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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/23/2020 in all areas

  1. reopening the topic cause this two ones that I left behind started to receive their finishes, blue and dark purple. hope you enjoy!
    4 points
  2. Well yesterday, the truss-rod shipped on 24 hour service last week arrived (not a grumble - just a fact of life at the moment). But, actually, I'm pleased that I ordered a second one (which arrived today), because while the original purchase was very nicely made (the one with the fancy chrome end) it is no good for me on this build: And why is it no good for this build? Well, remembering that the rod is fitted the other way up, the fancy chrome cylinder (inside is probably exactly the same gauges of rod and tip as the one on the left) actually adds another 2mm to the depth of the neck channel - just at the point where the neck is at its thinnest. And if you add the fret height to the fretboard thickness and the rod & tip height (11mm) and take away the planned thickness of the neck at the 1st fret (22mm), it would leave 2mm under the rod at the nut end. And that's not, IMHO, enough. Same calculation with the left hand trussrod, gives me 4mm under the rod - and that is fine. So that's what I've used. Is that going to be a problem for everyone with that particular rod? No - not at all. If the fretboard had been thicknessed 1.5mm thinner and I hadn't wanted the 0.6mm demarcation veneer, then it would have been fine. But, ignoring all that, it means that the fretboard can go on No capping strip (again, this would reduce the meat under the rod), just a strip of masking tape to stop the glue filling the channel, a final check that the neck was flat and that the rod top plate was flush with or below the neck glue face: And...it's on:
    2 points
  3. Some more work done over past few days: started with cutting off the excess areas and routed the slope, still not final thickness. drilled and cut the TR adjustment acess and glued the plate to the headstock still have to saw the nut line in, perpendicular to the fretboard. Then, sawed/chiseled off the overhang of the fretboard. I might have done this differently, with less steps, but this felt more comfortable... and after some filling and rounding the corners, it fits! I can inlay the body part of the alu line now, radius and fret the neck, shape it and start sanding...again...
    2 points
  4. Thanks, I greatly appreciate the input. It helps save me from falling into an internet wormhole.
    1 point
  5. I tried wet sanding once, it was a nightmare! Now I just use finer grits of micro mesh, taking my time, followed by cutting compound and keep the guitar as dry as possible
    1 point
  6. S'pose birds have eaten the bread crumbs dropped on the path. We're lost forever! You're meatier, the witch will eat you first! I'll get more gingerbread to eat!
    1 point
  7. making me want to try yew someday. no fancy quilt/flame/burl... but stunning none the less. just has a fire quality to it. nice work as always.
    1 point
  8. Clamps are off and I couldn't resist a quick mockup: Tomorrow is neck carve day
    1 point
  9. This is a great build thread. BTW, truss rods are fairly easy to make. A friend uses welding rod, bends 1/2" of one end 90 degrees to stop it from rotating and threads the other end.
    1 point
  10. If the finish hasn't cracked off giving it a touch-up can easily be done without sacrificing the living comfort. Minor damage can also be addressed with minimal tools. Now that you've taken the electronics out I'd start with a thorough cleaning. You may even want to take the neck apart for better access to the narrowest gaps. A damp microfiber cloth will remove most of the gunk, revealing the spots where more aggressive methods are required. After cleaning you can better see the real issues on the finish. If there's dings where the wood may be bruised all you'd need is a damp (not dripping but wet) cloth or tissue and a soldering iron. Simply put the cloth over the ding and heat it with the iron. The steam should raise the fibres. Just don't let the tissue dry let alone burn! For scratches some abrasive compound from an automotive store is often sufficient. Deeper scratches may need to be sanded level with wet sandpaper. For cleaning the fretboard a toothbrush can be very useful! If there's tons of gunk a single edge razor blade can be used as a scraper. All in all, the tools and ingredients you'd need aren't too fancy or messy.
    1 point
  11. Wow, just Wow! The blue burst is stunning! And that comes from a guy who prefers earthy colours on wood. The colour scheme looks similar to a beach by the crystal clear sea:
    1 point
  12. Hi! After the holiday break, started with cutting the previously glued templates on the scroll saw. Left one is for last years project that I would also like to finish this spring. Fixed to the LP with 2 layers of tape - holds better that way as I can brandish both sides. I followed Andyjr1515's good advice to drill all eight corners with a proper radius bit, and it worked great! Thanks! I was able to route it all with just my favorite short bit without switching to smaller radiused one just for the corners. Removed some material with a 25mm forstner before, to just about final depth. I'm really glad that my true center line is actually on the seam. and after adding a heel cap and refining the heel profile some more, here's where it's at now: So, just one final round of ...sanding... and I can start the finishing. I'd like to stain the top blue, then sand back for a denim effect. Back, sides and the neck tru oil with a drop of tobacco brown, have to read if it's compatible. For the electronics, I've previously planned to drop in a treble booster, but decided to leave it passive, but I will wire it with 2 volume, master tone and master bass roll of pot. It's still 4 pots, so if I don't like it, can revert to standard.
    1 point
  13. well, I think you could refinish that in a condo... assuming zip strip or other would work on it. It'd be a lot of work tho... without a sander. looks like that finish it pretty thick too. you might just take it to a furniture stripper and have them strip it... been a while since I've been to one but it wasn't that expensive to do a table years ago. that said... I don't know how delicately they treat the wood and if it's set neck... might not be the best idea. I would start with the frets because you don't want to risk finish flaws due to fretwork. any body work you are going to do... you want to do next. you could try to just wet sand it and do some spot filling. lord knows an ibanez finish has plenty of thickness to work with. afa electronics... break it into simple systems. for instance, if you find a drawing with 1v, 1t, 3-way... start there... before you wire the pickups into it... you wire the pickup to the live/ground to the phase switch, then from there to wherever they go on the drawing (3-way). then wire both pickups series link (the two wires that get twisted together) to the ctr lug on the other dpdt / split switch. one of the outter lugs to ground. voilla. hope that helps.
    1 point
  14. How has everybody been? Not much has changed for me, even with all that is going on with the world. Been working a lot, every day. Seems like i never catch up! Here are a few. Quilted maple EXP in "bloodbath" 7 String EXP And the Claro walnut EXP
    1 point
  15. I hope everyone is still good, especially considering our new normal. Just at the point where I'd started to settle into my new job to the point where I was going to start moving projects and tools up, the lockdown was initiated in the UK. I'm fortunate enough to have a cupboard of tools and workbench at home now, although my serious kit (2kW router, bench planer, thicknesser, radius jig, and most of my other guitar specific tools) is all 90 miles away. I have a padauk 2-piece blank and handful of fingerboard blanks with me too. I've kept myself busy by building an enclosure for my little CNC, working on a router sled, and re-sawing padauk by hand. I also caught a drum sander on offer: Fun new fingerboard:
    1 point
  16. haha, actually Rockinger is a supplier of guitar parts & tools in Germany, so no wordplay intended by me here, but they might have intended it that way yeah, ha. Never looked at it like that! the floors are the original floors from 1913 which we refinished, thnks not smiling when they have to sand pickup and control cavities !
    1 point
  17. What a stare. That may be the only paint booth I've ever seen that needs the leaves to be raked. Maybe that's whats behind the stare.... SR
    1 point
  18. Follow up on this thread: I had 2 of these ibanez guitars. First one was done in yellow. Started work on the second one this year and had some help from two local artists this will also be a JS-style but with special painted finish (like the JS-ART models) What will be different on this one : radius. I finished the fretboard with 10" radius. frets: will use narrow jumbo frets this time. Got some new fretwire supplied by Rockinger in Germany pickups: I got a nice deal on a Sustainiac Stealth Pro kit, so I'll be installing that in the neck position.
    1 point
  19. Work continues at a snails pace. The string lock assembly needs to sit a bit lower on the headstock to provide the strings a chance to deflect downwards after clearing the zero fret, so the mounting plate gets recessed into the headplate immediately behind the nut ledge: The hair-thin film of dried Titebond over the trussrod route that the CNC machining reveals is a nice touch : The strings also need a bit of clearance underneath them as they head downhill from the nut to the string locks, so a gentle bit of manipulation of the end of the fretboard is required, The ramp is just added with the use of a small chisel and a bit of finessing with sandpaper: Then it's time to give the string lock adapter plate a quick assemble to see how everything lines up: Note also the installation of the zero fret and nut. I had to stone away the barbs on the fret tang a bit so that the fret was only a firm press fit into the slot. If it had been just a regular fret hammered in it would have likely split the thin piece of timber between it and the nut as it squeezed into the slot. The beauty of using a zero fret is that the nut only has to set the string spacing. String height is governed by the zero fret itself, so I can be as rough as guts with cutting the nut slots - they just need to be deep enough to allow the string to head in a downward trajectory after clearing the crown of the zero fret. In the spirit of the cheap(ish) nature of this build, the nut here is just a cheap plastic pre-cut nut from Aliexpress that cost all of about 75 cents. The slots already cut into the nut just serve as markers for where I need to start filing away hammer and tongs to deepen them enough to just guide the strings down over the zero fret. Then it's time to do my least favourite operation of this whole guitar making malarkey - crowning and polishing. The only enjoyable aspect of this I find is peeling off the tape at the end : Here's something unexpected I hadn't planned for that took me completely by surprise. After the above point I figured it would be a good idea to quickly string it up to see how everything aligned and sat. The problem I came up against was that I could only just get the floating headless trem to balance, even with all 5 springs installed and the trem claw maxed out. Measuring the length of the springs and the amount of stretch they were under compared to another Floyd Rose install I have here revealed no obvious discrepancies that I could account for. The difference with a headless trem (that I hadn't accounted for) is that the string anchoring point in the saddle is a lot further back than a Floyd or traditional Strat-type tremolo. In a Floyd/Strat the leveraging point of the string is pretty much right at the saddle. In a headless trem the string ball end sits inside the tuner screw assembly 2 or more inches further back from the saddle. Consequently the extra horizontal length behind the saddle allows the string to exert more levering force on the trem to counteract the springs, and thus requires more tension in the springs to pull the trem back to equilibrium. The upshot of this rather annoying discovery is that I've had to extend the tremolo spring cavity another 20mm closer to the neck to get me more stretch on the springs. It will look fine once finished and a cover installed, but it's a frustrating setback nonetheless: Which unfortunately means this thing is now scrap as well, as it is now 20mm too short:
    1 point
  20. Japanese instruments are a definite product of their engineering, however they can lack a bit of individuality and "soul" on some level because of the high manufacturing level, but they're still made and finished by humans. The good stuff really has care and love poured in, and no, I don't recall any high end dogs either. Strange choices maybe, but still world-class stuff. It's still true to this day, that if you want an amazing American-made Les Paul, buy a Japanese one.
    1 point
  21. Hello all! I am obviously new here, but was perusing the internet looking for inspiration for my next (attainable!) build. After coming across this site, I have definitely a ton of new inspiration and ideas for where to develop my skills. You guys and gals here are quite incredible woodworkers! My uncle passed away about a year ago, and he was a carpenter by trade. I miss him dearly, he was an incredible man. He gave me a bunch of tools to start off with before he passed, as I had expressed interest in woodworking and guitar-building and being a luthier. It was a fantastic start and I've learned a bunch with what was given to me! I know however (and have from the start!) that I am lacking some very essential tools to create a guitar from scratch. As a result, my first project was an old (circa '08-09) Jay Reynolds that I stripped and rebuilt with plenty of help from the staff at GFS - I'm honestly proud of that guitar! I don't think it's particularly insane like some of the builds I've seen (in this thread alone!), and it definitely isn't perfect, but I am in total love. New stain, neck, locking tuners, pickups, polycap, new pots, I even shielded the entire front cavity with 2" copper tape with conductive adhesive; I'm just almost afraid to post it for fear of past experiences from places such as Reddit, in that I don't want to get torn apart for merely trying hahaha. So anyhow, bored with the backstory yet? Alright on to my post then! I am just more happy I got something that worked with my submission; it was a personal brain-flex to try and use ONLY what I had around the house to build a "campfire guitar" - one that worked with maybe a tiny amp and some simple effects, but was loud enough on its' own and durable/cheap enough to withstand flying embers and spilled beers without me crying. My primary objective was "Working instrument for $0 (additional) cost. I took inspiration from cigar-box guitars as well as resonators (and even kalimbas!) to create what I deem 'The Most Harmonic Piece of Trash' that I personally have seen. I took all the 'usable' old parts from the old Jay Reynolds (only the body was kept for the previously mentioned rebuild!), such as the neck, tuners, and bridge, and two of the tremolo springs. For the body, I glued cedar planks (meant for grilling/flavoring salmon) from the kitchen to two sections of 2x4 found in the garage. I did basic cuts with a jigsaw, sometimes implementing the 'drill-a-bunch-of-holes-with 1/2"-bit-and-connect-the-dots' method (I know I'm lacking serious tools!). I did most of the sanding using a small palm sander, a few custom block sanders (like sandpaper wrapped around a pestle to sand the neck cutout), and a collection of files that I have. The neck sits sky-high to the body, I know. But I only had one size of old lag bolts, and if the neck was deeper, they would have ruptured the fret-board. Remember, this is a build with $0 additional cost being the goal haha. I drilled through the body to add the old bridge, despite having no intentions to make the tremolo aspect functional. I just liked the idea of having a rear compartment for picks, lighters, and cigs (I don't smoke, but my friends do), so I threw a cigar tin on the back as the rear cover. The resonator is made from an altoids tin. I'm most hyped on this part haha. I added a set of piezo-pickups I had extra from a previous kalimba build (the piezos came in a two-pack for $7). I mounted the whole thing to a square block of aluminum that I believe is off my '82 Goldwing (P.O. used it to mount tail light to, but its anodized aluminum so no rust); regardless, it was a useless chunk found in the garage. As some sort of 'buzz dampener', I merely added a bracket meant for installing can-lights to the top of the resonator. I attached those aforementioned tremolo springs to the resonator to give it a bit extra sustain. It makes it sound VERY banjo-esque. This was a fun build that cost me nothing, and honestly looks like a pile of trash. But it plays, and makes some VERY unique sounds when sent through a delay pedal and some minor overdrive. It's not the prettiest sounding; its actually very clangy. But I tend to listen to a lot of electronic-influenced rock (Nine Inch Nails being my favorite and probably most notable) so I could see where it could potentially get use in my own mixes. But you blistering soloists and heavy metal heads probably wouldnt find a use for it. She's clunky, trashy, and slightly cumbersome; but I absolutely love the shit out of it and so do my friends who play around with it! I didn't build the neck from scratch, but this is my first guitar built (mostly!) from the ground up! I highly doubt I will win any contests, I just really wanted to share because I don't do any social media or the like.
    1 point
  22. Thanks! This will be the most ambitious inlay I have attempted, but with a cheap and forgiving material, we'll see how it goes. I finished the shaping of the LP neck, and glued it in. I might do a final revision before finishing. Color scheme is (for now at least) faded blue top and natural brown oiled and waxed back, sides and the neck. Here it is: I must make a new template for 2 hums first though. Also yesterday, I routed the neck pocket on the....???caster thing (it had to have at least a small blemish ) and of course, the test fit
    1 point
  23. Snails..... Gradually, chip by chip we got there. @komodo I see you four score pearl, and raise you one nautilus.. SR
    1 point
  24. "The Tuxedo" MATERIALS: Body is two piece northern ash sourced from peterman lumber (local) Neck is three piece - flamed maple / wenge / flamed maple - also from peterman Top and headstock overlay are quilted maple sourced from elmwood music on etsy Fretboard is ebony sourced from Alleng Guitar (online) Inlays are from ebay user jnnpearlinlay HARDWARE: Frets are jescar wide / low Gotoh Auto Locking vintage tuners Trem King Tremolo Graphtek Nut ELECTRONICS: Seymour Duncan Vintage Stack Bridge Bootstrap Pickups "Squeeky Clean" Neck Oak Grigsby 4-way switch Bournes pots Electrosocket Jack SPECS: 10 deg headstock angle 24 3/4" scale length 1 11/16 Nut Width, .78" thick at the first, .81" at the 12th 12" Radius Fretboard 30" Radius Top and Back, 1 1/2" body thickness with 2 1/8" overall thickness Body is semi hollow 7lbs 2oz Weight DESCRIPTION: This is build #6 for me. Frequently I look at other builder's amazing projects and think "how will I ever get there?" So with that goal in mind, and for each build, I do my best to add elements that will push me beyond my comfort zone. For this build, there were two such milestones for me... first time doing a radius top with a radius back, and first multi-piece neck. This guitar has a lot of similarities to my prior radius top strats... so in some sense, I feel a little disappointed that I didn't push far enough beyond that. On the bright side, I'm starting to see little glimpses of my own style when I look at it. That style is, of course, a reflection of all I have learned from folks here, so thank you all for that! build thread is here:
    1 point
  25. So I’ve been building a headless recently and now it is complete. It’s neck through design...was so close to a one piece in terms of the thickness of the Wenge blank! Oh well. This gradually evolved in to a Strandberg inspired build. One unusual is the scale length of 23.4 and the deliberate lack of a fretboard radius. Combined with the jumbo frets and skinny neck (almost Ibanez Wizard profile) its ended up quite an interesting guitar. First time using Glu boost as a finish, I like it! Although the poplar burl top was very ‘thirsty’ for want of a better word. I don't know why, but some of the images need to be clicked on in order to get the best quality, so worth bearing in mind Build thread - Dark Ember Frets- 21 Radius- Flat Pickups- EMG 57/66 Frets- Jumbo stainless steel Body- Wenge Top- Poplar burl Weight - 5.2 lbs Pickguard- Carbon fibre Finish- Glue boost
    1 point
  26. This is my first time I post on this site. I play for 45 years synthesizers and the last 2 years a little electric guitar . So I am a real DIY builder of many things, I designed an electric guitar with a possibility to link it to synthesizers with more opportunities to play the guitar and synths independently of one another. On the web I discovered the Acpad, which seems to be something unknown. It was a kickstarter project of Robin Sukroso The Acpad was designed for an acoustic guiter. Iwanted the Acpad on an electric guitar, but that was not possible. So I had myself an electric guitar design to get it appropriate to. Here the result: The body is oak and coated with carbon. The neck is of an old Epiphone, Maple neck and Rosewood fingerboard. Two unknow Humbuckers, but sounds great, with a good sustain. I hope you like it. Kindly regards from the Netherlands. Dutch-Riny
    1 point
  27. Two of then are finshed here it goes ....
    1 point
  28. some updates a lot of things was made and a lot of sand ahead!
    1 point
  29. Some updates from the last days
    1 point
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