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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/02/2021 in all areas

  1. Using a pinpoint and sharp scribe as an awl is a good idea, so many parts of guitar making needs an accurate centre indent. A scribe used as a centre marker would be good to make a drilling template to ensure ferrule holes are in a straight line and evenly spaced. I tried out a technique to seat the truss rod nut into the channel on the practise neck first. The truss rod nut sits 0.8 mm lower than the rod ends, so the channel needs to be at least this much lower where the nut sits. Previously, I have deepened the channel there with a full size router, not a good idea. I tried my mini router with a carving bit To set the depth I put 1 mm cutting boards on the neck and lowered the bit until it hit the bottom of the channel and tightened the lock. Then took away the 1 mm spacers and routed with the Dremmel. The blocks of wood are clamped 28 mm away from where I want the extra depth route to end. It went OK . The rod at the headstock end now goes all the way in Making sure there is no rocking and the truss rod is sitting flush within the channel.
    3 points
  2. Of all the skills involved in luthiery, this is one of the many that I have little experience in. That doesn't mean I can't give it a shot though! I am rather hesitant of taking tools to this headstock to try and solve a problem, and creating one much worse, but then nothing is gained without calculated risk. I'll think upon it! Anyways, luckily I did remember to put that truss rod inside (although I sat bolt upright in the middle of the night wondering whether I had or not). Next job was all about getting the neck ready for carving, namely, thicknessing properly. A sled constructed of an MDF base and two pine rails cut to the correct angle provided a base for my router to ride along. Because of the size of the router base, I could only get to within about 60mm of that all-important heel transition, but I'll get the rest of that later with the grinder. So it's time to radius the board, using my homemade sanding block. Mask and gloves on - I don't want to end up allergic to my own cocobolo fretboard! Fret bending, with another homemade DIY abomination I call my fret bender. The paper clips are simply there as spacers to allow the fret tang to ride between the washers, which I could've made look a lot better by simply putting a smaller washer between the two bigger ones - but I forgot to pick up some smaller washers that day at Bunnings. Excuse my punk-ass looking device, but it works! Gave the slots a quick flick of the ol' saw to get the edges back to proper depth after radiusing, and starting whacking frets in. One part of this process I must convey - I cut the fretwire down to frets, drilled 24 holes in a block of scrap, numbered them, and then foolishly placed the block on top of the guitar body. When I gave the first fret a solid hit with the hammer, and all the frets flew out of the block and went all over the garden floor! Bollocks, guess it has been a while... Right onto neck carving. I tend to use rasps on sections at the nut and close to the heel, and try to get a solid profile. Then, I'll hold the rasp with a hand at either end, and push the rasp sideways down the neck. Not sure if this is a generally orthodox approach, but it does remove enough material to call it a very basic neck within about half an hour by hand. This shot shows the very trapezoidal look that I ended up taking. As much as I know I can remove material to "shape" a neck in a short period of time, I know that I have ample time to re-visit the shape. Besides, there will be a lot of sandpaper to see before this thing gets strings, so I call it a day on shaping.
    2 points
  3. Thanks! I ended up with a number of increasingly overdue small (and larger) jobs that needed clearing so I just got head down and got on with them. Took longer than I expected But still here, still crazy, still doing stuff
    2 points
  4. All of these steps are to get some midtones in the figure, which really increases the three dimensionality. SR
    2 points
  5. After 3 days of intermittent tomfoolery with the electronics…. the result is…. NEW GUITAR DAY!!! new guitar day!!
    2 points
  6. We used to have a guy around here that went by Bilious Frog.... funny how that name comes to mind. SR
    1 point
  7. A well set up tool is the key, powered or hand driven. One band saw at the town workshop even have the cast iron table twisted and the other one isn't much better - apparently they're good enough for the town carpenters to build pretty large furniture and things like doors. The band saw behind the wall belonging to a woodworkers' society is of the same age - all from the 70's at the latest - but it's much better maintained. The ½" blade cuts long stretches of perfectly straight slices thin enough for headstock veneers without any effort.
    1 point
  8. It’s fascinating to see these kind of nasty colors that I know will become beautiful once you are through with the process. I think its a sign that you know what you’re doing.. seems like magic to me though.
    1 point
  9. Good solution Muzz, nicely done. SR
    1 point
  10. THAT was the colour! I knew I've seen it somewhere! Well, it's over a quarter of a century since the farmer's daughter divorced me...
    1 point
  11. I know where there is a pallet of rough cut end sealed Cameroon ebony. The pieces all average two inches thick and 4 feet long in widths of 4 inches up to at least 8 inches. The price must rival gold, as I haven't seen any evidence of movement over the last 8 years or so. SR
    1 point
  12. Side dots are the bane of my existence... Why must a brad-point bit wander, on an uneven surface at an awkward angle? Why?? I actually had a close look at the headstock glue line today, and it appears that my veneer is thicker on one side than the other, just by a fraction of a mil. I'm not denying the fact that there is a glue line, and if anything this proves I'm even worse a craftsman than I was before, but now my plan is to double-sided tape a square of sandpaper to a ceramic tile and sand that headstock totally flat, and see what it looks like. If an even surface makes the glue line acceptable, I may just let it slide. If not, I'll take a crash course in inlay work and grab the Dremel! Thanks again for the advice mate.
    1 point
  13. I've not seen it done for a number of reasons....one is that there isn't any discernible advantage from making a neck in this fashion beyond uniqueness, gimmickry, etc. The second is that it's a technical challenge to drill a dead straight small bore through a piece of wood. One that doesn't appear to justify the end. Any wander and the truss rod will want to "act" in a direction different to that required. A straight truss rod can only act on a neck that is already bowing. It cannot dial anything "into" a flat neck with zero action, and will need to exert an excessively-large force to counteract any actual bow. I'd enjoy the technical challenge, because that's what I get the most out of. I fail to see the use beyond this though!
    1 point
  14. Glued up some wings from Queensland Maple. I got a huge slab of the stuff for my Infinity bass build, before deciding to go with Walnut for it's body wings, so after taking a slice for the neck lamination I had almost the entire board left over. I had to router-thickness it to 34mm to fit my design, then plane all the ugly router marks away, and do a bit of creative board-planning before the glue and clamps. Before I go too far forward, it's important to address the fact that my neck-through is far thinner than my wings - the core is barely 23mm thick, while the wings are 34mm. Purely born out of the stock I had available, this is now a major focus point for the guitar, and I'm going to build a super-thin instrument that doesn't "feel" super-thin. And, a box-cove bit makes the transition much cooler. Gull wings. Ran out of acrylic, so I went with 6mm ply for the templates, with the edges splashed with CA for a touch of extra hardness against the bearing. The tips were dauntingly fragile, so I went for a lot of passes, and somehow still managed to end up with a fair amount of burning. After worrying about the fragile horns on the body, I somehow managed to tear-out the headstock nub. Damn! As seen by the pencil marks, I decided to go for a re-shape anyways - sometimes, and especially when a plan comes together so quickly, it really does take disaster for you to sit back and rethink your paper plans.
    1 point
  15. They are aren't they? And they are approaching a nice shade of sun ripened cow flop. SR (really po(o)p sr
    1 point
  16. Nice find on that ebony! That's gonna look fantastic
    1 point
  17. Well, I'm committed to the colour choice now...
    1 point
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