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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/01/2021 in all areas

  1. Wow, just wow. No wonder I have no interest in these kinds of contests. I don't have the boobs or botox receipts for it! You Sir, may be in Deep Elm Shit then. Re-Name yourself Tantric Sex God and post this on your front page. Should be good for a few dozen votes then...
    1 point
  2. Whoever runs that contest (IMO) needs to clarify and tighten up the entry format. The first thing I should see is a clear, simple, straight-ahead pic of a well-lighted instrument and nothing else. Not your sausage mitt hands, or your girlfriend's toenails, or your dog Scruffie, or your Yin-Yang poster, or your cool Hipster beard and trendy glasses. Yours is exactly that, a dead-perfect shot front and center, with obvious YT links to follow if interested. Perfect, effective, well-lit presentation, are you in sales? I don't have time to click on seven f-ing pages worth of links just to see what it looks like. I should be able to see what it looks like at a glance, then follow links if I want to see more. I hold the contest managers responsible for that, not the entrants. I saw some really cool and inventive things there. And I also saw many people who simply have no eye for design detail. I don't think you need to sweat the teenage chicks unless they have a huge following somewhere. Yours is right there with the best of them, from what I saw, but there are some seriously cool builds there. I didn't read the rules, please tell me the winner will be chosen by a respected group of fair and non-partial humans and not social-media driven.
    1 point
  3. Oh yeah, thanks for noticing-it helped be make my decision to not use this, but to save and use as a guitar neck instead. All of your suggestions were helpful BTW - even if I just stored them away for future consideration.
    1 point
  4. Actually I really did ... I also really like Scarlet Johansson, sadly both are beyond my reach at this point. Good news is that one day I may be able to do your suggestions. Not likely on the other front
    1 point
  5. I see you really liked my suggestions. LOL mk
    1 point
  6. I'm going to try to get wick in some glue (thanks for all the tips on that!) -- but for sure I'm not going to try and repair this with any wood ties or scarf joint. Even if operation:glue-the-cracks is successful I get the feeling just knowing its there I'll obsess that it's causing some imagined, phantom-like issue. Most likely I'll chop off the cracked end and repurpose this one as a guitar neck (this is/was a bass neck so I've got the length) for a travel guitar I'm planning to build next. I have another bass neck blank already milled, I'll be sure to work further from the edge this time as it has like 6/8 inches to spare --- and DRILL any holes I need for the fretboard glue-up
    1 point
  7. If you use an adblocker - uBlock Origin in my case - you'll have to disable it for voting.
    1 point
  8. @komodo you obviously haven't watched the Rosa String Works videos! Wick some water into the crack and let it suck the Titebond in. Maybe using a tiny drop of water as a thinner for the tightest cracks. A suction cup might also help. But you're right, thin CA will also wick in.
    1 point
  9. I can't imagine getting Titebond in that small of a crack. Thin CA will wick right in.
    1 point
  10. That's a solid plan. You can apply wax on the oiled surface for added strength and shine. I've made my own mix of carnauba, beeswax and pine turpentine, but any wood wax that doesn't contain silicone will do. Also, if you find that the oil finish isn't durable enough, you can apply the poly mix afterwards - it might even blend with wax as the formula is pretty similar but wiping with mineral spirit/turpentine may be recommendable just for sanity and cleaning. The poly mix will still have that woody feel unless you wipe on a hundred coats.
    1 point
  11. Oil is nice to touch, it has a very "woody" feel. It also adds some protection, the surface is a bit harder than bare wood. And it repels moisture to some extent. But it's not as wear resistant as poly. However, should something happen, it's relatively easy to patch unlike hard finishes and it can be completely redone when needed. I've finished a couple of guitars using Osmocolor oil wax. It's meant for flooring among less abrasive uses but it doesn't build a thick protecting layer you'd see on gym hall floors or bowling tracks. Our kid's room lost most of it during a decade or two, but our bedroom floor is still intact after 25 years. No shoes... I've also used Crimson Guitars Guitar Finishing Oil on at least one full guitar and a couple of necks. They have two versions, penetrative and building. For what I know it's basically a similar blend of oil, poly and turps as I described above. You heard the man! I took a look at Aliexpress and indeed you'd get a 20 cm/8" long radiused block, a full length neck support caul and a set of radius gauges for a few tenners. Hint: Adhesive sandpaper can be difficult to find in suitable grits/lengths/widths. Lay masking tape both on your block and on the back of the sandpaper of your choice and glue them back to back with cyanoacrylate glue. Masking tape is designed to hold without creeping and detach without leaving sticky residues.
    1 point
  12. I reckon you'll get a better and more satisfying result if you use a radius block. If you're going to go to the trouble of applying the radius to the fret board by hand using planes, sanding beams and radius templates, you might be better off putting that effort into making your own radius sanding block instead. A 44 gallon drum has an outside diameter of about 23 inches. You could stick some coarse sandpaper to the side of one and use it to sand a hollow into a block of wood that would yield a radius of 11.5", which is pretty close to your required radius of 12". Or just buy a premade 12" radius sanding block. They're pretty economical from places like Aliexpress these days.
    1 point
  13. Me neither. Do I see right, are there a couple less serious looking cracks as well? If so, it seems like the blank you got was not properly protected a the ends while drying or that a longer bit at that end should have been cut off. One trick for hammering in nails: Blunt the tips with a couple of hits of the hammer! A blunt tip will crush the wood in front of it while a sharp tip will act as a wedge. A short risk analysis might be of help: First of all, all fixes in the heel area will be hidden so you're free to do anything! Wicking glue in might be enough, a Titebond seam is known to be tougher than the surrounding wood A scarf joint after gluing will certainly be strong enough for any use. A set neck will support the glue joint as well. A bolt-on neck can easily be replaced if your repair attempts fail in the future. If you build for yourself that would serve as a test lab to see how good your fix is.
    1 point
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