Veteran Member


    • Points

      68

    • Content Count

      2,196


  2. Prostheta

    Prostheta

    Veteran Member


    • Points

      31

    • Content Count

      14,028


  3. David Ivy

    David Ivy

    Established Member


    • Points

      31

    • Content Count

      111


  4. MiKro

    MiKro

    Veteran Member


    • Points

      29

    • Content Count

      3,028


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/28/2020 in all areas

  1. Covid19 happened and our class was canceled so this thread wasn't finished the way it was meant to. During the last Saturday before lockdown I got it pretty much finished and let the fellow builders play it through my Blackstar Fly. Let's just say she could sing both metal and jazz and anything in between, even the plunkety plunk I'm capable of producing. While she was hanging on the wall waiting for the finalest of the final touches I cooked a batch of wax from carnauba flakes and beeswax candles and pine turpentine. I spread the wax all over when it was still hot and running and buffed her n
    6 points
  2. With this one I wanted to challenge myself properly. This is my fourth full build, built at the community college workshop during wintertime Saturdays. She's a semi hollow LP-profile neck-through as I titled the thread but let's just call her Ovie... So: Top: Flamed Ovangkol from Madinter, Spain Body: Torrefied Estonian Alder from the sauna department of the local hardware store Accent laminates: 0.55 mm flamed Birch a fellow builder got from a bankrupted flooring factory Neck: Maple with Cherry and Nogal stripes from the outlet of another flooring materials factory
    5 points
  3. The 3D printed guitar that lights up like a Christmas tree when you play it. This is my first guitar build, always wanted to try but spent several years procrastinating. I wanted to combine my tech knowledge with my love of guitar. For some back drop; I'm an embedded software engineer by trade which is kind of a software engineer smashed together with an electrical engineer. After struggling my way through Fusion 360 CAD software I came up with a 3D design that I liked. However I had no way of printing it because my printer was too small. I then spent the next two years making my own
    5 points
  4. Hey everyone, For those interested... am sharing my idea of a simple base mount that I had constructed for an angle grinder tool. Background: I wanted to use the angle grinder tool for shaping the top of my guitar body. But, I couldn't trust myself to hold the angle grinder tool manually (being inexperienced). I searched around for a good alternative, but to no avail that was suitable for me. After some brainstorming, using scrap wood and hardware I happen to have around, I came up with this solution. ...was very effective for me If interested, Vid documentary here: https://youtu.
    4 points
  5. Hello! Time for a new project - the proud owner of the recently finished Warwick styled bass has asked me to make him another instrument, 8string Iceman with a reversed head. He's already a 8string player. so he knows what he's looking for. We have decided on a slightly Warwick-y construction, spliced necktrough. Some plans were drawn, and the previous logo (rabbit, his surname) will again be used. I started by cutting the rough profile of the center lam, maple. Then. used that as a template to cut some more lams- 2x Canadian walnut and 2x acero parana.
    4 points
  6. Yes - back to basses! I've been asked by A to make a rather special bass. It's going to be a mix of trad and modern. And maybe a world first...? The basic spec starts fairly conventionally: - Mahogany back; figured walnut top - Multi-laminate (prob 9 ) neck - Neck through - hints of EB-O with added essence of Alembic and then it starts pulling into the middle lane: - headless, single ball - chambered - 30" scale and then we are
    4 points
  7. Probably ruining @Bizman62 's fantasy ( ) , but this is what I CALL a routing template: It's dampened and so is pretty much the colour it will end up with when finished. The whole of the middle section will, of course, be covered in fretboard, pickups and bridge, but that quilting starting to show even before the finish is on will really pop out, including on the main still-to-be visible parts It has to be said that walnut is one of the most delightful of timbers to work with. Looks good, easy on the tools, smells great
    4 points
  8. What do you do when you already have a number of projects on the go? You start another one haha. So I have a set of plans from American Furniture Design Co. (https://www.leevalley.com/en-gb/shop/tools/plans/73902-nancys-rocker-and-footstool-plan?item=01L5131) which I've made copies of to turn into templates. I just need to head to the hardware store and purchase some larger MDF because the sheets I had weren't big enough. I'm also just waiting for one of the woodworking stores here in Australia to get a specific rebate router bit back in stock that I will need for the leg joints.
    4 points
  9. Cthulhu Woods: - Cocobolo neck - Gaboon ebony fret board with Cthulhu inlay in Mother of Pearl - Swamp ash body Scale length: Muli scale 25.5" - 27.5" Hardware: Hipshot tuners and bridge, stainless string retainer / sustain block Electronics: Tosin Abasi signature Fishman Fluence pickup. One mini switch for Fluence voicings, and one for B / B-N / N pickup selection This one has been a long time coming. I've had the idea for this inlay planned for years, and finally built up a reserve of patience to try it. The body design is from a Tosin Abasi prototype built by
    3 points
  10. It's finally taking shape. Here's the truss rod I had made locally, the nut is a bit smaller, so some small amount of wood is left untouched when routing the channel. marked, then routed and fitted Since the untappered side is no longer needed, proceeded with planing it down, I definitely got better at it Starting on the headstock - cut and sanded the template, 55m locking nut, clamped to the stock to mark the lines on the other side, to pick the stock for the ears Cut, planed and taped in place, and glued Thicknessed t
    3 points
  11. This was my first build, a Solidbody Strat, made from Australian hardwoods! I used a set of plans for the dimensions, but made a few changes to a standard strat, I'd always wanted a guitar with dual HB's and so here it is! I've learnt so much from my first go at building, for someone with no experience at all with timber, every step was a lesson! I have no idea what to call it, so it's the AusStrat? The body is Queensland Maple, the neck is Silver Ash, both purchased from David Linton at Australian Guitar Timbers. The fretboard is a nice piece of Red Box which i found lying around in the
    3 points
  12. Agreed. This dark aspect of human history is unrelated to gnome boobs, thankfully.
    3 points
  13. In spite of not being a gambler, I would put money on one of my farts most days. To say that this is the measure of whether one has plateaued is maybe not the best.
    3 points
  14. Ran 250 ft of service entrance wire from my power pole to that old house yesterday and got the power set up. Tomorrow a friend is bringing over his little backhoe so I can bury it. I feel about 96 years old now. It wasn't an easy job.
    3 points
  15. And to the headless system. There are relatively few around that are single ball and A (I think likewise) prefers this to double ball-end types. And that brings me to Nova Guitar Parts - Andre Passini in Brazil. He used to sell them on ebay, but to his surprise, the Chinese started 'selling them' - on ebay and complete with knock off graphics!!! I think if you wanted to describe the word 'blatant', it would be a good example. I noticed when I went searching them out that both his and the Chinese ones had gone. Presumably Andre complained to ebay and ebay took notice and did
    3 points
  16. Also an update on the SG - frets are in, still not leveled, first coat of nitro dye done. Still one coat of wine red to go, and then the lacquering.
    3 points
  17. Thanks AD! And yep, I'm very happy with the bridge so far. I had the in laws visiting this weekend, so that was a good excuse to go and steal some shed time! Made some really good progress. I fixed up the control cavity (still made a little mistake, but much less bad than before and can cover it up with the cavity cover. Chalk that one up as a learning experience I've also put the chamfer on the under side of the body, put in a flat on the inside of the control cavity that will be where the jack plug goes through to the outside. Then got started on the control cavity cover.
    3 points
  18. Your enthusiasm is infectious, you clearly have the mindset for this work. It’s slow and methodical, there are some accepted truths (or just really good ways to do something), but lot’s of room to do your own thing. I can comment more later, but I’d say: -don’t get too hungup on having the right tool. There are lots of ways to get a job done. -Go slow and with purpose. Its not a race, more like a puzzle. -Don’t be afraid to put some nice wood into it. People can get apprehensive about nicer woods, but you’ll be happy when you’re done. - Most tasks - when you think you’re do
    3 points
  19. I received a post today from Melvyn Hiscock, as I am friends with him elsewhere on social media. As many of you may know, Melvyn has been battling cancer for some time now. His health is deteriorating at an increased pace lately. He has battled his cancer with a smile on his face the entire time. All while trying hard to finish his latest edition of his book "‘Make Your Own Electric Guitar" the 3rd edition. Yes the one we have always considered the Guitar builders bible. Please Pray for Melvyn and his wife Caroline. You may also leave him a message here as well, as he
    3 points
  20. 3 points
  21. Well we can't have Mike going unchallenged I present to you "African Bass Fula" made for my friend and gauntlet thrower, Tom. ("Fula" is the Mandinkan word, the local language in The Gambia, for 'Two') In short, Tom does a lot of work in The Gambia and knows one of the leading drum makers there. A few years ago, they unexpectedly presented him with a 'bass body' made from traditional African drum wood. Against all odds I built a playable bass from it. Everyone was delighted. So delighted that they presented him with another one at his last visit... As a post-script, the
    3 points
  22. I think what @mattharris75 is raising is that the OP is asking general questions about guitar building in the forum where work in progress and build threads are discussed. @PRSpoggers - I think your query will be better served if it's posted in a section of the forum where it will get the most attention. Queries like 'what tool do I need to achieve X' and 'which truss rod would you recommend' are better suited to the Tools and Shop Chat area or the Design Bar area respectively. The In Progress and Finished Work areas is primarily intended for documenting your build and sharing your constr
    2 points
  23. I routed a round over on the body & I put the frets in the fretboard on the neck.
    2 points
  24. That's a little disingenuous, maybe even playing fast and loose with history versus scientific progress. Medicine would have gotten to point X regardless of the path. Same as splitting the atom; it was weaponised and utilisation jumped on as part of the process towards learning the nature of the thing. Also, not physics. It does raise the well worn question of morals over ethics; did it qualify as being morally correct whilst ethically wrong? In my opinion, completely not since it was abandonment of decency for the sake of shortcut "results". I wouldn't say that modern medicine "owes", but per
    2 points
  25. My pucker string is still water tight, so I've got that going for me.
    2 points
  26. That's definitely a female butt-crack
    2 points
  27. You guys are terrible. Talking of Dolly Parton, I think that it is possible to express all things mathematically. On some level Dolly must have profited or taken a greater share of it from the size of her (quoting Zappa) "mammalian protruberances". On some level that is undeniable. So how much do we owe to her boobies for this Moderna vaccine?
    2 points
  28. It's funny how many things I do these days don't seem nearly as easy as they did last time I did them. Then I remember the last time I did was 30 years ago. SR
    2 points
  29. She gets turned in many directions whilst being carved. And she must be held tightly whilst a very sharp blade is being wielded. So..... the best handles providing the best grip is what gets gripped. At this point she doesn't even realize what's happening, but I'm sure I'll have to apologize or at least say excuse me at some point. SR
    2 points
  30. That neck is cleaning up nicely. SR
    2 points
  31. Got this yesterday. My eyesight isn't that great but I could still see through it
    2 points
  32. Dust is best collected as close to the source as possible. That means running tools that generate large quantities of fine particulates with dust extractors or vacuums. The mask should only really be relied upon as a backup to whatever other dust management you're using. If you can smell the dust you're generating while sanding either the dust isn't being collected effectively at the tool, your dust mask isn't fitting correctly or the dust mask isn't rated to filter out the particles you're generating. Is the fan drawing the air from the basement to outside? If all you're doing
    2 points
  33. Very nice Andy, thank you for your support!
    2 points
  34. The patching strip looks fine. Believe or not, trying to figure out how to help you recover from your mistakes helps the rest of us as well. One lifetime would not be long enough to face all the potential issues in our own builds. The last time I made a similar patch was to replace rotten wood in a window pane.
    2 points
  35. Some minor progress today as well as some drawback. The bearing of the router bit dug into the soft poplar so badly that I had to resand the sides. That made the binding very thin. I'm currently pondering whether I'd leave it as is or redo the binding channel deeper and get some fake tortoise shell. The latter would match with the buttons... After countersinking the control knob cavities to make them level with the control cavity I then routed the latter deeper. Despite several measurings I routed it too deep so I had to add some material. Luckily there was a piece of 3 mm Baltic Birch pl
    2 points
  36. 2 points
  37. Hello everybody! Just for some quick background this will be my 4th build. They've all been a little less than straightforward and range from a 70's era Martin acoustic kit to an entirely 3D printed Les Paul Jr. Anyway onto the concept for this build. I've seen several guitars throughout the years with built in amps but they've all been low quality or gimmicky. That being said, if you look past the shortfall of what's commercially available the concept seems solid. Theoretically speaking there's a lot of common ground between what makes a good solid guitar body and speaker cab. I'm in the
    2 points
  38. qThat's a great way to think of it I stalked your profile and found your write up on finishing at home without a workshop - will stick to that like glue Cheers, will share back soon when it's all done! C
    2 points
  39. Hi Another polyurethane varnish user As @ScottR says, when I do gloss finishes I pretty much always use old-fashioned polyurethane varnish (specifically Ronseal Hardglaze). I used to do that exclusively with wipe on techniques (there is a tutorial on the site about my methods) but since a formulation change by Ronseal (no criticism - it was to reduce the environmentally unfriendly volatiles) I have more recently started to use significantly less thinners and use an artist's watercolour fan brush to apply. But that's by the by. Reading through your posts, I'm pretty
    2 points
  40. If it's a career in luthiery you want to pursue I'd recommend you start making inroads now. Most people here are doing this on a hobbyist basis and it is not their primary source of income; their day jobs subsidise their hobby. A (very) small number of members here make guitars professionally and as a means to eke out a living from it. It's a long road up from absolute beginner to a full time successful job, and it covers a lot of varied and different skillsets - design, mathematics, electronics, fine woodworking, mechanics, tool maintenance, finishing. Not forgetting the business side of thin
    2 points
  41. congrats on another fine build!
    2 points
  42. all done. buffed with fine compound and i'm happy with the results.
    2 points
  43. Well , that is exactly what was happening here until the actual facts began to come to light. There were cases of deaths recorded as Covid when the persons died from an automobile accident. Also those that had heart attacks were covid deaths if they had tested positive for covid. Why is it that if one has had or has covid and they were already at a very high risk of something that it is covid that killed them? If they had a heart attack then say that, add that they had possible contributing factors as covid. When someone dies of a heart attack and has the flu, it is a heart attack and the flu
    2 points
  44. Plastic on wood can be problematic as it may not want to stick to glue. ABS is popular as bindings and purflings as it can be glued (rather melted) to wood with acetone. You can even mix a glue like slurry by melting ABS into acetone. "Greasy" glues like polythene (plastic bags), polypropylene (folders etc.) and PVC (vinyl records) can be challenging especially if they're solid and shiny - similar to metals or glass. There's ways but the vibrations or a shock can knock the plastic off. Sticker glue might work at start but especially on bare wood it will dry and fail. There's lots of
    2 points
  45. It's a shame the Hiscock books haven't been translated!
    2 points
  46. I started building in high school after seeing another guy trying to unsuccessfully make a guitar. Not long after building #1, I ran across Melvyn's book. It fired up my imagination as much as the first D&D hardcover books.
    2 points
  47. You're right, they're a bit on the skinny side. There's not too much play in case you have to plane them straight if they're warped. And the fretboard has to be left thick enough, about 6 mm. Depending on the width and direction of the growth rings you may also want to add a couple of carbon fibre rods on the sides of the truss rod, otherwise you may end up with too flexible necks. Slowly grown hard maple can be strong enough by itself. At 60 cm they're also a bit short but your plan of sacrificing one bit for scarf joints and heels it might be doable. Gluing several pieces for the heel i
    2 points
  48. That's good advice right there. I can't think of a thing I'd add. SR
    2 points
×
×
  • Create New...