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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/04/2021 in all areas

  1. That's a great idea! I'll be giving that one a go tomorrow. Also a solid idea. I guess, in the grand scheme of things, using a high-powered electric drill to excavate a few cubic millimeters of material can be quite the overkill. I'll add a pin vise to my list of goodies to buy with the next shopping run! Incidentally, I remember my father had a collection of those when I was a teenager running amok in his garage - he spent his professional life designing PCB's for microelectronics companies, and I understand the pin vise is also used for drilling out holes in circuit boards. Drilled the headstock for tuner holes using a 13mm spade bit, with sacrificial ply clamped to the underside. My spade bits are fairly new and thus still mostly sharp, but it's always a mission stopping vibrations from causing an oval hole. Now, Warwick's tuners seem to measure in at 13.8mm. I don't have a 14mm spade bit, and, more to the point, I don't yet have a drill press to ensure a non-oval hole. So I went with the safe option - drill a smaller hole, and ream it just a touch. Rolled up a sheet of 120 grit around a pencil..... Stuff it through the tuner-hole, and then remove the pencil. The roll of sandpaper now wants to unravel, and that keeps the paper perpendicular to the surface of the headstock, and making contact all around the inside of the hole. A coupla good strokes up and down and all around the place, and I've got a neat 13.9mm hole. The tuners now "click" into place.
    3 points
  2. Marked up the fretboard with my steel rule, calipers, square, and a sharp knife. I'm using Tasmanian Oak for this one. Couldn't find much in the way of resources about how this wood would fare as a fretboard, so I'm really taking a punt here. The hardness seems to be in the ballpark, although not as resilient as other species, and it handled the fret slotting saw with no splintering. With such a violently-shaped instrument, I couldn't do a normal round-over on the end of the fretboard. It's gotta look violent! Glued up, then I radiused it, and stained it jet black. Frets installed. And then I carved the neck, with my usual method of rasps and files, then scraper and sandpaper, plus a touch of angle grinding in just the right places. This shot also shows the whole gull-wing thing - don't quite know how I'm gonna fit pickups into this thing!
    2 points
  3. Now that's a real improvement! Before the yellow it made me think of the heraldry of my hometown but now it's something entirely unique! The blue fretboard would suit the theme but obviously you can't have it...
    2 points
  4. That explanation! I'm out of words, I can't even think what to say in my own language! The yellow with the bold black outlines definitely adds a childish superhero vibe, furthermore it accents the "night and blood" feeling of the black and red. It makes me think of The Mask entering Gotham City by night. For some reason there seems to be no "big" super heroes dressed in yellow, maybe because of the meanings you described for black and red. There's some yellow villains like Reverse Flash, some minor heroes and a bunch of masquarade party costumes - maybe a guy dressed in yellow spandex would too soon be called the Wee-man...
    1 point
  5. Thanks Biz. The time I've spent on this is both fascinating and frustrating at the same time. I can blow through a 12 layer burst relaxed and enjoying it the whole time throughout. But this has been really slow and cumbersome and extremely thought provoking as I contemplate every color and its affect on the 'big picture'. Ratios, proportions, too much, overbaked, not enough, what needs to be there and what works against the final look. How different colors powerfully affect the other colors around them. Nothing I've done on this was just 'tossed out', it was contemplated for hours upon hours. Tho to someone just looking at it, it may not appear such a thought provoking theme (yet). Not saying its anything great, but I have had to put more thought into this than most other projects w/o a doubt. Primarily because there's nearly no room for error. Spraying lacquer is not a great medium for changing your mind along the way. No Sir it is not amenable to 'eraser and edit' mentality. So everything counts, as layer by layer, everything must be 'a keeper', no room to caterwaul backwards down the stairs here. Some takeaways I've learned through sitting with, and staring at, this for so many hours: The 'North Star' (Belew's pastel schizoid-ish fun themed guitar) elicits a frolicsome scatterbrained lightheartedness. Mine, OTOH, could not have been more serious if I purposely tried to make it so, as it started out. Black and White is basically Life and Death, Yin and Yang, in proper proportions. A reasonable starting point. But all of Life happens between those two guardrails. Red and Black are the colors of Stern Authority, Power, Lust, Control, and Death...very adult themes, not very frolicsome at all. But something inside me really liked those colors, and the curve, I love the curve. The curve is what differentiates his from mine, the patterns on his being scattershot, the curve asserting control and a specific direction. So it has been a journey, to 'find the center' where they can meet, to bring together the adult power, and the childish lightheartedness, in equal proportions that 'get along'. So the 'gathering place' is the yellow, but you can overdo yellow really fast, yellow really needs some restraint, as its so powerful...a little goes a long way. Yellow is highly accentuated when black is used to frame it out, those two love to hang out together. I have pics of it before I put the black boundaries on it, I didn't like it nearly as much. I have decided so far not to intrude on the red or the black (tho I might by the end), so any new material 'eats away' at the white substrate, which I want to maintain a certain ratio of. I don't want to 'lose' the white as it gives everything else something to bounce off of. The white is the backdrop holding everything else in place. If the shoot goes OK, I should have some more pics tomorrow, I have the next step laid out, which hopefully will add in some 'fun'. The 'serious' side is already nearly too strong, so from here forward, the momentum is all pointed towards the fun and 'glitchy' side of it.
    1 point
  6. Thanks for the welcome, Scott! Yes, I believe I heard that as well. There's certainly many factors, including overall environment and type of wood. I would guess that open grain wood might dry faster than closed/tight grains (but maybe I'm completely wrong on that). Cutting might help dry faster so I don't need to wait another 20 years, and it seems @Bizman62 was successful with his poplar drying. I would love to talk about that with someone as experienced as you - I've seen some beautiful carveture* on the GOTM entry archives I've perused thus far. Admittedly, it's been quite some time since I have carved anything physically (moved away from the tools I had access to) and my focus the past several years is in the digital realm (sculpting 3D virtual models) - I'll likely play with 3D shaping in that manner to get ideas for curves and lines before making custom shapes out of wood - with the caveat that the wood may say something differently once it's being worked, of course. Which reminds me, I have some 15-year-old red cedar 4x4 offcuts I snagged from a deck and fence job years ago. Some are only a few inches long, average is about 5 inches I think, and I have one or few much longer. I grabbed them with the explicit purpose of carving cool stuff whenever inspiration strikes. They're in my attic currently, but I just checked on them quick and they have aged beautifully with a lovely tap tone.... and I believe at least 1 is long enough to make a neck(s) out of, so hyped about that potential now too! *carveture is now a word, because language is living and fluid. "All words are made up" - Thor, Avengers: Infinity War Interesting, curious how that works - fungus breaks the cell walls so water escapes faster? It's hard to tell if it's just the camera phone / picture-text compression, or if there might be some purple, green, red, and yellow discolouration, especially in the large piece. Thanks for sharing that experience - I was concerned that kind of thing might happen. Sad so much gets lost in the process! (Even didn't like how much wood would be gobbled up just from the thickness of a chainsaw alone.) Now I have a crazy idea to use some kind of hand saw and a mitre-box like guide/jig - because I'm crazy. P.S. - Apologies for the wordy/lengthy posts; brevity is not my strength!
    1 point
  7. '70's Pimpin' Superhero theme, take your pick. Speaking of pics, the Pickguard (which can only add to the Superhero theme) ...still not here yet. I put a little bit of white in with the yellow so it wasn't so super-dark yellow, not much, but effective enough. So now it's '70's Movie Superhero instead of 'Chuck E Cheese's Sunday Afternoon W/ Free Chicklets Party'. "Hey Kids, Remember to Bring Your Mom! "
    1 point
  8. Welcome James! I have heard that one year per inch was the rule of thumb for drying felled timber......but have no idea how accurate that is. I'm looking forward to seeing how the first build comes along. Very cool to start right with the tree. Sounds like you might have some carving experience too. We might want to talk about that sometime. SR
    1 point
  9. Cheers James! Transtint is way too concentrated to use straight out of the bottle. It only takes a few drops per ounce to get a fairly saturated color. In this case I'm using them with acetone, because it dries so quickly. I'm only using these to create contrast and then smooth that out a bit with midtones. The major color will be created by tinting lacquer. Acetone dries very quickly which can leave some streaks if you are planning to add the main color straight into the wood. Water is probably the best for getting even color and smooth transitions if you are trying to do that by wiping it on (spraying the dye mixture with an airbrush give the absolute smoothest). Alcohol falls between water and acetone in versatility. SR
    1 point
  10. This guitar is a twin to the one that won GOTM in May. That one was for a test drive to keep in my office for potential clients and this one I sold to a client. It has almost identical specs other than a rosewood fretboard, different color and pickups. Build thread is Here. Specifications: Name: Claymore Body: Honduran mahogany (maple veneer) with grain matched cavity covers. Water based lacquer finish. Neck: Paduak (maple veneers) with flame Maple binding and luminlay side dots. Tru oil finish. 25.5" scale length. Fretboard: Indian Rosewood with MOP logo at 12th fret. Headstock: matching maple with Wenge and paduak accents. MOP inlay. Frets: Jumbo stainless with hemispherical ends. Hardware: Evertune bridge, Hipshot locking tuners, Graphtech nut. Electronics: Bareknuckle aftermath set with camo finish. Push push volume for coil splitting.
    1 point
  11. Welp, can't have a month go by with no entries, right? This was my first "real" commission build - I sold some guitars that I built a long time ago, but never took someone else's design from the ground up and made it a reality, so this was a new experience for me. He's a big fan of PRS guitars, and his design choices obviously reflect that; it's the Custom body shape with a flat top, basically. He had a Strat with a neck he really loved, so I took some contour gauge and caliper measurements of that and duplicated the thickness and profile as closely as I could. Specs: - 25.5" scale, 24 Jescar stainless frets, abalone position and side markers. - Indian rosewood fretboard. - African mahogany body. - Curly maple top with natural faux binding. - Curly maple one-piece neck with 2x carbon fiber reinforcement rods. - Seymour Duncan Custom 5 and 2x Classic Stack pickups, 5-way blade, volume/tone/tone - Gotoh tuners. - Hipshot bridge. Didn't get a long demo recorded or anything, but this is what it sounds like through a 1987 Mesa Mark III+ And that's about it! Cheers my dudes.
    1 point
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