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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/14/2021 in all areas

  1. I finally started to work on the replica I want to build for my Dad. It was about time because I plan to give it to him on his wedding anniversary that coming early August Here is my CAD model and bellow are some progress pictures: * I changed the logo on the pickguard to spell my father's name instead of "Hopf". I kept the same style of calligraphy. I recently found a schematic for the mysterious 4 positions rotary tone switch but I can't figure out how it works. I'm trying to reproduce it in CircuitLab and it don't seems to work like intended. Maybe someone could help me break it down? I can't figure out how there is only one resistor for a band pass and also I don't understand where ther "R. M." switch comes from.
    2 points
  2. Started this one at the tail end of last year, or early this year.. (That region of time is all a bit of a blur thanks to not being allowed to leave home) in the old garage for my friend Duncan. He's a big Big Country fan being a Scott of a certain age and wants something inspired by what Stuart Adamson used to play for a 60th present to self: I gave my usual it will be inspired by but not a replica response which he was cool with and we came up with this mockup. The thing is pretty much just a les paul with 2 spiky, symmetrical horns and it's a bit narrower at just over 12" wide according to the limited research I could do - there isn't a huge amount of information on them, certainly no templates. I mean why would there be, it looks horrible. The inlay is inspired by the Big country logo with a sort of negative of the original sg2000 inlay design, then he wants dots for the rest of the markers. The original is all white abs binding like a les paul custom but we're going for natural binding on the bod, maple binding on the fretboard plain old ebony on the headstock with my usual moustache shape. I got a couple of extra nice Bosnian maple billets for him to pick from which the mockup is based on and he said he didn't like the seam/chevron style figure (to be fair, most of the SG2000 aren't even figured maple) so I was scratching my head on how best to achieve what we both wanted to make and almost to the day Mike messaged me to tell me about his latest score, and after just a tiny bit of begging, he sent me a couple of one piece curly maple carve tops because he's an awesome dude. This was the lesser of the two tops, because you know (Luthier dibs) According to google photos, I created this album in Oct 2020, so I guess that's when I made a start on it and roughed out the top and an African mahogany body blank - I've taken to drawing around the templates with a 1/4" washer and cutting roughly to that line so I can glue pieces up oversized where possible to prevent glue dribbling into open grain at final dimensions. It's slightly more effort routing the final shape being thicker but easier on sanding which is my least favourite thing. BTW, I used illustrator to trace a pic of the body and printout out the design, transferred it on to mdf to make the template. No pics but I routed a channel in the mahog from switch to control cavity before glue up. At least I hope I did... I guess we'll fine out. Glued up and routed and did a bit of work on the neck blank (actually looks quite tidy for me). This is my first time using genuine mahogany - one of the old bed posts my dad gave me last year. That was as far as I got before packing it all up and moving. Fast forward to a few weeks ago, I routed out the neck shape and stuck the fretboard on. I rescued this fretboard from a dodgy glue up on Matts tele build (still unfinished) but I was able to reuse it here - the shorter scale and only 22 frets made that possible, Indian ebony is expensive so glad it wasn't wasted after all. It's a hair too narrow for the neck but that doesn't matter because it's getting a binding channel anyway. Then today I got the mahogany down to correct thickness. I've been getting rather blumpy with these lockdowns so opted for manual instead of the drum sander and got a sweat on. This is a new (to me) stanley no6 from ebay and an absolute joy to use compared to my cheap Amazon Basics and Faithful planes. I'm on a mission to replace them all for Stanleys when they come up at a decent price. Next up will be carving
    2 points
  3. That looks like Spruce topwood? It actually genuinely looks like what they would have used on a Saturn. Like.
    1 point
  4. I've always liked those Yamaha SG's Nice work so far
    1 point
  5. Nice work so far. Especially like the F holes.
    1 point
  6. That's a thing I like! Paying homage to the original without building a fake.
    1 point
  7. Good grief, Ich weiss nicht Yes I first figured this out with an acoustic pickup (DeArmond) that some other guitar playing dude gave me when I was working on the mines up north 20 years ago. I got around to trying it out...hang on 25 years ago...on my Washburn steel string...no 30 years ago....and I noticed...nah nah nah 35 years ago or close to it...I noticed the 1st and 2nd strings were a lot louder than the others. Here's a link which shows one with the second pole covered over https://gpguitars.com/products/dearmond-rhc-b210-acoustic-soundhole-pickup I noticed one of the guitarists from "Pentangle" using one of these and I'm sure he had Electric Strings on to fix the problem. I tried that on my Washburn and it pretty much just sounded like an Electric guitar!
    1 point
  8. The manufacturers often recommend to use a minimum amount of thinner. However, that's not stone carved as this article (which has been referred to in the PG tutorials as well) tells: https://www.popularwoodworking.com/finishing/you-can-add-all-the-thinner-you-want/ In my understanding "Mineral Turpentine Oil" is the same stuff that's on the video where it says "Mineral Spirits" on the can, There's also "Pine Turpentine (Oil)" which can be used instead - actually the word "Turpentine" originally comes from Greek "Terebinthine" which means "Resin" that's sourced from living trees. Pine Turpentine is a side product of cellulose industry. Mineral Turpentine acts and can be used similarly to Pine Turps which is why they can carry the same name. However as it has a low flash point it should not be used to thin linen oil paints because of the autoignition feature of linen oil. The Berger GP Thinner is just that, 100% MTO (Mineral Turpentine Oil). The Wikipedia article shows some interesting CAS codes when compared to the MSD sheets: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_spirit
    1 point
  9. In that case I'd be guided by whatever the manufacturer says their product can be thinned with and the ratios to which they can be mixed, rather than try and guess. Check with them first - maybe printed on the tin, the product page on their website or send them an email. Deciphering the MSDS can be a bit hit and miss, and that's not what an MSDS is really meant for anyway.
    1 point
  10. Mineral spirits is a generic catch-all term to describe a broad range of petro-chemicals and solvents. It means different things to different people in different countries, so it's not necessarily safe to assume that a bottle of something labelled as 'mineral spirits' you can get from the hardware store is the same thing Berger, Minwax or Watco state can be used to thin their products, particularly if those products are imported from different places.
    1 point
  11. Understood. If it were me undertaking a first-time project I'd probably just choose a product based on the directions on the can, rather than try to blend my own mixture by combining different products. At a basic level that means if you want to try a wipe-on poly, buy a tin of pre-mixed wipe-on poly. If the directions indicate it can be thinned with a particular product, then only use that thinning agent. Keep things simple for starters.
    1 point
  12. As you said they list a bunch of thinners or vapourizing agents making the product dry faster. Looking closely the percentages they don't come even closely to 100%. Does that mean that the main ingredient isn't harmful so it need not be listed? The Berger stuff tells that the main ingredient is Urethane Alkyd Resin and as it shows in the table it has no CAS registry number (which is for quickly identifying chemicals worldwide). It looks like Watco and Berger contain more of the "real thing" than Minwax. Thinners like Mineral Turpentine are very cheap so I guess Minwax makes a good profit with their ready mixed stuff! Here's some info about making your own wipe-on poly: As you see, the "secret formula" is even simpler than the Danish Oil!
    1 point
  13. I've used Minwax wipe-on poly before, both the satin and gloss varieties. They both work well and are easy to apply with a clean, soft lint-free rag. The trick to it is more about working out how best to apply the finish so that it doesn't leave behind streak marks or runs. Is there a reason why you're specifically interested in urethane?
    1 point
  14. true. this is only my second time doing it and what I've learned is that I hope I never have to do it again! seriously tho... maple is really a dif animal than ebony or rosewood -if it chips you are not going to hide it at all. I took great care to not pull any chips out... it was slow and a lot of work. ended up buying those step mac chip preventers and they worked pretty good altho I didn't use the sm puller - just heated em up and worked the edges slowly with a razor blade.
    1 point
  15. Make a couple of blocks with triangular gaps to fit your vise. Put a piece of rubber or similar tacky thin material between the knob and the blocks. Mark the center of the hole with an awl or other spiky tool. Use a brad point drill bit. Start drilling backwards to avoid tearing! Wax can be slippery. If you need to tighten the hole, you can carefully pry the gap of the pot shaft open with a flat screwdriver. Or you can drill a small hole on the side of the knob and insert a grub screw to secure the knob.
    1 point
  16. Cheers Muzz! While it is going to remove all traces of "slab", I don't think there will be any surprises......unless I get surprised too! SR
    1 point
  17. What someone (way more skilled than I) needs to do is install a permanent, rechargeable battery along with the guts of one those mini travel chargers .... and have a (beautifully carved wooden) collapsable/hidden crank handle.
    1 point
  18. I think you've found an old jello shot
    1 point
  19. That's logical. The phosphor bronze winding on acoustic strings isn't ferromagnetic while the nickel winding on electric strings is. The steel core is pretty much similar to allow magnetic pickups catch some sound but obviously not similar to strings with a ferromagnetic winding.
    1 point
  20. Love the free thinking discourse, it's a bit heavy-handed for what we have here. It's not even a build thread or a proper build really. This is not really about the guitar object itself, it's more like exercise. I'm negating other life stressors, screwing around, and having fun. I've got no preconceived notions, and no real goal other than to see what I'll do with the parts laying around here.
    1 point
  21. Ash's Panacea Spec Top: Eastern European quilted maple Back: American black walnut, 1 piece, ebony control cover Neck :Eastern European walnut Fretboard: Indian ebony, quilted maple binding (use up those offcuts), Abalone lam inlays, compound radius 9.5" - 12.5" 25" sclale, 24 frets, medium nickel fret wire. Finish: Pink + green stain, clear nitro on body + headstock, danish oil on neck. Nut: Bone Hardware: Schaller Signum bridge, Sperzel tuners, nickel with ebony knobs and buttons Electronics: PRS HFS + Vintage bass pickups, master vol + treble bleed, master tone, 5 way blade, mini toggle with tuned split on positions 1 and 5. Build thread:
    1 point
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