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  1. Prostheta

    Prostheta

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    argytar

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/17/2021 in all areas

  1. This looks so perfectly crafted that I kinda hate you a little bit
    2 points
  2. Hah! Yeah, those retroreflectors were a bad idea. They were installed with the intent of reflecting stage lights into the audience, however since retroreflectors send light straight back to the source (yay, geometry) they likely just resulted in a bunch of pissed-off lighting guys riding on the spots. My understanding is that Eddie used Schwinn paint for the red, which seems to have been a two-part process; a pearl undercoat with a translucent red over that. It goes some way as to explaining why so much of the black is visible through the red (more than normal since red isn't usually very good at block colour) and why it wore back to a pink in places over the white. The real reason is that I don't like the insta-relic that has become so popular. Brainless quick processes that really don't apply themselves to the way that wear and time work on a finish. If I were to go full on RWB Frankie, every single bit of aging needs to be done chronologically and in sequence. First, the wood itself needs to be aged. Then the time spent as a black guitar must be realised before the white goes on. That is to say, a little life will be added to the black before I stripe up and go for the white. Like a tree, the history is written in the rings between the layers. If you carefully relic a month-old guitar that's fresh out of paint, when you go in to the wood, you're exposing month old wood. Equally, the whole thing needs to work as an aging instrument, not simply as a fake 40yr-old guitar that continues to age exposing fresh non-40yr old interior. I like the idea of the ratty Strat that made it all happen. The RWB Frankie was just the one that caught the most of the spotlight when video killed radio.
    1 point
  3. Okay, here's a quick rundown on screw removal. There are certain caveats on making the process as invisible as possible. I didn't quite go down this route myself; I forgot that I had screws to remove before I shot the first paint. If anything this shows the limitations of the process or more accurately how it isn't always 100% perfect. Cut a ~50mm/2" length of brass tube with an ID larger than the screw. Chuck it vertically into a vise of some kind. Using a file, cut a series of triangular teeth with a flat facing "into" the cut when rotating anti-clockwise, or against the direction of the screw you're removing. Use a locating template with a hole cut matching the OD of the brass tube. Centre this over the hole to guide the cutter until it creates its own grooove. Drill anti-clockwise until the cutter has cut a hole deep enough to remove the guide template. Drill in several stages, cleaning out with a vacuum, compressed air or whatever. The cutter will not evacuate the waste, so you have to, hence the burning with me not doing this religiously. Eventually the screw will either work loose with the cutter or the plug takes it out entirely. The caveats here are obvious. If you're removing a plug from a part with a finish, the heat will likely cause issues around the cut. In my case the heat melted the shellac and took the thin base coat off, no big deal. To finish off the repair, ideally you need to be able to make matching plugs of the same wood as the workpiece with matching grain direction. Not always easy when making small 6mm diameter holes like this, as the grain would be across the plug and not along it! Let's see how that works out, however it's not a big issue. The repair will be under the tremolo plate and paint anyway. Either way works as long as the repair holds the replacement screw correctly. The teeth on my cutter were trash, hence the rough repair. I do this so seldom that I haven't dialled in the correct tooth profile to my mind. I aimed for a 90deg presenting face to the wood so that the cutter is more likely to cut than scrape. I still get resistance and burning within the cut but I suppose it could be worse, The cutter shouldn't take a lot of work to advance, and if it does then re-evaluating the toothing is worth the thought.
    1 point
  4. My paranoia goes one further than that. I drill my tuner holes through with the minor diameter of the post, then use the opposing pinhole left by the brad/spur to locate a larger bit for the bushing. That is absolutely only something you can attempt with a pillar drill and a clamped workpiece of course.
    1 point
  5. Drilled in the machine head tunnels today, I could not overcome my fusspot gene that does not like splinter exit wounds even though I know they are going to be covered by the tuners. The bushings are 8 mm. I drilled 1.5 mm holes through the template and out the back of the headstock, The point in the brad point drill bit is going to follow those from each side. Drilling about 9 mm into the top. Then I flipped the head over stuck the brad point into the 1.5 mm exit hole and drilled in untill I felt it just meet, Little doughnuts fell out of the holes. Next step is to rout that stuff that does not look like a flying V headstock away.
    1 point
  6. Thanks so much guys! It was pretty satisfying to try my hand at a high gloss again, it's probably been 10-12 years since I've done it. I remember why I stopped doing them (tons of work) but it sure does look purdy.
    1 point
  7. Vid is killer. More than once did I also sense a little Govan in there. @Prostheta I think you are bang on with the satin. Polished satin would definitely be better than satinized gloss IMO.
    1 point
  8. I'll post some pics later before I get the first black coat on to show the oxidised wood under the shellac. I'm starting with satin black so that I can see any problem areas (like that matters) and seeing whether I want to go to a gloss later or not. Satin polishes up to gloss anyway, so part of the distressing will be a general cut and buff to raise differences in apparent finish. That and I have a can of satin sat on my shelf.... I don't have speakers at work so I can't check that vid out yet! Still, at least I'm not working.
    1 point
  9. The really nice Yammy SGs are not Les Paul killers, they are Les Paul annihilators, this one looks well on the way
    1 point
  10. Hey thanks so much!! Thank you very much!!! I made the nut and installed the trem. Everything seems lined - up! This thing is loud man! I wonder how it sounds plugged -in!
    1 point
  11. 1 point
  12. I was staring at the top for 15 minutes totally stunned
    1 point
  13. 1 point
  14. That is an absolute stunner. Bravo! SR
    1 point
  15. See through metallic blue ! And a little teaser.
    1 point
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