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  1. Prostheta

    Prostheta

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  2. Andyjr1515

    Andyjr1515

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    Drak

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    curtisa

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/01/2021 in all areas

  1. Is Andyjr1515 going to meet his Nemesis? In fact, if I ever finish this - and to a state that I can enter it into the GOTM - I may as well call it "Andy's Nemesis" As these things often do, it started with a routine enquiry. Would I be able to build something with the body shape of the Trini Lopez Deluxe version of a 335? Didn't have to be a semi - maybe a solid-body, or a chambered thinline...any construction as long as it was the shape of a Trini Deluxe. For those who don't know, the Gibson Trini Lopez Deluxe was 335 based, but had florentine horns rather than rounded ones, had diamond sound holes and a fenderish/firebirdish 6 in a row headstock. Here's a pic of one: "Yes - I'm sure that would be possible. They are big, though. Would you prefer more like the 339 size?" Just to illustrate, this is a 339 size (think Les Paul) versus a full size 335 version: "No" was the answer. "Full size" "OK - no problem." "And could it have a Maestro Vibrola?" (that's one of these) "Don't see why not." "And the Steinberger banjo tuners?" "Yup - they're a bit pricey but they are back on the market" A side comment - they are also the best tuners I've ever used...and they were at one stage fitted as standard on the Epiphone budget version of the Firebird!!!!! "And a multi-laminate neck?" "Absolutely. Yes" "And can the top be ebony?" PAUSE "Ebony? Ebony?? Ebony????? Er...No! Apart from the weight - and this is going to be a mighty hefty guitar in the first place - you just can't get ebony in that kind of width." But I slept on it. Then did some research. And I was sort of right - you can't get ebony wide enough for 1/2 of the immense width of a 335 body. But you CAN get it a few inches narrower. Generally not all black, but hmmm... And what if we had a multi-laminate through neck visible at the top (think Aria's/Alembics and a few others - this sort of thing)? Then you could get something like this... And yes...that's an actual piece of bookmatched ebony because, yes, that's now my new project.
    2 points
  2. Ok, ok, here's a story of recklessness and restlessness. A few weeks before I started my last big run of work, I was looking at the pile of offcuts I had accrued underneath my staircase, and thinking about how I should really reduce my level of clutter in the household. That was really it, y'know, the whole thing is just a big clean-up mission, and definitely not because I wanted to build another guitar... First up, I had to figure out whether my offcuts were of the correct dimensions to start a guitar build. I had nothing wide enough, but several thinner pieces, so a 7-piece laminate neck it shall be. I've got Maple, Walnut, Oak, and Queensland Maple in there, and the whole sandwich should be long enough to do a neck-through. Got those bits all planed, trued, glued and clamped, and then sat down to draw up the plans. Now, I've never even owned a Flying V styled guitar at all, so we can mostly put this one down to curiosity. On the few occasions I've tried one out, however, I've always been seriously pissed about the inability to play sitting down. Not everything's a gig, man, and I practice seated! So I needed to shape the lower run of the guitar to accommodate for balance. The weird little arse-end was in part inspired by the LTD Arrow, but equally it just came about from the lines of the insides of the "V" coming together. If I'd just met them in the middle, it would've looked strange. The carves are penciled in at this point. I'm going for a single pickup, most likely an EMG 81 until somebody can convince me otherwise, and a single volume control. Wings are Queensland maple, fretboard will be Tassie Oak stained black, reverse headstock, and a 27" scale length for all that baritone badassery. Scarf jointing, by hand, with a tenon saw. With all the power tools and jigs available to me nowadays, I still feel most confident doing it slow and steady. Marking out all four sides and checking regularly is the way to go. Hate clamping up scarf joints though! I tried the salt trick, which helped a bit. And at this point, I'd like the drop the bombshell on thickness. Not body thickness, not neck thickness, but neck-through thickness....
    1 point
  3. The Barney Kessel Model came out in 1961.
    1 point
  4. How thick is that ebony top? Must've cost a small fortune! I wasn't aware of that particular variant of the Trini Lopez. I assume he had multiple iterations of his signature model over the years? The majority of results I get for 'Trini Lopez Guitar' in Google show something that looks more like an ES335 with standard rounded horns and a Firebird style six-inline headstock (also the guitar Dave Grohl from the Foo Fighters is associated with).
    1 point
  5. Thanks guys, I’ve been spending the day sanding the body and it’s now smooth as a baby’s bottom :)
    1 point
  6. Thanks, Scott I do like the finished result with purpleheart, but hate working with it. It is very hard, very dry and smells like a shotputters' changing room when the showers have packed in
    1 point
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