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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/13/2021 in all areas

  1. And while that glue is drying we prep the top for glue up. I hope to get two tops, a headstock plate and a control cavity cover out of this. And while that glue is drying, I finished my body shape and cut it out. SR
    1 point
  2. Yep, that color is gorgeous! Seeing it upside down, there is a man staring out of it. I think it might be Cheech. SR
    1 point
  3. Yes, Strat players are probably well aware of the natural harping that occurs on the open G string if their guitar doesn't have a string tree fitted on the D/G pair. The distance behind the nut to the tuning peg is pretty close to the 5th harmonic on that one string, which then rings like crazy on open staccato runs. I've seen some players exploit it going back the other way though, plucking the string behind the nut to excite the 5th harmonic back onto the open string and then bend the string behind the nut to get some interesting pedal steel-esque slide runs. Metal musicians are often aware of the problem of harping too. High gain and staccato runs on open strings don't sit well with certain styles of metal, and you'll often see their guitars fitted with foam stuffed under the strings behind the nut or fluffy hair ties wrapped around the neck. Personally I could hear the differences between the long and short lengths of string behind the nut, but only on the lower strings. It was most prominent on the low-E long-string-distance example where the resonance as the note started decaying had a descending filter effect, giving an 'eeeeoooowww' after it was plucked (perhaps akin to @Bizman62's 'twang' he described and @mistermikev's 'bloom' characteristic?). The short-string-distance examples didn't have this effect. Whether that was due to the length of string behind the nut causing harping or some other byproduct of the way the string's elasticity differed between the two extremes I don't know. I did the stainless steel/nickel silver trial as I'd seen mentioned that some people didn't like stainless steel on their guitars as they felt it gave the fretted notes an extra metallic 'zinginess' that disagreed with them. That might still be the case when an instrument is played in a real life situation, but on face value from these tests I'm not hearing it.
    1 point
  4. Bulbond is a synthetic resin adhesive - I wish it were candy! For the clamps, you attach a block on one of the holes, based on the size of the piece that needs clamping. The space between the block and the piece is tightened by driving a wedge through. Will take a picture of the other side tomorrow and post it.
    1 point
  5. If I understand you correctly the answer is yes. I asked a University Lecturer (who also happened to be a guitarist) about this and he said when you play a fretted note, the vibrations go past your finger as Longitudinal pulses and past the nut and then of course reach the tuning pegs Edit: I should mention that once the vibrations have got past your finger they return to Transverse waves again
    1 point
  6. There's basically no other rule than to make them low enough not to touch the strings. If you want to make them tougher and less prone to warping, you can laminate them of two or more pieces so that the grain direction of at least one piece is across the main grain direction.
    1 point
  7. OK kiddos, both the Dead Machine and Angkor Wat are hardwared, wired, working, glossed, and finished. Except I'm waiting on an order of strings so I can mount and adjust the necks and do the setup and birth these things for real. So, here's the Dead Machine, done, waiting on strings. Here are the specs: Core Wood: 1-Piece Mahogany Top Wood: 1/2" Bookmatched Spruce Accent Wood: Pickup cover, rear Control cover, Headstock veneer, Truss Rod cover. Figured Koa Hardware: Sperzel brushed gold locking tuners, Gotoh fine-tuning tailpiece, Harmonica bridge, gold dome knobs, neck plate, and strap bushings Pickups: Late 70's Bill Lawrence L-560 set. 8k neck, 12k bridge Passive Electronics: Schaller 5-way 'E' model Megaswitch (wired for 2 HB's), passive 500k volume, passive 250k tone, .01uF tone cap Active Electronics: EMG Afterburner preamp, EMG EXG tone pot, EMG SPC tone pot
    1 point
  8. Aside the abovementioned tricks, spreading some salt on the glue can help. As for the horn nut, Jerry Rosa builds deer antler nuts and saddles and prefers them over bone.
    1 point
  9. Watched the YT, that color is Gorgeous! I noticed something interesting that I would have never noticed otherwise than seeing the YT. The way different people use their equipment, their settings, etc. It looked to me like you have your velocity (pressure) reasonably higher than I use, and your volume (product) reasonably lower than I use. Said otherwise, I generally shoot a thicker coat at a lower pressure, at least as far as clearcoating goes. Just interesting, as my eye is always noticing that kind of stuff. Gorgeous.
    1 point
  10. I think its just your camera auto-self-adjusting as you move around the piece. It happens to me all the time, that's why I post pics under different lighting. It makes the camera react differently and makes the guitar look completely differently under different lighting. But its really the camera (phone) adjusting to suit. Looks great so far, looking forward to more gloss!
    1 point
  11. Another approach to clamping the scarf if you have plenty of excess to play with (as you appear to have in this case) is to use the wedge-shaped offcut from the end of the neck blank and using that as a clamping caul underneath the neck. The two angled surfaces end up cancelling themselves out and you end up with two parallel surfaces to secure the clamps against without them slipping apart so easily.
    1 point
  12. As far as scarf joints slipping when gluing, if you have enough extra width to your neck blank you can drill some registration pins in to prevent movement when you clamp. Looks like you were pretty tight on this blank, but for future reference... I've also used pieces of binding tape stretched across the joint to help with movement too. Better than nothing. My personal preference is to put the scarf into the headstock and use an overlay and backstrap, which gives you plenty of room to put your registration pins outside of the headstock area. But there's a lot of good ways to skin this cat, it comes down to what makes sense in your head and what you think you can most effectively execute. Looks like you got it worked out!
    1 point
  13. Probably a good idea. If you can get your hands on some heatshrink tubing it would be better still, but electrical tape would be good enough. I wouldn't worry too much about the rust unless it's particularly severe, in which case you're probably better off buying a new rod. Maybe put a few turns on the nut to test that the rod is working OK and not likely to fail in use. I'm not personally familiar with horn as a nut material, but I think I've seen it mentioned elsewhere as being used. Maybe do a couple of test slots in each and see how hard they appear to be when filed, or polish up one edge to see how it behaves when sanded at high grits? I wouldn't paint the bone nut black, as over time it will inevitably end up with paint chips on it and will require touching up.
    1 point
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