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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/28/2020 in all areas

  1. This has actually been finished for some time now, but I've only just gotten around to taking some shots of it. Sadly the lighting is a bit off today so there's a few shadows I wish weren't so visible, but I needed to just get in there and finalise it. Thar she blows!
    4 points
  2. I've had a few things to do, but today I'm getting onto re-profiling the neck. I asked Dan to choose his most comfortable neck out of his "stable", and he picked a fairly modern single cut LP junior. So the first job was to copy the profile at the 1st & 12th frets with my mitre gauge and transfer it to paper Then I put it through my hot laminator to stiffen it and cut it out with a scalpel The neck on the Gibson is slightly narrower, especially on the 1st fret. So I adjusted the template to suit and then did the scary bit to that lovely Tru Oil finish...
    3 points
  3. Not at all. There again it has been a while since it was applied. A few swipes with the shinto rasp and it was gone anyway Absolutely in this case. He thought he wanted a very chunky neck, but after playing it extensively for a few days it set off the tendons in his elbow. Apparently this has happened previously on another guitar. Hence why I got him to choose the neck that he finds most comfortable and copied it as best I could (given the slightly different fretboard widths). There can't be anything worse than having a guitar custom made that you then can't play. At least ther
    2 points
  4. I left a bit of wriggle room. I did very nearly create a low spot but luckily stuck the straight edge on in time, while I had enough high spots elsewhere. I'm now sneaking up on it with a 120 grit sanding beam and the occasional blast with a concave cabinet scraper You can make out a few spots that are not quite level yet
    2 points
  5. For a test piece that was way too beautiful for ending up as firewood but what else can you do if it doesn't do what it was meant to? Except adding a hook for hanging on the wall and installing a $2 clock mechanism...
    1 point
  6. Been a while on this project. Tests are semi complete. Some good data, but changes to be made. Next step is to start another one with enhancements that will resolve some weaknesses as well as some acoustic anomalies. This one is now ready for the burn pile. Note: Never use Nogal ( Peruvian Walnut ) in a quarter-sawn configuration, It splits terribly under stress, including using screws. The G2 version will use a hard-tail bridge as I think I have resolution to the issue of torsion in a thin floating top plate. I will be doing a redesign in the bridge area to counteract
    1 point
  7. Full scale mock up out of cardboard... there will be bevelled edges and the points will not be so pointy
    1 point
  8. Ummm... After re-reading this I paid more attention to the measurements being in inches and noticed I was talking about the thickness rather than the height. The advice still applies but I think it's time to do some high end technical drawing using the trusty Paint... So... Sanding the binding flush to the top with an orbital sander should be safe and easy enough as @mistermikev said. Then again scraping such a narrow strip of plastic takes no time. Doing it in an angle also would save the top from being unintentionally sanded. Using an orbital sander on the sides can be tricky especially
    1 point
  9. The strawberry conserve looks good but the mayo looks like the best before date was too long ago... So you're finally admitting that your videos really are educational! Guitar building - Woodworking tips - Home Workshop followed by a glimpse to your other social media links... Your marketing department sure has earned his beer!
    1 point
  10. Something in the region of 25-40W should be plenty. If you're only going to be installing humbuckers I'd suggest it probably isn't really necessary, but it doesn't hurt to do so if you're feeling up to it or if you're also installing single coil pickups. Shielded wire is more effective than shielding tape, so if you have the option of using that instead it would make more difference, although the wiring complexity and effort starts to become more significant. Generally it's easier to use something else that is already grounded to make the connection to the shieldi
    1 point
  11. The info that's floating around out there seems to indicate that the reissue Fender Wide Range Humbuckers are nothing more than a regular humbucker installed into an oversized case. This differs from the original wide range humbucker in that the construction necessitated the larger case. To that end I'd suggest treat them electrically as the standard humbuckers that they appear to be. Bog standard Strat components will work, but you may find that the tone is a little on the dark side, in which case you can exchange the volume and tone pots from 250K to 500K as used in most other humbucker
    1 point
  12. The twins are coming on nicely, I got the necks glued in this week and most of the sanding done. Need to get the bridges installed next then on to finishing. I've also been experimenting with my own coloured grainer filler this week. A combination of pumice powder, linseed oil, lacquer and leather dye. Latest episode
    1 point
  13. Dan tried to post a response to this thread, but had a few difficulties registering. This is what he just WhatsApp'ed to me, what he wanted to say:
    1 point
  14. 1 point
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