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  1. FINEFUZZ

    FINEFUZZ

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  2. avengers63

    avengers63

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/29/2018 in Posts

  1. For the box & bracing, I bought a 10" long, 6" wide piece of 7/8" douglas fir. Pine is inexpensive, and I already know it sounds great, so a $20 piece of lumber is definitely the right thing to use on a "learning curve" piece. I'm not worried one bit about the majority of the box construction. I'm a little iffy on doing the cutaway and PROPERLY attaching an electric-style neck onto an acoustic body. My local lumber yard is OK with me going through to find the piece of lumber I want, so I managed to find one that's nearly perfectly quartersawn. For the fretboasrd, I looked through my stack and found one I've been holding on to damn near since I started woodworking. I always intended to use it as a fretboard, but never did. I honestly don't know what species it is. It kinda looks like lightly flamed walnut, but the color is a little off. Anyway, I guess since I've held onto the thing for so long, this is as good a time as any to use it. Time to get re-acquainted with the circular saw jig I made to assist in re-sawing wood for acoustics. Considering how little room there is for error in re-sawing that thin a piece, and how I'm REALLY not good at it, cutting a deep notch into both sides helps me out tremendously. Of course, I fucked up about 1/4 of the piece cuz I haven't done this in over 3 years, but that's why I bought such a big piece. So what was the yield from a 10' x 6" x 7/8" board? A dinky little pile of thin wood and bracing. It's 2 pieces for the sides, 4 each for the front & back, the back bracing, front bracing, bridge block, and center block. The top will NOT have your traditional acoustic bracing. There will be a 7/8" x 3" piece running straight through the middle to reduce vibration and limit feedback. As it will have a TOM/stop bar, the bridge block will likewise need to be substantial enough to hold it in place. As for the kerfing... ...a leftover douglas fir 1x3 will do nicely. I figure the end & neck blocks will also end up being doug fir. So much else is, there's no point in using a traditional tonewood at this stage. Besides, we all know I LOVE kicking luthier tradition and wood-voodoo square in the dick. So there you go. 3 days off and a metric shit-ton of progress that sorely needed to be done. All the molds & forms are done, all the milling is done. When next we meet, I'll be doing the fun bits. Peace, love, and humptiness.
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  2. Lots of filing to get surfaces back to a smooth plane where metal shrank to form concave areas. Now that I have the top surface established, I can define the edges of the surfaces that surround it.
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  3. Now it is time for the fun to begin!
    1 point
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