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    Bizman62

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    MiKro

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    curtisa

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    mistermikev

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/14/2020 in all areas

  1. Look at this way. At least you didn't attempt to mill a bunch of fret slots, break every single one on first attempt, write a strongly-worded letter to your local newspaper about the lack of quality manufacturing in your area, appear in an interview on 60 Minutes about 'the nightmare neighbours from hell', and have to explain to the police why you're running around the streets wearing nothing more than a hot water bottle and brandishing a pool cue while yelling 'HERETIC! HERETIC!'. By my reckoning I'd say catastrophe has been averted
    4 points
  2. Regarding the old unfinished projects, during the summer also managed to finally complete my own pedalboard/case. Pretty minimal rig, just a mild homemade fuzz, tube driven OD, octaver that I use sparingly, just to underline a few notes here and there and a flanger to add some modulation, also used lightly... still need to add some Velcro and connectors.
    3 points
  3. Greetings from Opatija, Croatia. I decided to quit my job and change companies in hope I find people with better work ethics. Few months ago I couldn't imagine quitting cause I love the folks I work with, but since we work remote, they behave so irresponsible and slack most of the day and then work long hours... I couldn't deal with being most of the day at home behind my laptop anymore. Now I'm using all the vacation days I have left since summer. Decided to drive out to the coast and see if summer is still lingering around. No tourist, no people on the beaches, bars closed etc... 19 deg
    3 points
  4. Okay, I have a lot of the hard work done. I sanded the body with 80 grit, 120 then 220 & 320. Sanded the neck and laid in dot fret markers of red oak , radioused the fretboard & put in the frets & I used toothpicks for the side dots. For my very first neck build I am very proud of what I have accomplished. Routed and carved the neck pocket for a perfect tight fit.
    3 points
  5. Today I painted the fret board straight edge to take glare out of the stainless steel. For my untrained eyes it puts a contrast on it between the fret board and the straight edge that makes it easier to see the back lit white paper behind it. First grey primer. Painted with a flat black I tired it and it works well for me. Ron
    3 points
  6. Here are some paintings I have done.Here are some paintings I have done.
    3 points
  7. Another new build, just completed... Custom KR3 6-string, based on a similar 8-string version I did a couple of years back, with Buckeye Burl on Ash body, Wenge/Maple 3-piece neck, Zebrano multiscale fretboard (26.5-25.5"), Hipshot Grip-lock tuners, Single String Guitar Bridges, EMG 81-7/707 pickups and matte PU finish
    3 points
  8. The link I mentioned *is* the Bridge Doctor, As far as I'm aware JLD are the only makers of it (although it's not a particularly complex device. I'm sure it could be DIY'ed by just about anyone). FWIW, I'm not suggesting that steaming/heating isn't performed by some in order to flatten a warped top, but it appears to be less common than resetting the neck. For whatever reason the more common approach appears to be to steam the neck off, re-shape the heel attachment faces and re-attach the neck. That may be for the reasons that I listed, could be others, I don't know. Anothe
    2 points
  9. Well it's either that or go outside and deal with....people.
    2 points
  10. Well, after waiting for the parts for a quite a few months, they showed up in a span of a few days, and I was finally able to finish the assembly and give it to my friend. His son has celebrated his 1st birthday a few days ago My friend seems to like the bass a lot, still looking for the perfect setup We actually have started a new project, I've been building him a 8-string Iceman with a reverse head for a while now, some pics to follow soon. Never enough time... Anyway, a few pics of the finished bass:
    2 points
  11. I'm going to err towards the other side and say approach his method with caution. He mentions that the reason that his method of performing a neck reset works is that the area where the fretboard overhangs the body near the soundhole has sunken causing the neck to tilt forward and raising the string action, and that his method restores the original shape of this area of the soundboard thus tilting the neck back the way it originally was. In all the acoustic guitars I've seen that could have done with a neck reset the problem was not that the neck had collapsed forward near the soundhole,
    2 points
  12. Thanks mate. I'm just a hobbyist. This is my second build, there are a number of little things which I wish were better but I learn something with each build I do. The 12 string build is my third but that's stalled a bit because I've also started making a Violin as well. I've also just received the plans I ordered to make a Maloof Style Rocking Chair so instruments may take a back seat early next year when that becomes the priority.
    2 points
  13. Not sure if this is what you mean, but I used this on the 8-string to figure out tensions of each string based on scale length and pitch: https://tension.stringjoy.com/
    2 points
  14. Found exactly that and it made the most sense, yeah. Some did suggest epoxy, and yeah, most answers were gluing bamboo to concrete I'll go with wood glue and yolo it. The only change since my initial plan is that the core will be purpleheart, sandwiched between two dark bamboo boards. So when I contour it the purpleheart will be sticking out on places. Neck will be laminated bamboo with sheets of purpleheart veneer inbetween, going for the "racing stripes along the whole body" look again. @mistermikev and @curtisa that story sounds a bit fishy, but I'll believe you
    2 points
  15. So I am an artist, not by trade. But I have been drawing since I was big enough to hold a crayon. I paint sometimes, draw and wood burn(pyrogrophy) Here is some pictures I have made for friends and family.
    2 points
  16. Pretty impressive! I especially like your pyrography, the fifty-odd shades of char...
    2 points
  17. well, learning cam and my head is tired but I hit a sort of milestone this morning on this bass... in terms of getting the initial carve where I want it... still have a long way to go... so many things to learn: how to tilt my control pockets and neck pocket what is my plan for how to mount this after one side is carved? thinking either A) build a form that it can lock into, B ) the edges will still be on the flat plan... at least in two spots so I could just make something to hold the 'other' spot. C) maybe will have enough material outside my body shape and just need to figure ou
    2 points
  18. yeah... even I don't wanna see that... nor my wifey!
    2 points
  19. I went through an issue many years ago from an auto accident that was "covered" by Insurance. Now the accident was not my fault. Another ass hat ran a stoplight and plowed into me. Many back operations and 2 neck operations and 5 years of hell. When it was all over it the cost was over $385k of which was at least half being lost income. They did no pay. I understand risk very well. I still choose the options I have. My son lives in Canada, and has socialized medicine. When his daughter was deemed severely autistic as well as mentally almost no IQ, He still had to wait a year and countle
    2 points
  20. I'd start with a flat semi-solid block and some wet sandpaper, starting at 600 or so and going through the grits up to 2000 or higher. Sand in one direction only (back and forth allowed) and change the direction by 45 deg every time you go to a finer grit. That way you'll see when all the scratches from the previous sanding have disappeared. Apply just the weight of the block and level the ridges. Only when the surface is level to the desired degree it is time to buff. When using power tools there's always the risk of burning your finish. Don't apply too much pressure, use a fine enough compou
    2 points
  21. Dunno. Would the epoxy/carbon mix gain any more strength if the material being impregnated into the channel was something else just as pliable? Cotton rope? Nylon? Horse hair? I'm not suggesting the process doesn't add stiffness to a neck, but I'm doubtful that two epoxied-in carbon fibre strand/channels would be more effective than epoxying in a couple of 6mm premade carbon fibre bars either side of the trussrod. The example that Bruce demonstrates in the linked thread only has the fibre laid about two thirds the length of the neck, directly underneath the trussrod. Is it stiffer th
    1 point
  22. In my experience I have found that it is the soundboard at the bridge, bulging up, is what causes most of the problem. Shaving the bridge weakens it causing it to bulge more. I have repaired 2 guitars recently by using the Stew-Mac method of removing the bridge and heating the sound board and bridge plate with a heated aluminium caul and clamping everything down to take the bulge out and letting the guitar stand for a few weeks. Cleaning up the bridge and soundboard then reattaching the bridge. I made my own cauls from aluminium for a few dollars and they work great. The one gui
    1 point
  23. Hey folks, I'm looking around for wood for my second build, and bumped into bamboo. First I was looking at it for the fretboard, and I'm pretty sure it would be suitable for that. Started searching around and found some archived threads showing that there are companies building sticks completely from bamboo. The material in question is: https://www.designholz.com/product/Solid-Wood/Bamboo/Bamboo-black-board-Schokoboo-Schokowood-121x40cm-17mm.html https://www.designholz.com/product/Solid-Wood/Bamboo/Bamboo-board-caramel-121x20cm-19mm.html I'd laminate stripes of the light a
    1 point
  24. Will definitely share my rocking chair build if people are interested. The plans I'm using are these ones - https://www.leevalley.com/en-gb/shop/tools/plans/73902-nancys-rocker-and-footstool-plan?item=01L5131 as they are the easiest to get in Australia. I hadn't considered a veneer on the headstock but I did keep the offcuts from the body so I could thin the headstock a bit more and then put one on. I might cut a veneer and then mock it up to see what it would look like. Yeh I'm not a particularly good guitar player haha so I wouldn't use a tremolo. So given that, it didn't seem a
    1 point
  25. I always fret after I've glued the fretboard to the neck but before gluing the neck to the body. If you can put some weight on the board and it flattens without cracking, I'd do that and let it sit for a few days, then go ahead and use it. As you say, it is trying to bend like that anyway when you attach it first but cannot due the the strength of the neck. SR
    1 point
  26. This is also my youth. One of the greatest things about growing up in this time is you got to see the peak of the analog days and the complete transition into the digital world. I've still got one foot firmly planted onto each side - a power user of both. @Prostheta I'm similar in manipulating the system to my benefit, but rather than the machines, I gravitated to poker where you can use that skill against humans. Same concept though - watch them build up their chips and then through some secret maneuvers, get them to spill their chips out for you to take. I get great sadistic enjoyment o
    1 point
  27. No you don't: https://www.madinter.com/en/stewmac-japanese-fret-slot-cleaning-saw.html
    1 point
  28. right on, well don't be a stranger! would love to see whatever you are working on these days!
    1 point
  29. I'm no trained woodworker either. I'm just trying to combine everything I've heard or read to guitar making. Having a good memory and vivid imagination helps. And logical thinking.
    1 point
  30. Clever! The reasoning sounds solid and the 30 seconds steaming most likely doesn't do any harm to the structural integrity. A longer steaming might loosen a brace but even that would be easily addressed with a couple of clamps. As the method is non-destructive it's perfect as the first attempt. If the problem reappears too soon, a neck reset can then be done. Knowing that the problem usually appears after decades it's safe to call it an aging issue. Thus it would normally take the same time to straighten it by applying force counteracting string pressure. It's a well known fact and p
    1 point
  31. I know I got something out of order here but you get the gist. .
    1 point
  32. Yep. TRy using the MDI tab and yo can command it to move Z up exactly where you want. then if need be yo can then move it back to the lower spec if needed.
    1 point
  33. Mike, in mach on your screen you will see cycle start, Feed hold, stop, and Reset. Stop is similar to EStop. it stops except it stops the motion without shutting things down It if used by itself will lose steps. RESET is ESTOP. Feed hold will run a snort distance as it already has lines in the buffer, then it stops motion with out losing steps. at that time then you can press stop if needed to fix a problem. When you run a tool path it finishes up and parks at X0, Y0, Z + whatever above that is set. It then stops the program and the machine, all while keeping the steppers in a hold m
    1 point
  34. Proper old school cabinets! The yearly fair in my hometown used to have several arcades carrying older games around a few yrs previous, so at the back end of the 80s you could play Galaxian instead of newer things like Outrun. Good Times man.
    1 point
  35. As far as the estop button, you twist it to unlock i and make it ready. Once like that all you have to do is press it and everything stops. In order start again you will need to untwist it it again. As far as x and y moving yes and no. If you save the session when you leave mAch it should still be like it was. But the steppers are no longer under power so they may have moved some..MK
    1 point
  36. I can subscribe the first two, but experience? Not that much, I'm afraid.
    1 point
  37. nice, clean looking body and cavities. good luck finishing it. Looks like the hard work has been done!
    1 point
  38. It does make sense. The question is, does it really matter. The standard rule is that the tighter the radius the finer the tuning accuracy can be. For what I've learned 14:1 is a bit on the cheap side, 18:1 being of good quality and 21:1 ultra fine. 12:1 to 39:1 is from cheap to ridiculous. For a dropped D tuning you'd have to turn the peg 39 times! And the same when tuning back to E. Accurate? Sure. Worth the time and effort during a gig or rehearsal? Not necessarily. Also, tuning is not just about turning the pegs. As the tension changes some stretching is often required as well to make the
    1 point
  39. You'd still get two bolts on the centreline - one in front of the neck pocket and one underneath the tail. You could probably sneak two either side of the waist as well that would sit on a straight line perpendicular to the centre. That'd get your bolt locations on a mirror-able cruciform shape. Your starting point can be wherever you like, as long as the cutter will move within the intended confines of your blank, hit everything it should and miss everything it shouldn't. If you've nominated the centre of the model to be the centre of the block of wood (say +Y takes you towards
    1 point
  40. Probably this. Treat it a bit like you're making an Airfix kit plane component that is still attached to the sprues. You're creating the body out of a solid slab of timber, so whatever is left behind after doing the full perimeter of the body will still be the full thickness of the thickest part of the body contours and flat. I'd leave the body attached to the outer block using 6-10 tabs and drive some bolts through the blank (outside of the milling area and away from any potential collissions from the cutter) into your spoil board. Mill everything from one side and do the perimeter to half th
    1 point
  41. While he might be able to tune his guitar, he might struggle to tuna fish.
    1 point
  42. Bummer, man. I fear that some dumb knucklehead will put us into a situation that we can't extricate ourselves from, but otherwise we're zero accident drivers with deep cuts on our fully comp premiums. If anything happens, you know it'll be their fault. Assholes.
    1 point
  43. If I was an American I'd loudly ask for bleach to wash my brain.
    1 point
  44. I'm a newbie when it comes to working on guitars. At 13 yrs old, my step-dad gave me an ovation applause 12 string in 79 to play in his band. Thats been the only guitar i played until my 50's (started playing it again at 50, now 52), but that project will be another thread. I inherited this G-10 from my great aunt and the golpeador on it (white) was peeling off (see the outline). When I removed it (no heating, just a razor), it dug into the finish as shown. One of the tuner pegs was also bent and the neck had both dirt and wear on it. I wound up sanding it down while I evaluated the finishing
    1 point
  45. The difference between having an insurance and paying taxes is that the latter is based on your income so you only pay what you can afford. Insurance companies may start with a good looking bargain but then raise the costs by 10-20% every year. I just cancelled my business health insurance because of that. The cost would have been much smaller if I had a clean health history which I don't have. I used to suffer from asthma as a kid, I'm allergic to animal dust and I've had two seizures at 30 years intervals so there's no diagnosable disease behind that. Yet another company refused to sell
    1 point
  46. Made a bucket load of chips this weekend, but the look didn't change dramatically. She's getting her hair done....and it going to Take For Ever. I treated her to a lot more Mike Zito whilst she waits..... SR
    1 point
  47. Other than waiting on the new preamp tubes this is done. Looks great for circa ( 1989 ) and it sounds awesome again mk
    1 point
  48. I don't think there is any rod type on the market that I haven't used and would not hesitate to use again, other than Stewmacs Hot Rods (too deep) or a low quality rod that will not outlive the instrument it's fitted in. As long as the rod fulfils its intended function, then it is good. Everything else is personal preference. My only hesitation is with the rods pre-wrapped with PVC as Ripthorn and Mender mentioned. If I can't see the quality (or lack thereof) in the welding and construction then I can't feel confident about the quality of the rod on the whole. The design and function of
    1 point
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