Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Bizman62

    Bizman62

    Veteran Member


    • Points

      4

    • Posts

      3,339


  2. argytar

    argytar

    GOTM Winner


    • Points

      3

    • Posts

      171


  3. ScottR

    ScottR

    Moderator


    • Points

      3

    • Posts

      11,343


  4. Drak

    Drak

    Veteran Member


    • Points

      1

    • Posts

      6,226


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/19/2021 in all areas

  1. Put some strings on! Screwd the bridge on! Liked what I heard!
    3 points
  2. Alright @Bizman62, looks like you're right! I'm thinking this might still be able to be used for a top wood though?
    1 point
  3. Here it is much earlier, maybe 74-75. Notice the Gibson logo he put on the head stock. I'm not sure there was much play on it if any as a black guitar? Did he acquire the Mighty Mite body and neck, paint and assemble what we see here? Next pic is one of the oldest I've seen of VH. They're standing on grass! It really reminds me of my high school bands first legit show, very similar to this. I was stringing up the first guitar I'd ever built while everyone else was packing out to the show. I played it's first chords live for our first song, maybe 500 people and 15 kegs. EDIT: I'm not sure of the accuracy of the dates above. Watch this guys vids (he has many). He really goes down the rabbit hole.
    1 point
  4. I just noticed that I hadn't watched the previous video! Better now than never... You asked about clamps that push outwards rather than pull together. You obviously didn't know you were just holding one! Simply unscrew the top end and move it to the other end! The smaller ones don't cost much, you may even get them for a pound a piece. Another trick for future builds: Instead of small blocks take a piece of board - mdf, plywood, chipboard, whatever - large enough to support the router and make a template. You can easily support it with wedges even on a carved surface. Done that so I know! Oh, that came into your mind as well! I type these comments while viewing the video.
    1 point
  5. As @ADFinlayson pointed out in his thread, chisels and gouges are not the most efficient way of carving a top. But I think they are the most enjoyable way, definitely satisfying. And along with your impressive dining room set, Muzz, you've got quite a sophisticated vocabulary, something I've noticed over the years. Up here, we'd probably say the result was achieved (or will be) with elbow grease and sweat. SR
    1 point
  6. I've always admired your dining room table. And photography. SR
    1 point
  7. Remember the old computers? About 20 years ago I used to sell paper holders made out of plastic, one of the colours was named "Computer White". I don't know if it would ever get the wee-burned shade in sunlight like the monitor housings did, though. Anyhow, the plastic parts of computers seemed to yellow faster than the painted steel, partially of course because usually the case was hidden into a doorless cabinet in the desk, leaving only the plastic front affected to sunlight. The question is, how much difference is there in polyurethane paint compared to the ABS? Will it yellow similarly in sunlight/UV rays? This blog says it will: https://www.bowerpowerblog.com/solution-yellowing-polyurethane-master-bed-makeover/
    1 point
  8. I needed a good opaque solid red lacquer so I went lacquer shopping today. Nearly all my supplies are trans dyes with a few exceptions, but I don't have any solid red pigments. Big Apple Red. Perfect red for what I need. Its nice to know there's always custom colored lacquers right around the corner, even on a Sunday.
    1 point
  9. Next I roughed in the neck join and started in on the top. SR
    1 point
  10. A radiused top is a working solution. It both gives you the comfort of an arm bevel and helps to avoid pick scratches as it bends out of the way both sides of the strings. Just saying.
    1 point
  11. I'd wait for at least for a couple of weeks. Much longer if the conditions are moist! For what I've understood the humidity over there is very high at the moment so I'd wait at least a month, rather longer. Just so you know, crackling is made by applying another coat (often of another colour or finish) before the base layer has thoroughly dried. It's possible that wax would act similarly on semi-dry poly. If only the wax cracles, that can easily be buffed. But if the wax draws crack lines on the poly, you'd be sorry you didn't wait!
    1 point
  12. I went and get myself a cheap bench grinder from Screwfix which I'm very impressed with - I'm sure it's only a cheap stone that won't last long but it's very quiet and very smooth. I switched it off, went and made a coffee and it was still spinning why I got back I got a flat bit online. I'm trying to avoid using amazon where possible but it was the only place I could get hold of a 40mm flat bit which I thought was odd. Ground the bit into a radius on one side by eye, then I drew round it and used that as a reference to shape the other side. Tried it out on a bit of scrap and it worked really well. The only trouble was that I was getting a bit of tear out at the front and back - where end grain appears. So I sharpened it as best I could on my oil stone, essentially just took the burr that the grinder made on the back. Then did a second test, also this time extra slow, next to no pressure and got a much better result, end grain a bit rough but nothing a bit of 120 wouldn't sort out. I'm liking this method - much safer than a router, I can do it after carving and I can angle them if I want to by angling the table on the drill. I also got the pocket routed This is a nice bit of maple, hard to see from all angles but the flame stretches then entire width and perfectly perpendicular to the centre line. The only thing that's proving to be a real pain re centre line is that it's a 1 piece top and body so I don't have any seam to help me if I lose centre, so I have to keep redrawing it when I do something like carve the top or route the pocket. Carving with thumb planes is quite nice though, the grain direction is nice and predictable with no centre seam to throw me off.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...