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    Dave Higham

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/20/2021 in all areas

  1. Now I had to find a veneer to cover the bevel. First I needed to make a template. I stuck a piece of paper onto the bevel using repositionable spray adhesive and traced the outline with a pencil. A few years ago I made a bass ukulele (not the one further up this thread, another one) but only had guitar-size back and side sets, which left me with some large rosewood off-cuts. I stuck my tracing onto an off-cut and cut it out leaving about 3 mm all round. I sanded the veneer down to about 1.25 mm thick (flexible enough to bend easily around the bevel) and it’s ready to be glued on. Gluing the veneer onto the body was rather stressful the other time I did it. It has to be bent round the bevel and taped in place whilst it’s trying to slither around because of the glue and if I don’t get it lined up properly and the glue starts to grab I’m in a mess, so I thought of a way to try to make sure that didn’t happen . I used my paper template to trace the outline of the bevel on the inside of the veneer. Then I stuck 5 little blocks of softwood cut at 45° onto the veneer with just a tiny dab of glue. These should enable me to position the veneer on the bevel perfectly (I hope!) Hope there’s enough tape on there. Fingers crossed. Tape off. It looks to be OK. After some VERY careful trimming, especially at each end where the veneer tapers down to nothing, with spokeshave, chisels and cabinet scraper it looked like this.
    3 points
  2. Hm! No flies on you Mister @Prostheta ! B But I'm afraid I don't have a spare Telecaster at the moment .
    2 points
  3. Good that things are back on the move. How thick is the headstock? Unlikely that you will have sanded it too thin just reducing the burst....
    1 point
  4. wow, some lovely joinery going on there. bravo.
    1 point
  5. Wow, this looks absolutely gorgeous. Fantastic seeing the work going into your jigs and templates too, they look as good as many people's finished pieces! Ha ha
    1 point
  6. Holy Moses! That bevel is stupendous - they often seem to have a discontinuity point or two at the ends but you've managed to get the curve of the binding continue without any corners. It almost looks like there's an offset lower bout casting a shadow left to it! Wow, just wow!
    1 point
  7. I'll be paying the man good money for any more reclaimed timbers he can throw my way. Only problem is, being the kind hearted man he is, he thought it prudent to grind off all the nail heads sticking out of the timber, so I don't cut myself.... And now I can't remove the nails! Bless the man, but probably half of that chunk of wood can't be used, for fear of wrecking blades and bits. But still, that makes about half a dozen fretboards! Very little work lately. I've been downgraded from a covid "close contact" to a "casual contact", which means I have freedom to do grocery shopping again, but not much else. And the weather's been fairly crap, which has dissuaded me from venturing to the end of the garden. What a week. I did rout the pickup bay, though. Every time I make a new template, I eff it up and have to do it again. I'm aware of all the jigs that use a few pieces of factory-edge timber, but every single time I end up going: ah well I'll just make this one out of MDF with a jigsaw and files, then I'll do the rest properly. Never again. Route came out pretty good. Just need to chisel out the "ears" a touch to make this Duncan Distortion fit. Because we're all locked down, and the postal service here has quite literally fallen apart at the seams (along with public transport), I was getting quite worried about procuring the correct items for finishing this guitar. But then, I received two packages in the mail the other day - a can of oil, and two different flavours of "Prooftint" stain. Here be a test patch.
    1 point
  8. The neck blanks winging their way to me from Germany measure 870 x 100 x 31 which is more than adequate for two necks. The plan is to thickness these down to the 25mm required for the neck (based on the heel depth) and reduce the part scarfed to the headstock to enough that it supports a volute. At the very least I'll do a volute on one of these necks, the Mirage having had one originally. The choice of to-volute or not-to-volute affects the mounting of the locking nut slightly, mostly in planning to get a neat crisp pair of recessed mounting holes at the back if I go that route. 100mm isn't wide enough to produce a headstock scarf without glueing on at least one wing. For the Invaders build, the neck blank will be laminated with 2x 5,5mm Bubinga laminates. Losses from the table saw and rejointing will lose maybe 9mm so we're more or less still at 100mm either way. The central Maple laminate will be lightly tapered in proportion to the neck's overall taper which I'll work out at a later stage. This will again lose a little from the width at the headstock end. The Bubinga I have isn't long enough to support lamination through the entire blank, so these will stop at the headstock with that being plain Maple. In other news (apologies if this is slightly OT) I was heartbroken when I found photos of my old ESP from the auction site. Firstly, it was sold WAY undervalue and I would have picked her back up for several times that had I known. Secondly, she's been beaten and damaged. I just hope she's found a better home than a few hundred pounds might indicate.
    1 point
  9. Thank you. Actually it's a guitar. Those are pilot/locating holes which were opened up (and two more added) for the tuners. On the other hand, this is a bass ukulele.
    1 point
  10. I test fitted the pots and switch and found that the top at 6.3mm was too thick. So I routed the control area to 4mm thick from the back. The drop-top was glued onto the body and trimmed flush but I seem to have forgotten to take any photos. This happens from time to time. I just get involved with what I’m doing and forget about the photos. Anyway, it's beginning to look like a guitar. I wanted to leave the top its natural colour so I decided to bind the front rather than leave ‘nekkid’ and I thought I ought to do that before finishing the back. Trouble is, I didn’t want to use plastic binding and bending the E.I.Rosewood I have is a bit of a problem. I have a home-made 'Fox'-type bender but the Tele shape doesn't really lend itself to that, and I don't have a bending iron. I have a piece of steel tube about 3" diameter with a halogen bulb inside it, but that's no good for the tight curves on a Tele. So, lacking a suitable bending iron, I decided to try a different method. I’ve bent smaller bits of binding, for head plates by dropping the piece of binding in boiling water for a few minutes and then sandwiching it between two forms and drying it out quickly in a low oven. Like this The binding kept its shape perfectly and finished up like this. I had to make two jigs, one for the treble side and one for the bass. This is the one for the treble side in its open position. Here it’s closed. The centre section gets pressed down first, then the ‘horn and the lower bout. The centre and lower bout are common to both jigs. This photo was taken before I re-worked the inside form to allow for the thickness of the binding. I painted the binding with ‘Supersoft 2’ and wrapped it in cling-film overnight. The next day I found a piece of copper pipe with a cap on one end, slid the piece of binding into it and filled it with boiling water. I left it in there for about 15 minutes changing the water a couple of times. Then took it out, placed it on the former and clamped it to death. This was the bass side. Once clamped, I warmed the whole thing up with a heat gun and then sat it on a radiator and left it overnight (it wouldn’t fit in the oven). It seems to have worked. There was a fair bit of spring-back but it’s easily pushed into the right shape. I left them on the formers until I installed them. You may have noticed there’s a third piece of binding. I’ll explain what that’s for later.
    1 point
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