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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/03/2021 in all areas

  1. So I finally finished this project and thought it might be fun to post the results here despite not being active for 10 years. Here it is in all its glory! As mentioned above it's walnut and maple neck-through. Finish is oil and wax. Closeup body. The top knob is a 4 way rotary switch (Bridge HB - Split Neck+Bridge - Split Neck - Neck HB). The other two are volume and tone. Headstock. The recessed tuners aren't by design, I made the headstock too thick to fit them and didn't feel like sanding it down. Back side. Some of the more visible mistakes. I took too much off of the neck and had to glue on a scrap piece. On the back the ferrules are uneven and I had to file two of them just to get them in. Also, mid way through the project I decided to change from having back loaded electronics to putting everything on a pickguard, after having already started to work on the control cavity from the back. I also got a bunch of wax stuck in pores and gaps. I've also broken three screws by not drilling pilot holes well enough! All in all I'm really happy with the project. I still love the design and it turned out pretty much exactly like I wanted. I think I'd maybe prefer a more glossy finish. Best of all, it's actually playable!
    2 points
  2. I don't think I'm too bothered about cleanliness. Hitting the region of the street next to the bar five blocks from the ballpark is good. Basically, a sealer coat over oxidised wood, then a black coat followed by a white coat. The choice of paint is what I am considering. Acrylic will be always-soft and maybe less "chippy" when relicing, 2k might be very chippy and too hard to "wear" easily. I'm thinking 2k for the speed of catalysed drying though, as that has its advantages for me. Pulling tape will be even more critical here, however since those tape edges will be subject to subsequent relicing, maybe not so important. Following the rough chronological treatment of the original and then extending that beyond '78 seems the target. I also managed to vintage-correctly torque off the heads of two trem screws, because you know, that's what Eddie would have done. Right? Right? Right. Totally.
    1 point
  3. Look at that! The 15 minutes I spent typing up that post are already worth it, thank you so much!
    1 point
  4. I very much appreciate that you took the time to show the finished product! Sometimes these just take some more time than expected... HINT: If your guitar is of open pore design and you get wax into pores, simply use a brush (clothes/shoe brush type) to polish the pores. If it works for waxing shoes shiny, why shouldn't it work for other live surfaces? That's what I thought in the same situation and the result was shiny!
    1 point
  5. i am making a youtube video to try and show how i did it. i will try the thinner top layer and see what happens. i do like the violent crackles!!!
    1 point
  6. And if the underside of the bridge plate is painted black remember to scuff off some of the paint where it will make contact with the grounding wire so you have a metal-on-metal connection, otherwise your grounding wire will not be effective for hum suppression..
    1 point
  7. Yes. You touch the metal strings which sit on the metal bridge which sits on the top with a ground wire pinced in between. Thus you'll be grounded to the same potential as the electrickery which eliminates hum. Use a thick enough multi-thread wire, spread the end to a fan for maximum contact. Some even put a piece of copper tape on the wood under the bridge to maximize the metal contact area. That might be recommendable if the wood is so soft that the wire would dig into it. In guitars with a tremolo system going through the body (like Strats) the ground wire is usually connected to the spring bracket. And in guitars with the bridge standing on posts like wraparounds and Tune-o-matics the wire goes to one of the post holes.
    1 point
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