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  1. ScottR

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  4. Bizman62

    Bizman62

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/14/2021 in all areas

  1. And while that glue is drying we prep the top for glue up. I hope to get two tops, a headstock plate and a control cavity cover out of this. And while that glue is drying, I finished my body shape and cut it out. SR
    3 points
  2. Hello again! This one, I've been planning to build for nearly ten years. I was always a fan of the Warwick Infinity NT bass, and in a previous life I started building one back in the UK. I think I even started a build thread, back in the day, but I dare not go find it! I moved over to Australia before it was even close to finished, and left the project behind. After I got back into the luthiery saddle last year, I figured I'd grab some timber and give it another go. @Prostheta, it's happening... 34" scale length, 5 strings, 24 frets. Queensland maple and maple neck, walnut wings, flamed maple top, and cocobolo fretboard. MEC pickups and preamp, Warwick 2-piece bridge and hardware. Alrighty, timber shots! Ran the old rusty handsaw and jigsaw, depending on mood, through the Qld and Maple pieces and set them in my router sled setup for a solid thickness. Note to anyone who remembers my last build - I finally got myself a router! Hand plane over all faces, slathered with wood glue, and right into the clamps. Glued the wings on, and laid the template over the top for a look, before grabbing that old jigsaw again for some rough shaping. Scarf joint got done here as well, and headstock ears too. Rough shaped, and I'm starting to get real excited about this thing... See y'all next time! - Jam
    2 points
  3. Hey all! After my extremely low-budget build last year, I had a second wind and decided to do another one. Cash amount? Bugger all. I started building last year in August (I think?) and finished it within a few weeks, I'm only just getting around to posting about it now. The influences for the design will be very clear on this one, choices of material were directly caused by my lack of funding, and remember - I still didn't own a router at this point! Body's gonna be Meranti, which is readily available at local hardware stores - I think I paid about $25 for timber on this. As in my Blue build, I had to make two "layers" of timber to make up the thickness, as hardware store timber generally doesn't come any thicker than 19mm. Neck is a rescue - didn't have resources to build my own at that time. Cut a neck pocket and pickup "route" from the top slice of the sandwich, as well as the plywood top. Oh god, really? Another plywood top? The true mark of an unemployed roadie... Dry test-fit, then the whole stack gets glued up. Like I said, y'all, this one was a build with no money and enough time to figure out ways of making things happen without the correct tools or materials. Stay tuned for more fun and games! - Jam.
    2 points
  4. Man enters bar with three mates and holds up his hand. "Three pints, please and another one" "Ah" says the landlord, "Another guitar builder?"
    2 points
  5. This is true. I have never used a router to pattern cut a neck or fretboard. I cut it to shape after the fretboard is glued on and get it to final size and shape by hand. My neck profiles actually begin in the edges of the fretboard anyway, so there is not too much difference in time. Though not to the degree of @Andyjr1515 I have cut back on the amount of work my router gets. Pretty much only cavities. I used to use either the top or the body as a pattern for routing the shape of the other piece, but tired of chipouts in figured wood. Now it is carve and then belt and spindle sand to final shape. Besides, the older I get, the more scary routers become. SR
    2 points
  6. Next time I stub my toe on the leg of a chair I'll remember to yell, 'TWANG!!!' at the top of my voice. Or maybe I should use the Finnish word instead..?
    2 points
  7. I believe the Finnish and English words uttered when accidentally stabbing yourself with the end of a string are pretty similar in both languages
    2 points
  8. That looks amazing Matt! I'm looking forward to seeing if you picked the H that I did. SR
    2 points
  9. Yes, Strat players are probably well aware of the natural harping that occurs on the open G string if their guitar doesn't have a string tree fitted on the D/G pair. The distance behind the nut to the tuning peg is pretty close to the 5th harmonic on that one string, which then rings like crazy on open staccato runs. I've seen some players exploit it going back the other way though, plucking the string behind the nut to excite the 5th harmonic back onto the open string and then bend the string behind the nut to get some interesting pedal steel-esque slide runs. Metal musicians are often aware of the problem of harping too. High gain and staccato runs on open strings don't sit well with certain styles of metal, and you'll often see their guitars fitted with foam stuffed under the strings behind the nut or fluffy hair ties wrapped around the neck. Personally I could hear the differences between the long and short lengths of string behind the nut, but only on the lower strings. It was most prominent on the low-E long-string-distance example where the resonance as the note started decaying had a descending filter effect, giving an 'eeeeoooowww' after it was plucked (perhaps akin to @Bizman62's 'twang' he described and @mistermikev's 'bloom' characteristic?). The short-string-distance examples didn't have this effect. Whether that was due to the length of string behind the nut causing harping or some other byproduct of the way the string's elasticity differed between the two extremes I don't know. I did the stainless steel/nickel silver trial as I'd seen mentioned that some people didn't like stainless steel on their guitars as they felt it gave the fretted notes an extra metallic 'zinginess' that disagreed with them. That might still be the case when an instrument is played in a real life situation, but on face value from these tests I'm not hearing it.
    2 points
  10. In that case I recommend the 610 mm lengths from Madinter. Easy to bend to the desired radius and only two offcuts.
    1 point
  11. Why settle on mediocre when you can do perfect? There's two things for me to learn! Thanks for the heating tip, it totally makes sense. Hammering the posts in seems to squeeze out some sort of resin from the wood cells and after a while it hardens and glues the post in. Had I known the heating trick when I built the semi-hollow with the Ovangkol top...
    1 point
  12. That you are. This is a good tip and not the first time you've mentioned it....albeit maybe the first time in half a decade or so. I've used it many times since you last mentioned it. SR
    1 point
  13. Amen brother. Plus the old eyes aren't what they used to be, so how sure can I be that I know how far my fingers are away from that bit? SR
    1 point
  14. I made a Strat Copy with angle on the headstock so it didn't need string trees, bad idea!
    1 point
  15. Pretty much so but the spelling is very different: Auts! v.s. Ouch!
    1 point
  16. Exactly that, I just wasn't sure about the spelling of 'eeeeoooowww' so I typed 'twang' instead.
    1 point
  17. That's generally right where I'm at for clearcoats too. 70/30 if its really warm outside and I can get away with it (sometimes, not usually)
    1 point
  18. Honestly, I don't know, I have so many going at the same time I don't really keep track, I just kind of 'know'. Tho, I don't use as many as I use to, once I can tell its done, I stop. So figure on average from a dead-stop w/ a filled finish (CA glue here) with level-sands in-between, 7-9-ish. I learned the basic chord structures and jam box for Althea today, haha!
    1 point
  19. Yeah having a camera or two setup for my youtube series is actually really helping me to see issues with my technique. This gun doesn't give the ability to control pressure unfortunately, I can control paint volume and the fan size and that's all and I have to thin the paint quite a bit to get a decent fan out of it, or I have to open up the volume a lot which creates a tone of over spray so I'm mixing my lacquer to somewhere between 60/40 - 50/50 (just by eye) and getting better results with thin coats.
    1 point
  20. Love that wood combination, looks like an ice cream sandwich. SR
    1 point
  21. That's a stunner Drak! And the finish is brilliant as always. How many coats of clear did you spray? SR
    1 point
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