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    Drak

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/15/2021 in all areas

  1. And while that glue is drying we prep the top for glue up. I hope to get two tops, a headstock plate and a control cavity cover out of this. And while that glue is drying, I finished my body shape and cut it out. SR
    5 points
  2. Aramat 6sB Finally done! Fully handmade guitar Aramat 6sB from Fruni Guitars. A lot of sweat and tears in this build but outcome is amazing. It took me something around 350-400 hours. Enjoy! Body: American Swamp AshNeck: Canadian MapleFingerboard: RosewoodElectronics: EMG 81/85Bridge: HipshotTuners: Gotoh SMTFrets: 24 - 2.8mm Jumbo extra hard (nickel-silver)Scale: Baritone 26.5"Nut: GraphTechInlays: AbaloneColor: Antique BlackFinish: Hardwax OilCostruction: Bolt-on (5 screws)Weight: 3,05kg
    5 points
  3. A while back I was carrying on a conversation in here and noted that my later build threads didn't have as many explanations as earlier builds did. I felt like I've been repeating myself over the years and started letting the pictures tell more of the story. And I got taken to task for that lazy attitude. Apparently many folks reading my posts haven't been around for all of them. And they'd like a chance to learn what I've learned. So This time I'll try to explain more about what is going on in my messy little workspace. What is one of the most important lessons learned in here?
    4 points
  4. Done some staining with Angelus dyes. First stained it Rose, then sanded back with a mirka pad. If I'd have left it like this my daughter would have been very happy. Then mixed light blue with netrual (diluted) 1 part blue to 2 parts neutral, and added a tiny dash of yellow and went over the top. Not the scratch below the blade switch, annoyed I didn't see that earlier, it's causing me no end of problems. Also note that weird light spot near the seam. Dunno what that is, thought at first it might be glue squeeze out that I didn't get, but there are several other smaller areas that w
    4 points
  5. I made a hologram. You can't see it in the pictures, but the ridges look 3/8" tall under 1/8" of glass and they move as you move. That was fun, but back to practical stuff. I sliced off a piece of ebony and flattened it, and cut fret slots in it. Interestingly it has the same deep navy, deep green deep brown and black that the test on scrap has. That was not a conscious decision, but maybe my subconscious took control. SR
    4 points
  6. Black metallic for the sides and back of neck! Love the contrast!! front and back yet to be decided!!
    4 points
  7. I continue the sequence for a few more rounds and then quit adding dye when I sanded back with 2400,3200, and 3600. At that point I just finished polishing it right up to 12000. And then I wiped on medium CA with a gloved finger several layers thick and leveled that finishing with 300 grit. And then shot a few coats of thinned lacquer and then some black tint coats. This scrap isn't photographing very true to its color. When does it ever? SR
    4 points
  8. The bridge is obviously not the bridge going on it, just something gold I had within easy reach. Edges blacked out, along with a very slight top and bottom edge-burst. Very slight, couldn't have made them any thinner. You can see through the control cavity opening the hollowness of it. There's a neckblock, tailblock, and a bridgeblock, just big enough to hold a TOM and tailpiece. Besides that, it's hollow except for the centerbeam connecting them which you can see through the bridge pickup cavity.
    4 points
  9. I completed this guitar late last fall. I've been building on and off for 10 years when I get the time. I built two almost identical at the same time but with different stains. One I sold to a client and one I kept for my office as a "test drive" so prospective clients can get a feel for what I build before commiting to a custom. Build thread is Here. Specifications: Name: Claymore Body: Honduran mahogany (maple veneer) with grain matched cavity covers. Water based lacquer finish. Neck: Paduak (maple veneers) with flame Maple binding and luminlay side dots. Tru oil fi
    4 points
  10. The final pictures!
    4 points
  11. Hello again! This one, I've been planning to build for nearly ten years. I was always a fan of the Warwick Infinity NT bass, and in a previous life I started building one back in the UK. I think I even started a build thread, back in the day, but I dare not go find it! I moved over to Australia before it was even close to finished, and left the project behind. After I got back into the luthiery saddle last year, I figured I'd grab some timber and give it another go. @Prostheta, it's happening... 34" scale length, 5 strings, 24 frets. Queensland maple and maple neck
    3 points
  12. Yes, Strat players are probably well aware of the natural harping that occurs on the open G string if their guitar doesn't have a string tree fitted on the D/G pair. The distance behind the nut to the tuning peg is pretty close to the 5th harmonic on that one string, which then rings like crazy on open staccato runs. I've seen some players exploit it going back the other way though, plucking the string behind the nut to excite the 5th harmonic back onto the open string and then bend the string behind the nut to get some interesting pedal steel-esque slide runs. Metal musicians are often a
    3 points
  13. OK kiddos, both the Dead Machine and Angkor Wat are hardwared, wired, working, glossed, and finished. Except I'm waiting on an order of strings so I can mount and adjust the necks and do the setup and birth these things for real. So, here's the Dead Machine, done, waiting on strings. Here are the specs: Core Wood: 1-Piece Mahogany Top Wood: 1/2" Bookmatched Spruce Accent Wood: Pickup cover, rear Control cover, Headstock veneer, Truss Rod cover. Figured Koa Hardware: Sperzel brushed gold locking tuners, Gotoh fine-tuning tailpiece, Harmonica bridge, gold dome
    3 points
  14. Admittingly never having an original idea, I came across this guitar which looks stunning. Having never thrown away any of my offcut scraps of wood, I decided to embark upon this project. Right now, I've started cutting my scrap pieces with a miter saw. The inspiration: My materials: Starting to put the puzzle together on top of my Strat template: Need to keep cutting down more pieces and arranging them to optimize contrast of colors and sizes. More to come...
    3 points
  15. See through metallic blue ! And a little teaser.
    3 points
  16. Thanks for partaking in the madness, @Andyjr1515 To me it makes the most logical sense that these two resulted in the most obvious differences, as you seem to have experienced as well. They're effectively changing the properties of the strings themselves - tension, downward pressure on the saddles, 'speaking' length of the strings etc. The change in tone due to the other variables tested thus far seem to be a lot more subtle, if even detectable at all. I haven't forgotten about these tests, I've just been snowed under with work and haven't had the time to devote to further experim
    3 points
  17. Carvin’ time. Profile roughed in. Profile and volute/headstock pretty close. Volute medal inlay and tuner holes finished. Carved a little wire spooling and outlet area for the neck pickup. Made a truss rod cover from left over fretboard rosewood. Side dots. Neck glued and roughly shaped in. Current state of things. My goal is to be spraying finish this week, so I’ve got a lot of work to do!
    3 points
  18. I sharpened up the ol' iron and set to planing the glue surfaces for the body. In the meantime I shot more layers of clear nitro on the test scrap. When turned in the light this thing moves like nobody's business. And it has three distinct colors: deep navy, deep dark green and a burnt copper. I glued a piece of polycarbonate to the base of an old low quality plane. Then I used some spray glue to attach sandpaper to the face. And then I wired about 2 lbs. of old fishing weights to the top. You just push it along and it sands things flat. SR
    3 points
  19. Built myself a spray booth in the garage this week and thought I'd share what I've done and learnt so far! When my dad and I replaced the garage door with the stud wall several weeks ago, I got myself an explosion proof axial fan and we built it into the wall. I was planning on a negative pressure booth - Means the pressure in the booth is lower than the surrounding room, so it's sucking air out of the booth at a higher rate than air can enter the booth which has it's pros and cons: Pros of a neg pressure booth being that it's safer IMO , because it won't push fumes out into the room
    3 points
  20. This wasn't meant to turn into a hotly contested argument, and I'm sorry if it's ended up that way. FWIW I'm not saying that an extra half-second of sustain translates into anything meaningful, or even does the opposite and translates into something huge in real life. I'm simply saying I don't know what will happen. At this point I'm more interested in what the unadulterated sound does when incremental changes are made to the rig. The way I'm using the test rig can't really help us predict what will happen when it's plugged in to an amp with a bunch of effects in front, and is well beyond the
    3 points
  21. worked my arse off last weekend to re-design my design... and worked very hard this weekend to try to get a completed body. cnc was running solid from 8:30am yesterday to 8pm, and 8am today till now (6pm). I wanted to do another test run b4 moving on to the wood kevin chose... and make any minor tweaks along the way... turning out pretty solid. so here's my process... cut the f holes and shape of the top, flip, cut f hole/toggle/ctrl relief and some bending relief in the back. modified my process to switch to a ball nose bit for the bending relief as this should make i
    3 points
  22. I think it was @Gogzs who suggested this one: string-through body or top loading. A new plank of tas oak was cut to the same dimensions as before (840mm x 65mm x 25mm) and a headstock of sorts added to one end. Instead of the headless hardware I've thrown on a single tuner from an old Strat copy and a Wilkinson WOF01 convertible bridge at the other end. This type of bridge can be fitted as a top-loader or for string-thru body threading. The old single coil pickup was installed as per usual into a matching rebate cut into the plank and then low-E, D and high-E strings fitted and swapped b
    3 points
  23. And.... on this set neck guitar the neck is set! Big moment for the build. These hollow bodies feel light! I love it!
    3 points
  24. Pickup routes... Had to elevate the router over the neck to do the neck pickup route, so a little half inch plywood and plenty of double sided tape and away we go. Couldn't help myself and threw in the pickups for a quick look. They're not at all in position, but you get the drift. It's all coming together! I've been researching whether to drill the holes for the bridge posts even or staggered. Due to the adjustability of this bridge I'm leaning toward even at the moment.
    3 points
  25. I glued some 80 grit to some 3/8" polycarbonate and gave her a more stable base. Then finished polishing her up and soaking her in Danish oil. Live oak koa anyone? SR
    3 points
  26. Erebus #7 Hello All, I build mostly for fun and for friends in my home shop. This one is my 7th effort, based on the 1957 Les Paul Jr. I did document this build and will be starting up a thread with all the gory details in the near future. Sorry for the less than professional pics. These were taken literally at the moment of birth on my work bench Cheers! Specs: - Korina neck and one-piece body - Birdseye maple fret board - 2-way truss rod - Gabon ebony headstock veneer, neck heel, and a "screwless" control cavity cover - Bone nut - Kent Armstro
    3 points
  27. Man enters bar with three mates and holds up his hand. "Three pints, please and another one" "Ah" says the landlord, "Another guitar builder?"
    2 points
  28. This is true. I have never used a router to pattern cut a neck or fretboard. I cut it to shape after the fretboard is glued on and get it to final size and shape by hand. My neck profiles actually begin in the edges of the fretboard anyway, so there is not too much difference in time. Though not to the degree of @Andyjr1515 I have cut back on the amount of work my router gets. Pretty much only cavities. I used to use either the top or the body as a pattern for routing the shape of the other piece, but tired of chipouts in figured wood. Now it is carve and then belt and spindle sand to final
    2 points
  29. A few steps forward and we’re nearly there. The binding changed colour and the pickguard shrank a little. I’m toying between the knobs shown here and doing some home made ebony ones with bone dots…
    2 points
  30. This video might be of use to you. Looks like the BBS20 is one of those three-wheel variants, which are notorious for being able to set up to work reliably. They're also harder on blades as the small wheels and multiple turns the blade has to make as it goes around cause the blade to flex more than on a large two-wheel bandsaw, which can lead to premature stretching and breaking of the blade. Wobbling blade and unable to make straight cuts suggests your primary problem is insufficient blade tension. It also doesn't look like the cutting capacity is very tall, so you might struggle to
    2 points
  31. What? Doesn't everybody plan their finish before starting their build? I surely do. Now truth be told, I still need to finalize the body shape...... And thanks! SR
    2 points
  32. I was in a local music store in the late 80's when the first wave of Quilted finishes were really hitting the market. By that time I already had several Gibsons, a '73 LPC, a 347, and a '57 ES225TDC. So I asked the guy behind the counter how they 'got' that kind of finish and he said he didn't have a clue. To try looking it up on a forum or maybe on a builder's site. I remember he said that guys who 'do that' were on 'forums' and liked to 'talk about it' (we're talking probably the late 80's, haha) That's what started it, seeing the first Quilted Maple finishes hit the
    2 points
  33. I decided to read through the whole thread. Unless I missed it (did I?), I didn't see any mention of pickups or electronics. Yet, I see what looks pretty clearly like a battery housing in the back. I started out building active systems, all my first builds all have front-end passive pickups from my favorite winders with back-end EMG active electronics. So just curious about that end of things. Also, I've sprayed many Tele bridges in the past, usually black, but I've sprayed all kinds of hardware all kinds of colors over the years. So on some of my builds where you
    2 points
  34. I revised the drawings again - this time I used autocad. Took me a while to learn, but I seem to have got the hang of it to make at least a basic 2D drawing. I made a couple of different designs, with minor differences. A key point was to figure out if I should I was also deciding whether the guitar I the wings should be lighter with dark thin stripes in the neck through, or vice versa. My initial preference was the former, but once I saw pieces of walnut that were available I decided to go with walnut wings with thin maple stripes. I will post the pictures of the woods I selected separa
    2 points
  35. So, I just went down a plane rabbit hole recently. Mostly because I was buying old ones and refinishing them which I found enjoyable, and also to 'try out" a few to see if I like a 3, 4, 5 or 5 1/2. For guitars, I got a couple Stanley adjustable-mouth, low-angle blocks that are SO handy and great with figured woods. All of them are 1890 - 1950 and are noticeably better than any newer stuff. One thing to note, the low-angle block plane uses the iron with the the bevel UP and has a 37 degree cutting angle which is a mix of the iron angle and the bevel - if you grind the bevel at 25 degree
    2 points
  36. Me too, in a big way. Most people are very risk averse, I'm just exactly the opposite. I'll try anything with the complete understanding up front that it can all go down in flames at any minute and I could care less. It's not the work that counts for me, it's what's in my head, because I can repeat anything if it comes down to it. And I've found so many wonderful side roads to strange places that others would never discover that way. Kind of the 'give a man a fish vs teach a man to fish' kind of thing. The guitar is just a fish, and I know how to catch fish, lots
    2 points
  37. OK - great set of experiments. And some expected results and some surprising ones to me. I listened to the clips through decent quality ear buds and away from external noise. Consistency Check I could hear no difference at all. Credit to the quality and design of the rig @curtisa. I still think that plucking mechanism is more than a touch of genius Floating vs Fixed Hmmm....well, I thought I could discern an attack difference between these. The first one sounded more strident in each case...but then when you sneakily mixed then around I'm pretty sure it was all in my imagi
    2 points
  38. You guys are better men than me. While I like the final results of sanding it feels a lot like grunt work. 50% of my time goes into getting the project 95% of the way complete, and the other 50% goes into sanding and finishing! When that first coat of finish goes on I'll be glad for all the sanding I've done. Until then, it's just a bit of a slog...
    2 points
  39. I may be alone in this, but for me, sanding is kind of magical. The wood comes to life right under your fingertips. SR
    2 points
  40. I think, really, it is only by the sheer accumulation of mistakes over time that brings the true expertise and skill to a thing. Ask any really good craftsman how many mistakes they've made in the past and they will usually fall down laughing, because the count is so high.
    2 points
  41. well, take a step back... hold up your thumb... eye it up and dive back in there. that binding looks real nice against the nat top.
    2 points
  42. That's exactly how I already do it. You just can't see the holes at either end. You don't need to make any jigs to do it, waste of time. That's exactly how you line up the square perpendicular to the holes in the first place. By dropping the dremel bit into each hole (already drilled first) and adjusting the square incrementally until its matched. Then draw a line next to the square as a guide, then clamp it or tape it in place. As I said...already foolproof.
    2 points
  43. Electronics/battery cavity is done and 1/3 of the olive boards on the backside is now clamped up and I'm waiting for the glue to dry. One of the more tricky build steps is now also completed. Last time I spend 5+ hours on this, I learned my lesson so I made a proper jig for drilling, With rough hand sanding, it took me roughly 50 minutes this time, but insanely happy with the result. Only thing I'm now missing is the blade switch slot, and I have no damn idea how to get that clean and straight. Will try to figure out tomorrow on some test pieces. Got some ideas but not sure what will
    2 points
  44. OK, well seeing as we're all rejuvinating... To get back to the thread reviver's point, there's nothing stopping you using neutral cure silicone to avoid the corrosion issue, although I've personally never heard of a truss rod failing due to rust that couldn't be traced back to severe moisture issues across the whole instrument, in which case a bit of corrosion on the rod is probably the least of your worries. There's also no reason to explicitly use silicone products either. Acrylic caulk used in kitchens and bathrooms would also be perfectly acceptable and is non-corrosive. It would als
    2 points
  45. I don't like silicone for this reason. Years down the line it will discolor your wood. Silicone has oil in it and eventually it will creep to the surface. Years ago they made these little balls to space a cabinet door panel in the mortise edges. A few years later you could see where each ball was in the face frame of the door. They also made a silicone mat for wood working that had little nubs all over it to act as a stable surface for hand routing. Well I used one so as not to have a body slide around while hand routing ( Pre CNC days). When I applied a finish the spots showed up e
    2 points
  46. Sapele and Tru-Oil are a natural combination. I also brazed the brass light extension bars with cross-members, and will add a final centre vertical piece to link the cross-members. Sockets are loose, so a little wonky. There's still a few details to finish at the top, specifically an electrical cover and cable inlet hence why this part is still pretty rough. It doesn't need to be pretty, just functional. The central part of the box was made from the sapwood side of the Sapele boards since it'll never be seen. Unfortunately, sapwood is also pretty fracture-prone and I usually
    2 points
  47. Hi folks! Here some updates for the 6string bass. Frets, nut, head plate paint and varnish missing. Think that this week is fineshed this steps.
    2 points
  48. Now there's a task, Drak....asking Scott if he plans anything! It's pretty much well-known that he and I are polar opposites in that department, Scott would get us to Mars within the week using whatever he could pour out of the garage. I would develop a working drawing and meticulous risk assessment after a good six months of farting around.
    2 points
  49. I was going to post a reply but the news wasn't very upbeat. Since we live in this new strange world where everyone gets a new car and deserves a gold star, I just usually don't reply anymore. What I 'was' going to say, in my experience, is that once a burst is blown, there's very little chance of saving it, usually. I have had to face my own music many times over that, I'm used to it now, it doesn't phase me anymore. But some people really get bogged down and stuck over trying to save a shat cake, they just can't let it go and move on forward. But you found your way f
    2 points
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