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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/18/2021 in Posts

  1. Yup, Warmoth. Nearly all my necks are Warmoth with a few exceptions here and there. In 30 years I have never once had a desire to build a neck, and still don't to this day. Just no interest, its a dead fish for me, always has been. AAMOF, a great and kind soul sent me a care package many years ago with all kinds of neck building supplies in it. Everything a guy could need or want to build necks. I never used any of it, so when Shad Peters lost his workshop to a fire that took everything many years ago, I sent him a care package with everything that had been given to me for neck building in it plus some other things I didn't need at the time to help him get his workshop re-started again. Better in his hands than mine., Further up the page you can see where I added the 'eagle beak' to it before the veneer. The side adjusts only come with the double-expanding truss rods. And those are always substantially heavier than the single-adjust rods. But once you get it on the guitar with everything else accounted for, I don't think many would notice. Thanks!
    2 points
  2. I had this in mind when making it, but I hoped the change would not be significant. It would move 10mm forward and I was thinking of it as if it were a neck pickup placed on a 24 fret guitar.
    1 point
  3. For some reason right now I can't like from my phone but I will go back and like and thanks that post for sure. Thank you so much very much appreciate it. Yeah I kind of knew that nature of you spread it on real thick just like with decal stock it's probably gonna bunch up and give you wrinkles but I would think like he said with a couple of light Coats I'd be great so thank you for that excellent excellent post
    1 point
  4. That will push the neck pickup closer to the bridge which may remove some thickness and warmth from the sound. I.e. the neck pu would sound more similar to the bridge pu.
    1 point
  5. Yeah. My headstock accessed trussrods have no more than what you show to hold them in place either....and they seem happy to stay put. SR
    1 point
  6. I had some old vinyl at home so I did a quick test last night. I wiped a spot with acetone and the left a puddle to evaporate. I did the same with lacquer thinner. and in a third spot I dipped my gloved finger into nitro and left a pretty heavy glop (technical term) on the vinyl. After the acetone had evaporated the vinyl was somewhat softer in that area, and the same with the lacquer thinner only to a lesser degree. A couple of hours later the vinyl seemed to be back to normal. The heavy glop of nitro took longer to dry and actually raised wrinkles in the vinyl like your fingertips get from soaking in warm water for a decent amount of time. By morning that vinyl appeared to be back to normal again as well. The nitro was sort of a worse case scenario, way more in one spot than normal spraying would leave.....but similar to what would be there with a run. I think with normal spraying and starting with a couple of dust coats it would probably be okay. I'll try to remember to take a scrap of fresh vinyl home and do a more reasonable test this weekend. SR
    1 point
  7. I wouldn't make a top for the headstock, but then again, I love that "racing stripes" look that goes across the whole body, and I'd definitely keep it that way, but to each his own. Nice progress so far, great job
    1 point
  8. Body work wise, very little is now left to be done (well, besides hammering in and dressing the frets). Carved the neck with one of those saw rasps + roughly sanded with a sanding block + 80 grit sandpaper. Such a fun and rewarding build step. I will carve the heel joint a little more, so the olive is a nice flowing curve from horn to horn. otherwise the neck is done. Got it to ibanez wizard neck thickness. Can't wait to brush it up with fine grit sandpaper and give it a satin finish. As for the headstock joint/volute, due to the way it's laminated, I managed to get this: I had a rough idea in my head how I'd want the volute to turn out, but this ended up better than I had it in my head The edges should get a bit sharper and be better defined once I sand it with finer grit, but shape wise, that's it
    1 point
  9. That would have been exactly the word I would have started my answer with. @JayT, consider this confirmed.
    1 point
  10. The bamboo and olive go together nicely, very organic looking. The purpleheart showing along the forearm relief makes me think of Gene Simmons' axe. SR
    1 point
  11. Logically thinking anything that evaporates does it faster when the temperature raises. @Drak already mentioned viscosity, which means the paint itself is more fluid when warm. Wasn't it you who mentioned keeping rattle cans in hot water to make the stuff come out the nozzle more easily and evenly? However, heating doesn't make paint any thinner, it just makes it more fluid. A thinning solvent is what makes cold paint more viscous which is why you should use it more in cold conditions. Thinking about pitch may help figuring or remembering this: As such it's solid to the point you can shatter a lump. When you heat it it becomes fluid so you can pour it over cracks in tarmac with a watering can and in a short while it will solidify. Yet you can wash it off your car with naphta which means you could make cold pitch liquid by adding a suitable solvent. And when the solvent evaporates you'll again have solid pitch.
    1 point
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