Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. Prostheta

    Prostheta

    Veteran Member


    • Points

      94

    • Posts

      15,030


  2. ScottR

    ScottR

    Moderator


    • Points

      60

    • Posts

      11,510


  3. Bizman62

    Bizman62

    Veteran Member


    • Points

      55

    • Posts

      3,626


  4. mistermikev

    mistermikev

    GOTM Winner


    • Points

      47

    • Posts

      3,881


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/02/2021 in Posts

  1. "The Twang Master" Woods: bookmatched flamed maple top, bookmatched flamed maple fretboard, bookmatched flamed maple headstock overlay, bookmatched ash body, birdseye maple neck. specs: 25.5" scale length, 9.5" - 12" compound radius, 1.625" bone nut, 6.1 lbs final weight. hardware: gotoh in tune compensated brass saddle "cut back" bridge. gotoh 510 21:1 magnum locking tuners. seymour duncan vintage stack pickups. allied luthier double action truss with maple sheath, this is build #8 for me... built in my modest garage. my background - I am a humble student of google guided by many here! special thanks to the forum -many members here were an active part of this build from inspiration to feedback to helping me keep my machines running and I must acknowledge that first and foremost! Many learning experiences on this build... first time cutting my own fretboard, first time bookmatching my own top, stuggled at many points along the way and the members here always there to catch me when I'm about to fall and/or encourage me when I feel like giving up!! This build was done for a friend of mine - kevin. He had been asking if I'd build something for a while and I finally gave in... this is the result. what makes it special? well the most unique features in my mind are the bookmatched fretboard, the unique design of the neck heel (profile goes right up to the attach point), truss access through the fretboard, and the radius'd top/cavity/back. build thread: video demo:
    5 points
  2. Well, it's starting to look like a guitar at last. I finished off the binding with some maple and ebony offcut. Bent on the side-bending iron and then using the iron-on veneer method as with a number of my previous builds: And then onto the pickup chambers. As many of you know, I hate routers, but for this job they are jolly useful. Nevertheless, I minimise the amount done with the router and only use it when it is fully captive. The wide range Mojo pickups have narrow fixing tabs and so may well be solid fixed. There may be a covering ring of thin ebony, or maybe not...whatever Jack prefers. Again, I've gone over my slightly unconventional method before but, in brief: I mark out the external lines and drill the corner radii: I hog out with a Forstner (hand held as the 335-size body is too wide for my small drill-press): By the way, that is a continuous multiwood strip - stretched out it's over a foot long. Those Fisch Wave forstner bits are something else! This next bit is where I drift away from the conventional - the use of routing templates...but I hate routing templates even more than the pesky router itself. So I chisel up to the external line down to around 5mm from the top: And now, with the top-bearing router bit totally captive, use that to tidy the sides up to the chiselled line and rout down to the final depth: And, with just a bit of chisel tidying to do, we have a couple of chambers: Next job is fretboard taper, fretting and binding
    5 points
  3. Hey everyone, Build 1 is now done and dusted, so I'm moving onto build #002. This one is going to be a 30" scale bass guitar, EMG active pickups, Gotoh 4-in-a-line tuners and a Hipshot bridge. These are all parts I bought back in about 2017 to build a bass, but got sidetracked and never got it done. The timbers are all Australian, which was something I was really keen to stick to. The main body blank is Bunya Pine (not actually a pine, but looks similar), body cap is Queensland Maple, with a 2mm Tasmanian Blackwood veneer going in between. Neck will be Qld Maple. Fret board is Gidgee (a desert acacia species). I'm foreseeing at this stage that the whole lot will be Tru-Oil finished - I want to let the timbers shine on their own in this one. I've been trying to do a lot of front end loading on this one to try and make the build quicker than number 1, so I've designed the shape in Inkscape vector software, then designed the hard points and all the cavities in AutoCad. I've also bought some new tools (thanks, day-job bonus!) to help speed the job up as well, the key ones being a spindle sander which has already arrived and seen some duty, plus also a 14" bandsaw which is on the way.
    4 points
  4. OK - I think we are on the final furlong With grandparenting duties done for a few weeks I have a fairly uninterrupted run to finish this off. Jack and I have been doing some work on the headstock arrangement and he has come up with a shape that I think works beautifully. It gives a respectful nod to the original but is its very own. This is a mockup, but later today I will be cutting and gluing on the actual ebony plate. At the same time, I've been experimenting with some ebony offcuts from the top wood to see how well a 'no finish, just sanding & buffing' approach (think violin fretboard) works. The trials went well and so I did a quick and nasty to see how it works on the whole top. I know beauty is in the eye of the beholder but...I reckon it works
    4 points
  5. 3 months since I've touched Tom's singlecut. I can't remember if I mentioned above but some utter dick head installed the 12th fret inlay on the 13th fret, so he dug the inlay back out, playedned the fretboard off and did it all again. Started working on the body by routing all the waste mahogany off the back so it's down to 31mm, the top is only 17mm on this one because I had so much movement to level out prior to glue up and I normally shoot for around 48mm on my carve top solid bodies. Drilled pilot holes for the controls then spent an hour or so on the first part of the carve. Mostly with a 1/2" no6 gouge and sometimes a 3/4" no5 Did a bit more carving and thought ah crap I marked out those pot locations back when Tom said he wanted a Schaller Signum, he's since changed his mind and I got him a Tone Pros tom and tailpiece. So I lined everything up and saw if I had a problem. Consulted google images on pics of Les Pauls, Nik Hubers and Patrick Eggles and I think I can just about get away with it, I just wont have to go too crazy on the pot recesses. And after a bit more carving and the formation of a couple of blisters, I decided to call it a night I need to put the break angle in before finish the rest of the carving and will do that on the drum sander. I don't think I've ever carved a top that I haven't bled on.
    4 points
  6. I realise that most of the interest here is in electric instruments but I seem to remember seeing the odd acoustic in the dim and distant past. There's Ash's rabbit hole, but he seems to have disappeared down it The acoustic in question was made for my nephew and finished in 2017, so it's not a new project. It would be quite a long thread with a lot of photos. So what do you think? (I could do an electric afterwards).
    4 points
  7. So I've had my shed days for the week, all done and dusted. Very happy with the progress. The 6 P's really helped with making good progress... Prior Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance! I spent the time making the templates and using my drawings and the end result was some nice and clean pockets. Quick list of progress, then I'll just dump in photos. - Qld maple cap joined onto 2mm Tassie blackwood veneer, jointed and glued into a single cap - This guitar will have a face mounted output jack, so rather than have to carry around a right angle adaptor for the straight end leads I've got to suit my other guitars, I've made a sneaky little adaptor holder. I had to sink in a blank jack from the top - Wiring channels routed into the top side of the body blank, then cap glued on - Body trimmed to shape minus 1mm sanding allowance to go - Cavities routed in the back Next up will be sanding then doing the contours. I'm still waiting on the truss rod, so can't really start on the neck yet, unfortunately.
    4 points
  8. Too right they are! There is a great sense of satisfation in making them, that plan looks terrific. Looking forward in seeing the plan put into practise. Cheers Mike, the fret end files certainly makes short work of this task. I think the feel of the neck is one of the most important things for a guitar. When the neck feels good it inspires you to play the guitar for hours, so that edge is definitely getting a round over soon. Oh believe me it needs it, I could use that neck to slash through long grass at the moment. But currently I am taking the sharp edges of the fret ends and making sure the tangs don't protrude. And there is just time for another lizard photo, pull my finger
    4 points
  9. Dosesn't matter about the déraillement. It's my thread and I'm the one who quoted Voltaire. When I show my wife (who is French) something I'm making, saying 'there's just that bit there that could be better', that's what she says. What she means is leave the bl***y thing alone, you'll probably go and ruin it!
    4 points
  10. I bought a standard Tele pickguard and modified it to a Merle Haggard-ish shape. The horn is slightly different and I cut it straight across the bottom. I don’t think Tele pickguards were really meant to provide protection from picks. They were there to cover up the routed slots for the pickup wiring which is why they are cut round the bridge and the control plate but I don’t need to do that. It’s held on by black screws (I prefer them to chrome) which almost disappear. The bridge, tuners, control plate and knobs are all Gotoh in Cosmo Black. The finish is Osmo satin Polyx Oil. It’s supposed to be for floors and furniture so it should be reasonably hard-wearing. Spruce doesn’t need pore filling but I decided not to fill the khaya either. The Osmo, after several wipe-on wipe-off coats, half-filled the pores and gave a finish that I quite like. Thanks for watching. Dave.
    4 points
  11. The carving continues. Still more to go, but starting to hone in on it
    3 points
  12. Made one! Not tried it out yet, but will soon.
    3 points
  13. Haven't had much time to work on it lately, and when I've had time, it's been little at a time, which has for sure made me a little sloppy as I've wanted to get something done when I get time here and there. But all the sloppiness is invisible, so not that big of a deal. Hogged out the pickup cavities with a forstner Routed, quite sloppily, I only have the long pattern bit so I needed to prop up my template with some mdf, and I did not align the template thoroughly enough (and at one point I didn't fasten the mdf well enough so it slipped a little. I decided to just route ca 16mm deep pockets and then hog out a little more for the pickup legs. I did that with the forstner, but I wasn't close enough to the wall of the cavity so I cleaned it up with the router. I had a suspicion that the PUs would fit as the only pattern bit I have has a diameter of 16mm, so the corners had a big radius, and they did indeed not fit. I decided to use a 6mm bit and use the shaft against the template. That worked okay. I made a mistake when routing the extra depth for the PU legs for the neck PU, I took it much deeper than required, which in turn unnecessarily removed some gluing surface for the neck tenon. I realized that about 2 minutes too late. I needed to drill a little for the PU screws for the neck PU. Neck in the pocket I then re-planed the 2 degree angle into the neck as it was a bit off after sanding twist out of the neck, as mentioned before. I must not have tightened the fastening thing on the plunge router when planing, and I wasn't using the depth control screw thing either, so at one point, the tightening gismo vibrated loose and the bit plunged into the heel. Luckily, it was not so deep and it looks like I was lucky enough with the location that I can remove the error when I do the final heel carve. I then started sawing out the excess in the top part of the heel, and I was using a really crappy saw with a really "bendy" blade, and I don't know why I persisted so long after it was clear that I was just causing damage. Thankfully, at some point I pulled my head of my behind and stopped, took the neck to the router sled and routed the excess away. Definitely some ugly saw marks left there, but no one will ever know (well except us ) I've left some wood there on the left of the pencil line the neck, I will remove that later once the fretboard is more or less complete so I know exactly where to cut, as if I saw too much, it will be visible on the sides. Next up are is the control cavity, I've designed and 3d printed templates for routing. I wanted to see if I could save some plastic so I printed the template for the cavity plate recess, and then printed what would essentially be the ledge for the plate to sit on. When I will route the cavity itself, I will insert the white ledge part into the other one, and when routing the recess/ledge for the plate, I will remove the white part. I think it will go well. Here's essentially what I mean with a top view The cavity is definitely a little tighter than on the ESP explorers, but it seems similar clearance for the pots as on e.g. LPs so I think it's fine. I plan on soldering together a harness anyway outside the cavity and then placing the harness inside, so it's not a problem. I also put drill guide holes for 4mm magnets on the ledge part.
    3 points
  14. The Green Anaconda 25.5" scale maple neck, ash body, rosewood board, stainless frets. Fishman Fluence Modern pickups, Schaller tuners. This is my fifth build, made this for the bestman at my wedding as a gift for being such a big help. Started building guitars this January in my own small shop.
    3 points
  15. One clarification. I was speaking of graphic design on a professional level, where iteration isn’t usually versions of the same thing. Rather, it’s a whole bunch of divergent versions/ideas/looks (additive), where each may then may be iterated on (additive), and then refined (subtractive), and only the best are chosen to share (subtractive). Often, this is only the first stage. It may be repeated over and over. Sometimes in our office when you have left it all on the table - blood, sweat, and tears - feedback may be “that’s a good start…”. And it’s back to the well for all new fresh work of the same thing. And, this is all pre-client. Clients are brutal in their ignorance. “that’s it?”
    3 points
  16. We're still fine tuning the shape of the headstock, but it is likely to be in the Firebird/Thunderbird ilk. The original Trini Deluxes seem to have had a number of variations but most appear to have had something like the Firebird. This will be fitted with the Steinberger banjo replacements so, within reason, the wood can be any shape. Also the neck carve is basically done. Jack took me some profiles from his favourite playing guitar and I've used those to try to gain a familiarity of feel with this build. I use a combination of spokeshave, micro-plane blade and cabinet scraper to creep up towards the shape: The chalk line along the spine is so that I never dig into the spine which would affect the neck depth. The neck carve is my favourite part but is often too quickly done and gone! And then the preparatory work on the finishing of the body. I use a rough version of the Tru-oil slurry and buff method early on to act as a: - grain fill / gap fill / sanding sealer - 'reveal coat' to show up any glue residue, sanding marks etc. To do this, I sand with some brutal 120 grit emery (with the grain always) used wet where the wet is lashings of Tru-oil. You end up with a slurry of wood dust that is then wiped off and allowed to dry. Even at this early stage, it's showing some promise
    3 points
  17. The well-known quotation of Albert Einstein, "Everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler" applies here even though this was a quotation-friendly reduction of how Einstein originally said it: "It can scarcely be denied that the supreme goal of all theory is to make the irreducible basic elements as simple and as few as possible without having to surrender the adequate representation of a single datum of experience" "less is more" - I would contend that the stated "more" is not intended as being comparative to "less", simply that "less" is superior to the unstated "more". I agree about the snappy memorableness, even though it sort of undermines the meaning to a degree. Less is objectively not better than more in all cases. Fewer votes are certainly not going to win one a fair election for example. "Simpler is better" carries the same base meaning, however this does not necessarily mean "stupider is better". This just will not hold water, no sir.
    3 points
  18. Inlays cleaned up, fretboard sanded, frets installed & beveled (but not dressed).
    3 points
  19. I finally installed the battery box but I didn't put it there, I think it's just the wrong place, so I had a look to see where other people put them and I found a PRS with a piezo and did the same. Then I realised the battery connector doesn't fit so I had to use the wires supplied. I also moved the outlet jack because it seems silly to have them at two different places, and its hard to put a strap on with a lead plugged in
    3 points
  20. And... The Hollowbody: Same carve as the FiftyNine, on top of more evenly flamed hard maple. Trans-Black finish on the top, natural on the back. Hollowed Mahogany back and honduras mahogany neck. Faux binding on the top (exposed maple), a single sound hole and cocobolo binding on the B. rosewood fretboard. Fret markers are black MOP/abalone “V” blocks. Humbuckers, ABR-1 bridge and aluminium tailpiece. Schaller tuners and a cocobolo faceplate.
    3 points
  21. Grainger Guitars in the UK make excellent ferrule blocks.
    2 points
  22. Not an enjoyable experience. I made a little dowel to fill in the mounting hole I drilled to locate the bridge. Then I drilled the outer holes all the way through from the top so the brad point was just poking out the back, then measured 4 even marks out between and drilled in from the back slightly larger to take the ferrules, then drilled the inner 4 from top down until I reached the holes from the back. They're not perfect but they're pretty close. I'm sure it will be more noticeable when the ferrules are in. Anyway, on to sanding and finishing
    2 points
  23. And so to the headstock plate. Before gluing, a vital thing not to be missed - cutting the access to the trussrod: The cunning plan is to use the cut out above as the cover, fitted flush with magnets: There will be a shallow scoop at the apex as a finger-nail access (this will be a snug fit!) And no, you can't have too many clamps! The plate is presently oversize at the edges and will be sanded flush with the headstock once the glue has fully cured.
    2 points
  24. A bit of an update on neck profiling. I have defined thicknesses that I want to be hitting for both the 1th and the 12st (firfth and twelvst) frets, so in the absence of having a neck profiling jig or time to do this with a CNC I went back to the good ol' hand shaping methods. The first objective was to reduce the thickness of the neck from the line around from the 1th fret towards the 2rd (secird) fret. The profile from 1th increases towards the volute (voluteth) and the same happens from 12st to the heel (heelst). Using the flat face on the back of my trusty cabinet maker's rasp, I created a flat channel slightly wider than the blade until I reached a couple of mm larger than the target. This allows for the increase from 1th towards the 2rd fret position to be sanded in later. The channel at 12st is flat towards the 13rd (thirteenird) fret position. After these were dialled in, I faceted each channel similar to how @asgeirogm worked his Explorer neck. Once in a rough shape, the profile is rounded to remove sharp edges from the facets. The back of the neck is about a mm and a half from the target size, which is about as close as I want to do with my rasp. The teeth cut deeply to the point of it needing maybe a mm of sanding/scraping to remove. It's still pretty close. Once these two profiles are roughed in, I used a spokeshave in full passes to "join the dots". I tie a sock around the volute to prevent the spokeshave knocking up the profile in that location as it exits each cut. After doing this, I took my card scraper and refined the shape where I felt high spots. This can be done by scribbling around the neck with a pencil and lightly block sanding to reveal high spots using a ~10cm piece of plywood. The neck is still in what I would call a U-to-D profile. Still fat feeling with heavier shoulders. Once the rest of the profile and transitioning is completed, this will progressively be scraped/sanded into a D profile and then refined out to a smoother-feeling C by easing the shoulders. This part of the work is all feel, and I will likely take a hair more off the treble side in the "D to C" stage whilst leaving the bass side erring more towards a D profile. Not so much that it is heavily asymmetrical, but smoother feeling with how the hand sites. The headstock has a tiny low spot (marked) where the flat plane meets the transition. I think this came off the spindle sander. The back of the headstock will just be block sanded to take off a fraction of a mm to account for this. The location of the volute and locking nut bolting holes feels weirdly-long, which is consistent with examples of 80s ESP in this configuration. I think that they quickly moved towards the screw-down versions between '87-'88, and I can understand why. It allows for movement of the volute to a more aesthetically-pleasing and practical location under the rod access point. I still have some fine-tuning to do, moving this shape closer to the holes.... ....plus it looks like I could bring the headstock profile itself back a little....in a future build of course....
    2 points
  25. I only have a Panasonic Lumix about 12 years old and only found that feature after I'd had it for a few years. You know what they say, RTFM! I use it for every photo, especially in the workshop where I have 'warm white' bulbs in Anglepoise-type lamps, fluorescents overhead and daylight coming through the window. You don't need a white wall, you get the camera set up on the subject, then set the colour correction by putting a sheet of white paper in front of the lens. I also use Photoshop elements to correct framing, brightness and contrast. That's all I did to convert the first photo into the second one.
    2 points
  26. I think we might need to consult with @Dave Higham how we managed to get to this point. I'm certainly beyond that by now....all I remember was a beautiful Spruce top with multi-ply black-white-tort binding, then waking up here?
    2 points
  27. A monopod might be the solution. Your feet will make that as a tripod and it should stabilize the snap as we're not talking about super long times. 1/30 second is pretty long and should be enough under a good room light but it's almost impossible to do free hand. Longer times aren't needed. I haven't done much photography but these are the basics I learned when I bought a decent full manual camera and thought I'd become an envied shooter (which I didn't): For a good picture you'll need enough light on the film For enough light you can either widen the aperture or lenghten the exposure time If you widen the aperture you'll also shorten the depth of the sharp area which requires on the spot focusing but when you manage to do that right the results are stunning There's several types of films, some are more sensitive to light than others. A more sensitive film requires less light with the cost of the images being more grainy. Same goes for digital cameras, you can add sensitivity but there'll be "noise" which makes the images blurry. Of course you can try to find a balance Summarized, it's all about balancing the triangle of exposure time, aperture size and light.
    2 points
  28. It's usually the case, yes. My small hand files that I use constantly are just (IIRC) a hair over 3,3mm or the saw kerf of a 300-350mm table saw blade. I should probably pick up a couple of files and make one of these whilst I still can. Thanks for reminding me!
    2 points
  29. Yeah, it was just a smidge awkward when it was the reduced size. Looks great now, just how I hoped it would. Crazy how such a little change had made such a difference. Managed to sneak in a little time to do some jointing on the qld maple top. Almost there but not quite. I've never used a shooting board before, so having to go slow to make sure it doesn't get away from me.
    2 points
  30. you could make a little piece of wood kind of shaped like a football and do what ibanez does on the saber series. also carl thompson kind of does something like that on his basses as the cavity is so shallow. then the 5 way sits "on top" of the pickguard. might even become a feature - not a bug.
    2 points
  31. I learnt this during my structured systems analysis and design methodology units at uni and used the acronym ADDIM to remind me of the stages in a systems life cycle. The same thing can be applied to many structured development areas. Analysis-Development-Design-Implementation-Maintenance. Without going in-depth, it should be apparent how this can become a cyclical process. Iteration implies an endpoint condition is satisfied whereupon the clockspring unwinds. A lifecycle approach is continuous unless the project is discontinued. The objective is assumed to never have a perfect state of existence, and is continually developing in line with demands or against identified shortcomings. This literally shaped and refined my approach to design. It's not the only way, but certainly useful as a structured approach to quantify problems.
    2 points
  32. Ah. There are lots of creative processes, but to use design again two things are very typical. Iteration, and what I like to think of as respiration. By respiration, I mean a long process of iteration where it is an additive phase, and then a subtractive phase. Many times over and over as you refine to get to the cleanest and strongest versions that communicate your original idea. We usually begin with a long process of discovery (distillation) to find that singular idea(s), that then use that as a North star in the whole process. It really helps to have many minds on the same problem, as each will bring new things to the table which will often trigger new ideas and help to eliminate lesser ideas. Most anything you see, packaging, billboards, tv commercials, everything has probably been through this process or very similar. It's usually the bad ones that you can tell hasn't been.
    2 points
  33. Thanks. Are you in the amateur luthier group? I think ive seen you comment on there before but wasnt sure it was the same person? A D Finlayson is on there too. Interesting. I did wonder if there was a way to reinvigorate files. My workshop is fairly damp and next to the sea so rust is a constant issue. I've seriously considered having baths of oil to keep tools in. I don't know if any old acid would do but i have a bottle of hydrochloric somewhere. I would have thought acid would cause rust though?
    2 points
  34. In design, we strive for that absolute minimum to get the strongest idea across. Doesn’t matter if we are doing a photo shoot, making a logo, or laying out a design. You want to have it so that if you take only one element away, it fails. The utmost clarity. I always think of The Beatles and their strength in songwriting economy. It looks SO simple, but it’s the most complex in it’s simplicity.
    2 points
  35. I've often considered "less is more" to be a paraphrase of "less is often more- beautiful, lovely, useful, practical, etc." fill in your own blank. SR
    2 points
  36. Not quite in the same vein, but there's a French expression, 'Le trop (ou le mieux), est l'énémie du bien'. It's attributed to Voltaire and translates into English as 'Perfect is the enemy of good'. In other words, when something you've made is pretty damn good, don't go and ruin it by trying to make it perfect! Something of which I have to confess I have been guilty in the past. Shakespeare said, Were it not sinful then, striving to mend, To mar the subject that before was well? Confucius said, "Better a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without." Watson-Watt, who developed early warning radar in Britain to counter the rapid growth of the Luftwaffe, propounded a "cult of the imperfect", which he stated as "Give them the third best to go on with; the second best comes too late, the best never comes." Just thought you'd like to know. (Thank you Wikipedia)
    2 points
  37. Oh...... I get it now. I didn't make that Chinese dragon. I bought it from an eBay seller super cheap. Now, had I the raw materials, I prolly could make it, but I can't claim credit for this one. In other news, I habitually have difficulty with the wiring, but I can't stop myself from making it harder than necessary. Everything is all wired up and ready to go (hopefully). I used a 5-way switch and an auto-tap schematic from Seymour Duncan. The Hamer pickups I'm using were previously set up as a plain HB, so it wasn't difficult to figure out what was the start/end of each coil. Also, these pups are HOT. The neck is just under 20K, and the bridge is just over 20K. As singles, they're still clocking around 10. Being that hot, they're prolly ceramic. As ceramics are pretty bright and they're tapped, I used 250K pots to peel a little back off the top end.
    2 points
  38. I had similar fun with wiring a Tele for four-way switching. Thankfully I got it first time, however I feel that I learnt nothing from it. You just can't win!
    2 points
  39. So, back with some progress pics. Found my pattern router bit and routed the headstock with my 3d printed template Finishing up and a moment of lost concentration caused a bump into the headstock and template Used the offcut Made a small sanding jig thing for sanding the joint square Glued Turns out the repair failed as during glueing/clamping, the piece moved away from the front face of the headstock. I should have just cut it off and glued a new piece in, but instead of sanded the front face flush with the glued piece, which was a mistake, like I've covered earlier in the thread. Decided to glue a thin plate on top of the headstock to get the nut to the correct place again While planing the plate, a screw came loose from the depth thing and it fell into the bit. On the plus side, the screw/bit didn't go flying into my stomach, but on the not-so-plus side, the cutter took a beating. It can still be used for planing, but I have since used my 16mm pattern bit for all my planing needs. Two plates planed to a few millimeters over. I created two as I was thinking about putting a plate on the back as well, but ended up bailing on that Planed the front of the headstock and standed to prepare for gluing the plate on Rough cut and glued Routed flush So many pics, time for a new post
    2 points
  40. Many of us have various pieces of guitar building wood - tops, fretboards, necks and bodies - stored on some shelf. It has happened that when you finally want to build something out of them especially the thin ones may have warped, potentially beyond being usable. Here's a simple solution. A bunch of slats and some masking tape will keep air flowing around the pieces. If needed, a level board with some weight on it will further ensure the stability.
    2 points
  41. Thanks! I've never taken a picture of a guitar that conveys well what it really looks like. They are way easier to build than they are to take good pictures of.....although @killemall8's pics kind of make that a false statement as his pics (and bulds) are amazing! With mine, I think you need to be able to feel it while looking at the pictures to get the real idea. I think I could make the gloss to matte transition work if I didn't always have a burst both under the gloss and in the gloss. The act of finishing the neck cuts into the burst and eliminates the blended part leaving a harder edge that draws attention to itself. I haven't weighed it yet but I'd estimate it to be about seven and a half pounds, maybe a couple ounces more. I was really pleased with its lightness, and then I strapped on all the hardware and controls. I think it gained a pound and a half. SR
    2 points
  42. Here's as far it's going to go in my hands, friend wants to mess around with the wiring options so he'll do those. I'll do the control cavity cover once I get the plastic in the mail.
    2 points
  43. Hi all, Been really trying to learn this new tool in Rhino7 called sub-d. I took my LP model that I did in Rhino6 nurbs mesh and converted it to a Quadmesh, then Sub-D model. With a few pushes and pulls here and there, I have refined that even more than what Nurbs can do. I am really pleased with the results of this new tool. My next step on this journey is to do all of this in Sub_D only. Another learning curve with everything else going on as well in my life. LOL MK
    2 points
  44. 2 points
  45. The FiftyNine: Has a bit more dramatic carve on the top of nicely flamed hard maple. Light Sunburst. Solid, light Mahogany back and a mahogany neck. It has a faux binding on the top (exposed maple edge) and flamed maple binding on the cocobolo fretboard. Fret markers are MOP trapezoids. Humbuckers, ABR-1 bridge and aluminium tailpiece. Vintage Kluson tuners and a cocobolo faceplate.
    2 points
  46. (Descriptions from the earlier posts) The FiftySeven: A gentle carve, more LP-ish, on a hard maple top finished as a Goldtop. Solid, light Mahogany back and a Spanish cedar neck. Cream plastic binding on the top and the cocobolo fretboard. Fret markers are simple offset dots. Humbuckers, ABR-1 bridge and aluminium tailpiece. Vintage Kluson tuners and a simple black faceplate.
    2 points
  47. all buffed... note to self... need to change default video output settings since y'all don't allow mp4... also why don't y'all allow mp4??
    2 points
×
×
  • Create New...