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    ADFinlayson

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    Bizman62

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/19/2021 in all areas

  1. Final pictures - looks like its all set up and ready to go! Cheers and thanks for all help guys!
    6 points
  2. And then you get more clear on it and it goes transparent. SR
    5 points
  3. got some color on...
    5 points
  4. Well it's cut out and inlayed, the veneer I used was a real pain to get in, paper thin and just wanted to fold over. Came out ok though apart for a little bit of tearout in the upper left corner on the outside, I'm hoping that bringing the whole lot down a hair or two will sort that out before I thickness from the back. Will keep it as is until Ive got some 120 grit. It's all quite subtle but the bookmatching is definitely visible I was hoping to be getting back on with the other one but I made the mistake of ordering my binding from stewmac on Labour weekend (or whatever that is called) so it's only just been dispatched. Can't do anymore on this one until my bracing material arrives from Spain, so I guess it's time for instead
    4 points
  5. Some modest progress this evening. Glue up went well on the top so I got that sanded down a bit and cut out, still way over thickness but I'll worry about that later. It's occurred to me that the 80 grit roll of paper that the drum sander is currently armed with is really not ideal for acoustic building, the scratches it leaves require a lot of work to sand out, it's more like the equivalent of 40 grit hand sanding. So I've ordered a roll of 120 for final sanding. Gave the inside of the sides a good sand and made some side braces which are now in. They're 5mm wide by 3.5mm deep and I've rounded them off, I went for 4 on the lower bout then 2 on the arm bevel side thinking that lump of limba is adding a lot of stability so they're probably not necessary passed the waist. I also carved the underside of the arm bevel. Very awkward to get to especially when the grain is working against you. I used a 20mm chisel bevel side down to do as much as it would reach, then thumb plane and finished up with a concave min scraper. Then got to work on rosette making! Carrying with the theme of using up those offcuts. I cut the last figured piece of limba out, marked some angles and cut it out on the band saw, which left me with the worlds tallest rough sawn trapeze inlay. Knowing what I know about my hand planing skills, I opted to sand the saw marks out, I'll just end up putting a twist in it with a plane. Didn't bother sanding top or bottom as its only the sides that will be kept. Then I cut it into slices on the bandsaw with the fence and cross cut sled, neither of which are very good on this saw. I had a diagonal pencil line across the back so that I could pile them back up in the right order Then I laid them out, flipping every other one so that each piece is bookmatched with the previous one (smug), then numbered them. I decided at this point that it was just a bit on the small side, I must have got my angles just a bit too tight and reduced the diameter slightly, so I glued them all up with a slither of bog oak veneer in between which should increase overall diameter by a couple of mm, I'll no doubt have to add a veneer around the edge of it anyway if my hole isn't bang on. Used superglue and accelerator. The band saw blade left a bit of fuzz so I did give all the edges a quick sand with 240 as I went. And now it's ready to be cut out. I kept the pieces on the thick side because the end grain is quite delicate, hopefully it survives the rest of the process. If I do this again, I'll glue it up on a backer to help maintain structural integrity. I'll also make the wedge taller so I've got more material to play with - I want the rosette to be fairly thin anyway but I don't have a huge amount of figuring choice. And a glam shot.
    4 points
  6. Been forgetting to update this; the amp has changed a lot since I posted the video above. I decided to move this into "amp I'm actually gunna play live with" territory, and my buddies and I mostly play covers from the 60s/70s/80s/90s, stuff like Zeppelin, ZZ Top, Bon Jovi, AC/DC, etc. so that's what the changes are aimed at. OD channel is warmer and more "classic" sounding, lower gain, with an effects loop as well. I also added a clean channel based on the Deluxe Reverb, but with independent pre-phase-inverter gain and master, along with a framus-style mid control and a tilt-shift EQ knob that covers bass and treble. The pre-amp circuit is currently structured somewhat like this: I'll sound demo all the changes once the whole thing is finished, in the meantime I've been building a simple pine headshell for it to live in. Very simple/crude dowel joinery. Just kinda hacking this thing together since it will all be covered and I don't really care what it looks like underneath. Going to do tolex, leather corners, cane grill, etc.
    4 points
  7. And now on to shooting clear. It is still more blackish than these look....but I'm thinking it doesn't go as far as a blackburst. SR
    4 points
  8. No problems about hijacking. Communication is what forums are all about. Wait and see . . . won't be long.
    3 points
  9. I test fitted the pots and switch and found that the top at 6.3mm was too thick. So I routed the control area to 4mm thick from the back. The drop-top was glued onto the body and trimmed flush but I seem to have forgotten to take any photos. This happens from time to time. I just get involved with what I’m doing and forget about the photos. Anyway, it's beginning to look like a guitar. I wanted to leave the top its natural colour so I decided to bind the front rather than leave ‘nekkid’ and I thought I ought to do that before finishing the back. Trouble is, I didn’t want to use plastic binding and bending the E.I.Rosewood I have is a bit of a problem. I have a home-made 'Fox'-type bender but the Tele shape doesn't really lend itself to that, and I don't have a bending iron. I have a piece of steel tube about 3" diameter with a halogen bulb inside it, but that's no good for the tight curves on a Tele. So, lacking a suitable bending iron, I decided to try a different method. I’ve bent smaller bits of binding, for head plates by dropping the piece of binding in boiling water for a few minutes and then sandwiching it between two forms and drying it out quickly in a low oven. Like this The binding kept its shape perfectly and finished up like this. I had to make two jigs, one for the treble side and one for the bass. This is the one for the treble side in its open position. Here it’s closed. The centre section gets pressed down first, then the ‘horn and the lower bout. The centre and lower bout are common to both jigs. This photo was taken before I re-worked the inside form to allow for the thickness of the binding. I painted the binding with ‘Supersoft 2’ and wrapped it in cling-film overnight. The next day I found a piece of copper pipe with a cap on one end, slid the piece of binding into it and filled it with boiling water. I left it in there for about 15 minutes changing the water a couple of times. Then took it out, placed it on the former and clamped it to death. This was the bass side. Once clamped, I warmed the whole thing up with a heat gun and then sat it on a radiator and left it overnight (it wouldn’t fit in the oven). It seems to have worked. There was a fair bit of spring-back but it’s easily pushed into the right shape. I left them on the formers until I installed them. You may have noticed there’s a third piece of binding. I’ll explain what that’s for later.
    3 points
  10. Well I got the last lamination on the mold, I ended up flush trimming the last couple with the plunge router from above, this thing has acquired quite a bit of mass and harder to slide around so I was getting concerned about pushing against the little makita trimmer in my makeshift router table. I made the template for the centre press block thingy bigger. It's now 120mm wide giving me a bit more contact area at the waist. I made it out of lams of waste 9mm ply that I had, glueing and screwing then flush trimming one at a time. I used up the 9mm because holding this little block of wood up to the router table was fairly scary and I didn't want to try taking too much in a single pass with my fingers that close to the bit. Highly tedious though with 17 pieces! The centre strip that I inlayed is an ebony offcut from a fretboard, it will serve as an alignment rod to make sure it is screwed down square during the bending process. I was about to route the channel for it and realised there is a (albeit small) possibility that I might hit one of the many screws that are in that block, decided that I'd rather ruin a chisel than risk hitting one of those screws with a router bit. so I used a 6mm chisel to hog out most of it, then the mini router plane to tidy it up - I got that very recently, it works amazingly well if you need to make a truss rod channel a hair deeper. Fortunately no hand tools were harmed in the making of this channel. You can see in the close up pick below that it looks like the centre section doesn't fit properly, that's because the shape is 4mm larger than the inner mold to account for the width of the side, the two pieces of spring steel and the heat blanket, hopefully that's going to work out. Next thing will be the frame but I think I'm going to wait until the heat blanket and press screw have arrived so I can be sure on dimensions..
    3 points
  11. Speaking of jigs. I got fed up with Macgyvering sometihng on the workmate every time I wanted to join thin pieces so I've just made a plate joining jig similar to the LMI one, only a lot cheaper! I've found carve tops are fairly easy to clamp up due to thickness and lack of flex, acoustic backs and tops want to bend all over the place so need plenty of support and a flat surface to do the glue up on. I used a load of the cherry wood framing stock my neighbour gave me in the spring, Once I'd planed off the lip, it was about 50mm x 20mm by varying lengths. There are two vertical braces 80mm apart so I can see the centre seam on both sides of the glue joint then 3 horizontal braces that the rope is tied round. Not sure what the exact name for the join type is but it's essentially the same as an X brace for a soundboard and there are 6 of them so it took a little while by hand. I didn't follow any specific dimensions for this other than the largest and smallest tops from my stash and making it work with both. I tried it out with a 5mm ebony set, you may see the top isn't jointed, I was just testing it out but the bits that did make contact were clamped up nice and tight. I made the wedges out of the same stock, 50mm tapering town to zero. The double wedge at the bottom is way superior to just a single wedge so I think I'll cut a couple more. Got some braided rope which I tied and looped at one end and wrapped fairly tightly diagonally across and around each of the horizontal braces, then pushed the wedges in to pull it all together. The rope pulls the two pieces together and and the wedges tighten the rope and provide the downforce to keep the workpiece flat against the jig. Then on the back you can clearly see the joint too. Feeling a bit smug, I thought I'd try it out for real and see how thick a workpiece it could manage. so this is a 16mm maple top that I jointed and glued up. Another thing I noticed about this clamping method is there isn't really any slipping when tightening it up. Before the wedges go in, it's still just about loose enough to manipulate the joint, but when the wedges are pressed in, it doesn't really cause it to slip about - I guess this is because down pressure is being applying equality with pulling the joint together. It's a cool way to clamp, no wonder it's been used for hundreds of years! One last thing that I found quite cool, and a happy accident. The X and Y braces that make up the frame are not glued they're just a friction fit and the orientation of the joinery means that the rope holds them together, yet if need be I could take it all apart and stash it. HOWEVER my workshop is normally a mess and I'll end up losing bits of it so I think I'll glue them up.
    3 points
  12. I've been working on polishing the front of the guitar body. Really happy with it, the blue really does look iridescent in real life. Just got a bit more polishing to do then I'll get to oiling the sides and back of the body.
    3 points
  13. Guitar is looking great. Something I've been doing lately with sanding the radius is to put the beam in the vise and take the neck to the beam instead, you can get right over it and get a proper lunge in so it goes a lot quicker, the heel and headstock make for good handles too!
    3 points
  14. Sorry for the lack of updates, the past few weeks have been busy! I used 90% of my spare time to work on the guitar and the rest of the spare time was spent planning my upcoming trip to Los Angeles (I'm leaving Saturday morning ) So I have the pleasure to announce that the guitar is finished! My dad was overjoyed and almost shed some tears when I gave it to him! The guitar sounds and plays great but there are two small issues that I'll fix after my trip. First, the bridge pickup is too far from the strings. I designed the guitar before receiving the bridge and I assumed that the surface-mounted pickups were the tallest things... Turns out the minimum height of the bridge is too high and I had to shim the neck to adjust the break angle, So I will make a plastic shim/riser for the bridge pickup. The other thing is that the tone circuit needs some adjustment because the difference between the different modes is very subtle.. I used the capacitor values from the schematic on the website I found (see older post) and since the build was a bit rushed to reach my deadline I didn't have time to play around with other values, Here are some shots of the final guitar:
    3 points
  15. I've never built one of these, so this suggestion may be crap.... but I'd be tempted to finesse the mating end of the neck blank to allow it to sit flush while keeping the centerlines in line. Once your fretboard is in place, it will be invisible. SR
    3 points
  16. this one I think is good to go... but I can't tell if the burst is done yet... still drying so... will see tonight in this pic the headstock doesn't even look like it has burst... not quite happy w that yet... but so hard to transition in such a small area... and make it match the rest... does match the logo well tho.
    3 points
  17. And so I'll be moving into a 'planning before doing' phase over the next couple of weeks - not least because there are some grandparenting duties looming which means 'moving all your mess out of the way' But there's a lot to get right and it is worth the pondering without the temptation of cutting or gluing something before I'm sure! This is where I'm at with the wings: The ebony is around 6mm thick and will have a subtle top carve, following the same sort of curve as the back, a couple of diamond 'f' holes and some weight relief scoops in the underneath. And some very careful routing for the switches. Switches? Yes - we're going Jaguar guitar switch system, back mounted. "And so I'll be moving into a 'planning before doing' phase over the next couple of weeks"
    3 points
  18. Thanks, mahogany braces it is. You were totally right about back thickness, once it was down to 2mm I could really feel it start to flex and wobble. Glued it up and went down just under 2mm, My caliper was measure between 1.7-1.85mm (I think the drum sander needs some tuning up). Got it glued up over lunch and made some serious progress this evening. Cut out and shaped my back braces on the dish - 15x6mm. I couldn't find anything suitable with the grain going in the other direction so I just used the offcut from when I cut the back out and it was just long enough with a few mm to spare, actually I think it looks pretty cool! Dug the gobar deck out of the shed. Decided to stop before the last brace, it was starting to look like spaghetti and I only had 3 gobars left and I don't want to rush the clamping Also finished shaping the headstock, the veneer on the back came out pretty well though there is a bit of a split at the bottom I think I'm going to have to dust and glue if I don't carve through it.
    3 points
  19. well... took the tape off... hope to finish the other one with one last coat tonight and take the tape off that as wel... maybe dye this weekend...
    3 points
  20. Got the neck finished today and finish sanded. After Sanding it was time for the first layer of oil. I am alway amazed how much the color pops with just some oil really happy with the neck and back also I also could use a cut-off from the fretboard as the cavity cover No on to let the finish build up and way for the last parts to arrive. Still missing the nut, Jackplate and Pickups.
    3 points
  21. Progress report...made a template for the pick guard. Found centerline using this laser level thing I received 17 years ago as a gift from mother-in-law to hang pictures or something. I've only ever used it for guitar making...and bonus I figured out the red googles it comes with is for seeing the beam better in bright rooms. I gotta start reading directions, I thought it was to proect my eyes from the blinding beam or something so of course I never used them routed the neck pocket... ...and got a nice tight pocket. Starting to look like something resembling a guitar!
    3 points
  22. Hey there, wanted to share a piece I finished last week with you. 7 String Multi-Scale Neck-Through Explorer. 25.5 to 26.5 Scale. EMG 808x Pickups and Hipshot Hardware. Started the neckblank (wenge maple with black red black veneer inbetween ) early last year: but was way to afraid to start carving a way so i let it sit for a really long time. for the Wings I added simple Ash after I routed a slot for cables. Fretboard is a offcut of wenge. Got It all nice and Routed and a new sander also I went for black crimson stain and red grain enhancing filler , the red grain filler only really shines in bright light. But got it all nice and done ( apart from a striped pickup screw i have to replace to get the neck pickup lower )
    3 points
  23. Now it’s ready for the rest of the binding. The treble side is straightforward, but the bass side binding has to be pushed down in the bevel area, so reducing it in height to about 2 mm in that area helps it to bend. The rebate is cut so that, when the binding is installed, it will be a little proud of the top surface and the sides. It’s easier to scrape the binding flush with the top and sides than the top and sides flush with the binding. I now have to shave the corner off to form the bevel. This left a couple of triangular grooves which I filled with two strips softwood. I’ve only done one bevel like this before, on an OM, and I didn’t trust myself to cut it with a spokeshave and keep a constant 45° angle all the way round. So I took most of it off with the spokeshave and then finished off with this sanding contraption. After sanding, the bevel looks like this. You can see the upper softwood filler. The lower one has almost gone.
    2 points
  24. I can now install the purfling, but I can’t install the binding at the same time. I do it a little at a time, holding it in place and applying a drop of water-thin CA and trying not to glue my fingers to it. Should have taken photos but . . . The third piece of binding goes on first. It covers the length of the bevel. It’s not as deep as the rest of the binding, it’s the same depth as the purfling. I take most of the surplus height off with a little block plane and finish off flush with the top with a cabinet scraper. Now I run the router round this area again, as if I were routing for the binding, which tapers off the ends of the bevel top binding. Just as the binding rebate had to be widened on the top, in the area of the bevel, it also has to be deepened in the side by an equivalent amount. I haven’t been able to think of a way of doing that with a router, so I have to resort to craft knives, chisels and patience.
    2 points
  25. Had a wood delivery the other day, including my spruce bracing stock, African ebony fretboards, head plates and bridge blanks, also a couple of more tops, a german spruce and a sitka spruce. None of the above is particularly expensive wood. e.g the tops were around £15 each, bridge blanks £2 a go, head plates £2.80 and fret boards £8.50. But all good quality for the price, no defects, I've used a few of their fretboards now and can't fault them so highly recommend Maderas Barber for acoustic stuff, their electric tops and body blanks are a bit of a rip off IMO. The brace wood was nice and dry so after the better part of a week I started cutting some of it up to make my braces for the limba build. When I cut the lap joint for the x brace this time, I followed the Driftwood guitars method - marked them out against the template aligned them together in the vice and cut them both at the same time. The resulted joint was much better than the last - fitted together perfectly with no play and lined up with the template perfectly, Also cut up one of the face plates to make the bridge reinforcement. Cut to 2.5mm then radiused on the deck. Got that glued in at the same time as the x brace. My stewmac order hasn't arrived yet so I'm still waiting on the extra ebony binding which is holding up the walnut build.
    2 points
  26. 2 points
  27. Hope you don't mind me dragging this subject up again. I just thought you might like to know that the French have a wonderful, even romantic, name for it. 'Le ciel de l'ébéniste' or 'The cabinet maker's sky'. Apparently they often wedged the bars between the workpiece and the ceiling. Another thing about go-bars. You'd think that the more they are bent, the more pressure they apply. But apparently they don't. Some years ago Hesh Breakstone on the OLF forum experimented by installing a go-bar on a kitchen scale and compressing by different amounts and however much the bar was bent, the pressure stayed the same. I suppose a structural engineer would tell you why.
    2 points
  28. Thank you for your kind words! I have to confess to you and Bizman at first I was making a bit of a joke. The back will be stunning when lacquered but being inside you will never see it LOL. But taking it seriously I think lacquering outside and inside would hamper resonance so using oil is a great idea, cheers! I do think I will have the same problem with cracking in the finish. Both semi's I've built have lots of cracks and the first one has a Qld Maple top While I'm working on it I get really carried away making corners round and so forth and I keep thinking "why not go all the way and make it fully accoustic?" But I'm sticking to the plan for the time being, its a hybrid. I'm experimenting with construction and learning from the previous build (the ES) For example instead of having a block inside like most semi-accoustics, the top is its own block and also the way I've sunk it into the sides it is its own kerfings. I saw a video recently where I think someone else has the same idea - huh! I've got an LR Baggs T-Bridge on its way for this one so I'm hoping to get some truly accoustic sounds as well as fully adjustable intonation
    2 points
  29. Looks like either the springs are too loose or weak, or the six screws on top are too tight. If you can't push it down with your hand it's the latter. Measure... To avoid redrilling the holes you need to know the diameter and length of the string capstans so they'll fit into the original capstan bushings - or you'll also need to know the outer diameter and length of the bushings so they'll fit the existing holes. And then you need to know the size of the tuner housing so they'll match the spacing. Your photos don't show how the tuners are attached but I assume there's a screw or two. You may be able to find a matching set but if the only issue is misplaced screw holes, filling them and drilling new ones is no big issue. Gotoh, Kluson and Wilkinson among others make decent priced good quality sets, I'd say for non-locking tuners the price range for a decent quality set is about $30-40, premium quality being double or triple of that and most likely overkill for that guitar. The type of tuners you need is 6L meaning 6 in line on the left side looking from the top.
    2 points
  30. How do I say this gently? Pretend I'm whispering maybe... I would never use Tru-Oil sandwiched in there the way you did. There's no reason to have it there, its not buying you anything and can 'retard' the dye from 'popping' like it could under straight lacquer. And can cause adhesion problems if not properly scratch-sanded or if not allowed to 100% cure before lacquer. If I were to ever do that, I'd be waiting two weeks dead-minimum between oil and lacquer application to allow the oil to 100% cure first. And I do mean 100%. Make that 110% fully cured with no possibility of it not being fully cured before lacquer (if it were mine). It's just not worth it, there's absolutely zero to be gained by using it in this type of application and several risks that aren't necessary. One of which is your dye doing weird shit on you because its reacting to an oil and not a lacquer, and there is usually a difference in reactions. PS, There's no yellowing due to 3-4 coats of lacquer, that the naked eye could ever see.
    2 points
  31. Had a good day, finally a Saturday when nobody called for doors. Started on the back and I'm happy it went smoothly with almost no mistakes Err...actually.... First of alL I drew a plan which I now think is very over-kill but I didn't know that until I'd done it Some of the templates for the top were helpful although I erased the lines I drew a couple of times I thought the top area didn't look right so I dug up the photos for the ES I built a couple of years ago Erased and amended and amended again By the way talking about no mistakes. See the little dot in the middle of the upper bout? Yeah drilled a hole thinking it was a top which would get routered out for the neck Turned out nice, except for that dot but not to worry it will get filled with sawdust
    2 points
  32. Based on my limited experience of acoustic building and what I've seen of your builds, an acoustic is totally not out of your depth. But if it is, there is always @Andyjr1515 to step in and point you in the right direction like he has for me Besides, these two might still implode yet, they're far from finished
    2 points
  33. that's a great observation. I'm afraid the quality of workmanship has distracted me from ever seeing it... but yeah... scottr rocks!!
    2 points
  34. What a beautiful blues loving lizard, this is a good omen for your guitar
    2 points
  35. Yes and its very comforting to know LOL. Having this knowledge keeps me from going berserk and smashing things to pieces! Now that I'm content with the top of the top, I turned my focus on the underside of the top, luckily my Landlord has a drill press! As soon as I got it set up I realised a flat surface is no good to work on so I made a convex base for the top to rest on out of a block of 90x35 pine I drilled the centre of the squares. The drill press couldn't reach everywhere... So it was out with the 90x35 pine again. I also went nuts with the drill press in-between the squares, it just seemed logical that the more is done with the drill press the better I tried various chisels but it was hard work So it was out with the router again. I was very cautious doing this but got a good result. And notice the wrong date? It was actually 5th of September (dah) Next I paid my father a visit and it was back in the shed again. he has this carving blade from when he was building Rocking Horses and it did quite a nice job Notice the dots in the holes? That's to keep track of how deep I'm going. I started using a felt pen but realised the ink sinks below the surface so I did the rest with HB pencil And all done for the day. It was 7.15pm and I'm so glad the neighbours aren't really close I want to do more, get closer to the edge and a bit thinner maybe. I'm not planning on this to be an accoustic but at this stage I'm tempted (ha ha) I've made the strip in the middle 100mm wide this time, on the ES it isn't wide enough and the top tends to collapse. So anyway that's the story so far
    2 points
  36. Have been getting a little progress...I hate it when I think I've got a couple of days free and someone rings up and wants some pictures hung. Yeah I can do that but, ah, its like getting a Dentist to come round to brush your teeth LOL First here the photos I posted in General Chat I made a boo boo and forgot to raise the router on the third run. I've got over it now but its so annoying because its the sort of thing I constantly do and never learn Using the square cut router bit makes it look more "professional" Then its on with the sander, but this is where the square router is less desirable. The square corners never seem to disappear and I oversanded leaving dips and flat spots... ...and on top of that there were still some felt pen marks The oversanding left it a bit out of shape but wait there's more... I adjusted the Pickup area And went round the edge again I actually got around to buying a scraper and dealt with all the dips and bumps Torch testing the results...
    2 points
  37. Hello my name is Ash and I'm addicted to making guitars.
    2 points
  38. Thanks Andy, I was chuffed with my output for a weekend, I didn't even get out there until gone midday on sat and I made a chilli and watched 2 Disney films with my 3 year old today. I think some of this stuff could go quicker though. I'm pretty much sold on making a side bending machine and I could do with making one of those LMI style plate joining jigs so I don't have to MacGyver something on the workmate or the floor every time I do a glue up. This was this evenings glue up of the top. And here's the arm bevel out of the clamps. Came out pretty good, just that spot right by the heel block it isn't perfect, but no worse than some of my kerfing. Speaking of which, that's something I could do with getting better at. I always manage to break it right at the waist and that's the one spot that it can be seen from the sound hole. Need to have a scrape around under the bevel to clean up and see if I can reduce some mass before I glue the vertical braces in.
    2 points
  39. I'm away from my desktop photos at the moment so I can't show you what I mean, but one thing you can do at the heel is carve a relief between the bolt insert area and the edges....it's only the edges that actually need to seal against the guitar body. Makes for a lot less sanding and flossing.
    2 points
  40. This is definitely working for me. @Drak - a Gotoh tremolo would be perfect for this, especially since the price is pretty damn good. A lot of people say they're better than FRs as well....any input on that?
    2 points
  41. Yep, you're right, these slots were done without this novel idea of beveling the knife-marks. That idea shall take it's root in another build at another time - but I am very happy with how these slots turned out. After beveling the slots themselves, and to clear up any confusion, I'm talking about beveling with a small triangle file *after* cutting the slots to proper depth after radius with a good saw, I installed one single fret. One. Then the neighbour reminded me of the time. Quite kindly, I must add! And, to be fair, it was just after sundown and they have a small child, so I said fair enough and packed down the tools for the day. One fret! I wouldn't want to be a fret in the block right now... They must be terrified right now! Haha.
    2 points
  42. Sure, such is the weirdness of Internet phrasing, right? I've always written with the tone that is half conversation and half exposition, even what it's chatting with people I know about things....that we both know we know. Writing in this voice helps the alien archeologist lizards pick apart and digest this weird corner of the Interwebs so they don't need to rouse my brain from the jar. That and other people outside of the real timeness (real timyness?) of this thread can pan through it without zombie-threading it in ten years with "Kirk who?".
    2 points
  43. Thanks Mike, the beauty of still photos is it looks a lot easier than it is, had there have been video, it would be rather sweary. Thank you, I have a few jigs for this - I bought the radius dish and the OM mould, made the gobars and deck, but no special skills. I have been winging it for a few years and after enough builds some of it just becomes muscle memory, This build however is a step or 10 into the unknown and fully back to winging it.
    2 points
  44. Despite the issues, I have started building necks again after 5 months. The new fret leveling guy is awesome! Also got this amazing abalone block inlay board from doug.
    2 points
  45. I find it odd to have relief on the neck after pushing the frets in. Logically thinking it should be the other way around: As the frets should sit tight in the slots there's a tiny bit more material in the slots than there originally was which should make the fretboard bend backwards. A stiff enough neck should be able to withstand the bow and tighten the frets into the slots instead of giving in. The harder the fretboard material is the more backbow there theoretically will be. Anyhow, a relief can easily be fixed by tightening the truss rod, both dual action and single action rods are built to straighten the relief. Sometimes the neck doesn't seem to straighten no matter which way you turn the truss rod nut. If there's glue in the truss rod channel or something else hindering it to work properly, tapping (rather banging with your palm) the neck can help releasing any snags.
    2 points
  46. It has no effect on nitro. It is often used to wet sand instead of water. SR
    2 points
  47. It was such a nice day Scott. and I hope that you can get a picture of a blues anole, it is really great to have wildlife living around you, good for the soul, and good for your lizards that you play the music that they like! Yes I like playing guitar down in the woodshop, the other day I was playing some Acca Dacca and L.A. Guns songs in there. Those clamps have been on for 24 hours. I have just taken them off. That fretboard needs some wood rasped off the treble side and then it gets radiused.
    2 points
  48. And here. A And then re-coated with CA and carefully leveled again. I It is ready to shoot a couple layers of clear and then tint.....and more clear etc. next weekend. The truly said part is after a couple weeks of humidity so thick one is in danger of drowning just walking around in the back yard, we just had three days of 90+ degree temps with 40ish percent humidity. Perfect for spraying. Next weekend I'll probably need a life jacket again. SR
    2 points
  49. Spot on. My phrase that "the design of a guitar or bass is a series of compromises held together by hope" is far, far too glib. The fully comprehensive definition is: "the design of a guitar or bass is a few immoveable geometrical principles incorporated in a series of compromises and held together with hope."
    2 points
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