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  1. ScottR

    ScottR

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  4. Andyjr1515

    Andyjr1515

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/11/2020 in all areas

  1. qThat's a great way to think of it I stalked your profile and found your write up on finishing at home without a workshop - will stick to that like glue Cheers, will share back soon when it's all done! C
    2 points
  2. Another thing to remember is to avoid pressure when sanding. Pressure will roll the slurry into balls with loosened grit from the sandpaper and those will create deep grooves. You should leave space between the tips of the abrasive chips and the paper for the slurry. Think about a hand plane without a mouth, where would the shavings go? Sandpaper can be compared to millions of miniature mouthless planes.
    2 points
  3. Hi Another polyurethane varnish user As @ScottR says, when I do gloss finishes I pretty much always use old-fashioned polyurethane varnish (specifically Ronseal Hardglaze). I used to do that exclusively with wipe on techniques (there is a tutorial on the site about my methods) but since a formulation change by Ronseal (no criticism - it was to reduce the environmentally unfriendly volatiles) I have more recently started to use significantly less thinners and use an artist's watercolour fan brush to apply. But that's by the by. Reading through your posts, I'm pretty
    2 points
  4. You sure you guys aren't thinking about Moth/Firefly/ Aimee? SR
    1 point
  5. I wouldn't worry about it. Just bought a new extractor. Festool CT-26. It's nice having capacity and ability to control that waste before it goes flying.
    1 point
  6. The three months have been a pleasure to follow your progress with her. And the calluses will grow sooner than you'd believe as the pressure needed is in your muscle memory. I recall my first attempt to play the guitar. Classical nylon strings should be the best for a beginner, yet trying to figure out the dots for three chords from the book seemed to split my fingertips halfways to my knuckles. It wasn't until the next morning that my fingertips had recovered to their normal shape...
    1 point
  7. I thought Orgmorg was a guy named George with a huge beard? SR
    1 point
  8. 1 point
  9. It's time for the Regal to sing. It's time to put some strings on her and see how the neck looks. I'm going to use some very light gauge strings called "silk and steel" they don't put a lot of pull stress on the neck or bridge. These are 10 gauge. Most likely I will most likely switch to 11s after it's all said and done, for these strings will sound very thin.... well because they are thin. http://www.whip-basics.com/forum/img/smilies/big_smile.png First I had to put in the saddle and I sanded it down until it was a light press fit into the saddle slot. I u
    1 point
  10. It's great when somebody has a groove to their style.
    1 point
  11. Yeah, she was posting builds on Facebook back when I used to use it....sometime two years back?
    1 point
  12. Who knows, I miss that guy.He had some different ideas but they were cool builds.
    1 point
  13. Thank you very much! I had thought that what I might have done was go right through a very thin layer. This seemed more noticeable when the thin strip of red epoxy flowing through the body (same scratch problem), once wet sanded (I thought it was thicker...) slightly raised the grain on the surrounding wood. Now, it was all wet sanded to 2000 again, and that particular piece of the wood will be under the G String (It's a P Bass) so I'm not going to bother resanding the whole thing. So, reading an above comment (before your reply), I decided to try one thing
    1 point
  14. I wonder what ol' Orgmorg is up to these days. I always enjoyed having him around. SR
    1 point
  15. One trick to prevent dust from flying is to hang wet bedlinen around your working space.
    1 point
  16. Yeah, it's a great looking bridge, it's a Schaller Signum. Cost me more than I wanted to spend, but it just looked so good! Ha ha. I also figured that if I was going to the trouble of building the whole guitar, I might as well make it the best I could. The guitar I made back in 2015 had a Floyd Rose on it, but in reality I don't think I've ever actually used it in anger, so I wanted to try hard tail this time.
    1 point
  17. I have been working on a scratch built diode laser for a while grbl based. Finally today I finished it. No it is not a CO2 laser so it is slow but it will get done what I need to do. I plan on some CBG style 3 and 4 string models soon that will have laser engraving on them over old fence material for top wood. Give it that worn ass look. A lot like Orgmorg did some years back. LOL mk
    1 point
  18. Something along those lines. If you are going to run your poly that thin, you likely need nothing between coats or maybe a leveling light sand every 4th or 5th coat. You need to build enough to fill your scratches and then level it all and then put a very thin topcoat on. Leveling poly will show witness lines between layers Which is the reason for a very thin topcoat--that doesn't get leveled and therefore doesn't show the witness lines. If all your coats are very thin you will likely need less leveling at the end but it will require many more coats. I'm hoping we can get @Andyjr1515 to c
    1 point
  19. This is the first of an occasional series of tutorials covering tips and techniques for those of us who have limited facilities for building and finishing guitars and basses but nevertheless still wish to produce results that are fit for purpose and perfectly respectable - even when pitched against those produced in fully-equipped guitar building shops. This first tutorial covers wipe-on varnishing. Overview Gloss finishing of a guitar or bass can be daunting for the Bedroom Builder with visions of spray booths, compressors, burnishing wheels and high degrees of skill. With the
    1 point
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