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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/06/2011 in Articles

  1. So you’ve decided to launch yourself into the world of CNC machining. You’ve done some research and lurked around many online forums and resources looking for information regarding which model to choose and what features the unit needs. You’ve plonked down your hard earned cash and a big cardboard box has arrived in the mail containing a bright, shiny new CNC router. It’s been assembled and set up on your desk. Now what? Fundamentally, most basic CNCs will have a bed which workpieces are secured onto and a overhead gantry that travels the length of the table. Onto this gantry a second
    4 points
  2. Recently I made the decision to step into the world of CNC routing machines and augment my small workshop and tool collection with a modestly-sized unit. With the rise in quality of low-end Chinese-made machines in recent years it has become easier than ever to purchase a small CNC router for home use capable of high precision. A quick search on online auction sites will reveal a vast array of pre-assembled units for sale starting in price from less than $700, with cutting beds up to 600mm x 900mm in size. While I am still a novice at CNC, hopefully my experiences can help others decide if tak
    3 points
  3. Fundamentally, two types of guitar neck construction exist; single and two-piece. In a single-piece neck the headstock is cut into the same piece of timber as that of the rest of the neck. In a two-piece neck, a separate headstock part is joined onto the longer part comprising the greater length of the neck using a scarfed joint. Origins Of The Term The term "scarfed joint" reaches back to traditional timber building and ship construction to denote a type of joint used to produce a long piece of timber where one single piece would not otherwise be possible. The joints themselv
    3 points
  4. No two workbenches are created equally, and a surprising number of details fundamentally alter their suitability despite (what might at first seem) superficial differences. Of course, a humble Black & Decker Workmate might not easily be comparable to a 16ft French-style Oak bench or even the dining table, however they can all be examined using the same criteria of, "what is useful to us as luthiers?". I think we can agree that this is far from ideal for working during winter on the patio (Source: Black n Decker) Go and do a quick Google Image Search for "luthi
    3 points
  5. Laser cutting takes what we engineer at the desktop and brings it out into the real world. For a luthier, this enables creating our most common working tools - router templates - to be made simply yet precisely. A real game changer! Translating creative or technical design work into router templates opens up a world of design options. Anything from an accurate outline of your body/headstock, pickup and electronics cavities, through to complete modular templating systems for recessed tremolos, etc. Powerful desktop design tools and laser cutting takes your building to the next creative and tec
    2 points
  6. Two bearings are better than one - if the length of your bit shaft and router collet safely allow it.....add another. This 19mm/8mm shaft Luna Tools bearing-guided template bit from neteberg.eu is a prime candidate for an additional bearing. The code for a 19mm OD, 8mm ID shielded bearing is 698ZZ. A few of these cost a couple of Euros. A bargain considering that one "official" bearing costs €6! The collar was loosened with an Allen key and removed. Now's a good time to clean up your cutter and existing bearing. Wipe off any excess packaging machine oil from the new bearing with an a
    2 points
  7. Hot off the press from G&W in Portugal is this compact solution to rough-radiusing fingerboards quickly using your router. Machined from CNC-cut aluminium with a black anodised finish, this jig is designed to be tough and precise like a good shop tool should be. The jig consists of two parts; the sliding router base and a lower sled. The base rides over the top of the sled, indexed off the radiused guides whilst the sled is designed to move back and forth over the fingerboard. The complete jig is available in the most common radii (7.25", 9.5", 10", 12" and 16")
    1 point
  8. After going through the StepConf Wizard to set up our CNC router LinuxCNC will have created a shortcut on the desktop to allow us to run the CNC machine with our configuration. Double-clicking this icon will launch Axis, the default graphical user interface. Upon opening Axis the user is presented with a 3D representation of the physical machinable cutting area of our CNC machine. A default test cutting program is loaded on startup featuring the LinuxCNC logo and a small cone object in the preview window represents the position of the CNC cutting tool. The maximum bounds of movement of the CNC
    1 point
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