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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/09/2021 in all areas

  1. Then I level it off with 220, carefully and leaving tricky areas and final divots for later. I'll sneak up on those with 320 and 400. I already sanded through once around the horns. I touched up the dye and slathered a bunch more CA on. This made it more work to level, but more comfortable to level too. I did not get finished, so more of this next weekend. I swiped some mineral spirits over the matte to see what it would look like shiny....and not blackish. SR
    4 points
  2. Actually, you were quite right in your assumptions and concerns and it is my bad for not explaining well enough the spec - Yes. It is planned to be a full through neck. This type of thing, with the neck visible top and bottom, but with two hollow, ebony topped wings instead of the solid wood shown here: - However...and here I certainly wasn't clear enough... J's only stipulation is that the outline profile should be Trini deluxe-like (oh...and the ebony bit). He is happy for it to be any thickness and construction method I choose. So I could, if I wanted to, make it just like the above example with simply a thin ebony drop top or similar added to the top. - My plan (more like hunch at the moment, tbh) is that I do make it a slimline - I'm thinking around 1.5" to 1.75". The wings would be a pair of 0.1" walnut sheet semi-acoustic boxes, albeit with the 0.3" ebony as a top rather than the walnut. If my hunch is correct, I don't think that the wings will be much heavier than many solid-bodied electrics around, that tend to be thicker. The ebony top will also be hollowed and carved (admittedly a challenge in itself) which should take out a bit more weight - There are, though, some unknowns. For example, if I have to have to have a rigid periphery to the boxes to ensure that they don't warp, then that will add weight. The above may not work, of course. The advantage I do have is that - because the wings will be glue-on rather than integral as they are in most of my other builds - I can actually make the three components separately and judge if we're going to have a problem structurally or weight-wise while there is still a possibility of trying something different. As I say in my opening statement, this build may well turn out to be my Nemesis. But it'll be fun (for me and probably amusing for everyone else) to find out if it is or not. And anyone following this crazy journey, never be afraid to flag if you think I might have missed something...because the chances are that I probably have
    2 points
  3. Little more work done. Finished belly carve and started rounding the edges.
    2 points
  4. My bad. When I was doing the read-through, I thought it said multi-laminate Neck-Through. Doing the logistics of a neck-through using Ebony of that size on a body of that size (and depth) led to that comment. I re-read it back and saw it said multi-laminate neck, not neck-through. And, of course, the fact that you're building for a Paul Bunyan sized man was, of course, unknown to me. Carry on then!
    1 point
  5. I've sort of skim-read this thread, however I have a couple of points that may have been made but made me run right down to the reply box Firstly, the difference between quartersawn and flatsawn is not that great in terms of stiffness, and not always the same with all species either. The primary difference is that QS material will have vertical growth ring orientation which is most ideal for stability. Flatsawn invariably has more radius over the cross-sectional width which translates to a changing of shape when the wood moves. I'm an advocate for laminating neck blanks to orient growth ring lines vertically to approximate quartersawn even when the wood itself is not so. Secondly, if the wood is being slabbed then I recommend giving consideration to the centre board containing the pith. If the rest of the cuts are predicated off you keeping one large board that contains the pith running perfectly down its centre then you are maximising the log yield (for the most part) whilst producing one board that has more or less quartersawn-type growth ring orientation. Just cut either side of the pith board. For fingerboards, the growth ring orientation is not super important. You can cut flat for cathedral ring appearance or quarter for tighter linear growth ring lines. I would say that it depends on the wood and whether you are wanting appearance and/or stability. The stick and stack method illustrated is the gold standard. Good airflow (a slow lazy fan helps) and sealing the endgrain are musts. If you're going from green to 15% then get some good sealer for the endgrain. From ~15% to ~6-9% it's possible to use cheap latex furniture paint primer or similar since the moisture gradient is lower. Better is always better in most cases @Bizman62 - I think I know what your friend's recommendation was about, and it's right for the wrong reasons....or at least for a different end use. Fungi consumes the wood's sugars, deteriorating the walls of cells that regain or lose moisture from/to the wood's environment. Unfortunately, this weakens the structural aspect of the material much the same as torrefaction. Most turned goods are decorative, geometric (with rotational symmetry by the nature of the product) and not as structural as parts for a guitar. Their stability tends to be from the cosmetic end of the game rather than structural-under-load. Laying a log for a while reduces water content, but once fungi gets its claws/hyphae into the wood, the result is only that useful for decorative purposes in a guitar, such as headplates and tops.
    1 point
  6. Thanks for the tips and yes, you’re right. The lacquer was starting to dry before it hit the surface. I’m still somewhat dialing in the gun. I’ve increased the air pressure about 10 psi at the gun and reduced the spread some so it is rounder now. It’s allowing me to lay down a wet pass now. It was one of those Aha moments. I’m used to spraying with a standard HVLP turbine system when I was doing apartment maintenance for a living. Using a compressor and hvlp gun is a little different as it has more controls to it. I also wasn’t shooting lacquer thank you for the tips regarding the temperature. I’ve already run into having to deal with blushing as the final coat I applied Friday night blushed bad. Luckily the Mohawk distributor is open Saturdays and is five minutes from my house. I picked a can of their No Blush with Retarder and sprayed a light coat over the areas and then pushing was gone in five minutes. Have to say I am hooked on this line of product. I have had no difficulties with it at all. The vinyl sanding sealer is inexpensive and way easy to work with, the metallic base is comparable to auto metallic base that runs $125/qt., the lacquer is really clean and almost doesn’t need strained. Woodcraft sells the lacquer normally for $23/qt. The distributor can get me gallons at $36 per but I have to buy a case at a time(4). Otherwise it’s $50/gal. The last item I need to try is the aerosol lacquer which I’ll need as I still have to finishing to do on the headstock face. ha I’m already itch to start my next build. Same model, different wood and will not make the errors I did last time. again, thank you Bizman62 and I did t mention it above but I wet sanded with 600 to knock down the main sharp points showing through. And once I wasn’t getting resistance moving the sand paper with 600 I cleaned the guitar off and ran another sanding session using 800. I always use a block except for edges. For those I fold the paper enough so it acts as it’s own block on a shape like this I’ll origami the paper into a 1” x 4”rectangle I bend in half and run it single direction applying only enough pressure at any time with finishes to move the paper. That goes for dry sanding too. Learned a long time ago sandpaper is designed to cut using only enough pressure to keep the paper on the surface and moving. It works against the paper to apply pressure more Than that.
    1 point
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