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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/18/2021 in all areas

  1. Hello all!!! Back from the dead!!! It has been six and a half years since I have done any work on this guitar, and about 11 years since I started it. At this pace I plan to be done by the time I am 70. Anyways, I finally have some better woodworking skills and enough money to buy necessities. Plus, I am not a total moron anymore, just a partial one. I decided to sort of reset this project because there were a lot of issues: 1. The fretboard was way too thin -- I was warned by many on here about that one 2. The frets were not seated in all the way 3. I hate hardtail styl
    4 points
  2. Finished up this Traditional explorer. This is what i dub my best overall build to date. Specs: Body: 2 piece black limba top: Figured claro walnut (resawed myself) Neck: 13 piece Bolivian rosewood, paduak, purpleheart and maple veneer Fretboard: Ziricote, 25.5" scale, 24 fret, XJ jescar stainless, Blue luminlay side dots Custom wound pickups with matching black limba covers (made the covers and sent them to the pickup maker) 1 volume, 1 tone, push pull split
    3 points
  3. It's finally over. We can go back to acting like adults now. I think everyone knows what I'm talking about.
    3 points
  4. And on to positioning of the tuners. Other than the added dimension of the two strings being able to move independently, I do it similar to with a fixed bridge - I fit the headstock equipment (in this case the clamp) and then fit some 'sacrificial' strings to the top and bottom positions to line up with the scale length + intonation and with the fretboard/string spacing: Having positioned the two outer ones, I marked the front screw positions and then the two for the middle strings: Then fixing the tuner bases by these front screws, I could string up to get the splay angle, ta
    3 points
  5. I don't know if I mentioned it but I am also building a LesPaul flat top inspired guitar for myself this one is a bolt on neck.I the moment I have maple veneer glue drying. But here is a look at it before I glued the veneer. The inlay are sticker but on the carve top I want to try doing wooden inlays.
    2 points
  6. The ABM dimensional drawing tells you more: https://abm-guitarpartsshop.com/media/products/7010c_Dimensions_7010.pdf There's 1.95mm from the bottom to the opening where the string exits towards the nut. You need some downward force on the nut for each string to seat properly in their respective slots, so the string clamps need to be at least this distance (plus a bit more) below the bottom of the nut slot. Say you're using frets with a 1mm high crown, and your nut slot is cut about the same above the surface of the fretboard, sinking the string lock 1mm deep into the fretboard w
    2 points
  7. And here are a few bonus pics
    2 points
  8. Hi guys, does anyone know hot to do this out-standing look guitar. the first one seems to be a combination of dying and natural, but the second one is like the spalted maple were inlayed into the flame maple. Any ideas?? Scorpionscar
    2 points
  9. So here is what I got done today. First I cut the purpleheart into fitting pieces. The big chunk I had was cut in exactly half, one half will be used for these two builds. The second half will be used sometimes in the future. After cutting it in half, I had to resaw it, but since I don't have a band saw, I ran it lengthwise through the table saw and finished the rest with the hand saw. Here's the result: I also plained them flat with my router, so they are ready for what's coming to them, and this is it: These will be the wings for the black/purple/gold one I designed in pa
    2 points
  10. So yeah, this thread has been going slow. I finally finished setting up my work area, I now had some additional shelves and roughly 7 more square meters usable on the attic, so some things should be much easier to do than last time. And I'll be tripping over my own feet way less now. I also glued some test pieces together to see how bamboo glues on bamboo and how it glues to the purpleheart veneers. And it went awesome. All the test pieces I had glued couldn't be broken where it was glued. So there we have it, bamboo, even tho it's grass, can be glued like wood. This is dark bamboo gl
    2 points
  11. Kyocera 0.6mm 2-flute endmills from your old mate, Drillman/Carbide Plus on eBay. 400mm/min feed rate with 200mm/min plunge, spindle at 24k RPM, 0.3mm max depth of cut to a final depth of 2.5mm. Takes about 45-50min to do a whole board. Haven't broken one yet. Could probably go harder but I'm not having a race.
    1 point
  12. so realistic... just like a woman to cut you and laugh while you're bleeding!! looks great tho!
    1 point
  13. drawer slides - best if you can snag one's that have the 'auto close' springs. they pull the slides closed with a little bit of pressure and that acts to keep the router from wanting to 'stay' up... but isn't required... little piece around the bit there is called an 'escutchion' and is from the plumbing section. it is 'ok' as because of it's size it ends up 'averaging' out your curves... you could build a piece by shaping an old cutting board. springs in between the two pieces act to pull up on the router to help it navigate your carved top. I just used screws to hold the o
    1 point
  14. Was vacuuming out my table saw. Almost wanted to take a big bite of that.
    1 point
  15. looks lovely! very clean look. nice work!!
    1 point
  16. Based on an image search in Google it looks like the abm 7010c sits level to the neck, i.e. the thickness of the fretboard lower. The distance from the nut seems to be in the ballpark of 12 mm or half an inch. On a 'standard' guitar the neck break angle is usually about 10-13 degrees, yet on Fender type flat headstocks the string angle can be about 6-7 degrees. Less than that may cause the strings to fall off, yet I guess with the headpiece being so close to the nut there's not much space for the strings to fall off the grooves.
    1 point
  17. Do you mean you want to resaw the recon slab into thinner veneers (ie take your 1/8" slab and split it into 2 slabs, say 1mm thick), or cut it into smaller chunks of the same thickness (eg to make up inlay pieces)? Or you just want to make it flatter/thinner? Isn't recon stone just crushed up stone set into some kind of resin? Cutting stone implies you'll need some kind of diamond blade to stand any chance of getting through it, even if it's interspersed with epoxy resin. The silica content is likely to be quite high, which will happily eat conventional toothed cutting tools for brea
    1 point
  18. That is actually something i plan to do a video on. Not nearly as difficult as it sounds
    1 point
  19. To follow on from 'The Yeti' Series, I have begun work on the second line : 'Hephaestus' (Greek Blacksmith God/God of Fire) I will begin with 1 Telecaster and 1 Jazzmaster in this mode. Obviously, it looks better than this in my head, but as a general idea: I'm still exploring which pickups to use. In my playing I am almost always on the humbucker (I play with a moderate amount of distortion - the lighter end of 'Heavy Rock'), so part of me wants to put in two humbuckers. The other part of me says "you have a strat and a gretsch for that, give y
    1 point
  20. I think it's a tinted epoxy pour. The epoxy just sits in the hollows and valleys of a timber slab that has been chosen for the rough edges and knots. The one on the right looks like two slabs on top of each other - a rough cut burl top is laminated to a fiddleback maple top and epoxy is poured into 'pools' created between the two layers. Google 'live edge epoxy slab' for some ideas. Edit: @mistermikev was faster than me.
    1 point
  21. I endorse this idea, and yes you do have it in you!
    1 point
  22. This is an interesting thread as it really highlights some of the more critical aspects of guitar making. Some are preferences, some or just good wisdom, and some are results of the tools used. In my process, the fret board slots are cut first because I'm using a table saw sled with a Stewmac blade and pin template. It's true that I do go back and deepen the outsides of the slots to match the radius, but it's really a minor process and I know the slots are all parallel and accurate. In the end, it's could very well be slower than doing them by hand.
    1 point
  23. I like two and four.....big surprise, I'm sure. SR
    1 point
  24. When I have a bunch of options, I usually pick the two I like best......and only play one of those. SR
    1 point
  25. 1 point
  26. Those color combos are starting to come together really nice. That burst elevates it to another level. Awesome!
    1 point
  27. That looks interesting and the ergonomics are a fact. FWIW on some Crimson video Ben answered a question about a warped neck, telling that if the twist is that way it would improve playability. His biggest concern seemed to be that if the twist was caused by instability in the wood there'd be no telling how it might behave in the future. Doesn't that mean that a stable neck should stay stable even if carved to a twist? Speaking about uneven pressure and the power of string pull etc. just think about wooden propellers in aeroplanes. I suppose the Merlin engine of 1300 hp would stress
    1 point
  28. i somehow missed earlier post of bass with three fricking humbuckers? "I like the cut of your jig sir". that is going to have a LOT of options... v nice work.
    1 point
  29. so... was looking for fretboard maple... and I have some that will match this one... so revision 12321312355532.fgggabade.3329. would love your thoughts.
    1 point
  30. Yeah, I've always felt that way, too. When you've gone out of the way to make the components and materials high end, to go with the high end skills and craftsmanship being employed in the build, it makes little sense to cheap out on one part. Unless that one inexpensive part is exactly what you want and need. Then it's just a bargain. SR
    1 point
  31. well, again the only black one gotoh makes is a modern version... (with no side walls) and I'm not sure that would look great. I have found a wilkinson version in black... but we've already purchased a gold gotoh one so... and gold sd510 tuners. Perhaps I'll do black for my prototype... just to be a jackwagon.
    1 point
  32. You could always get a black one and fit brass saddles?
    1 point
  33. I refilled them and they look great! A little darker since my rosewood dust is dark, but I just need to recut them and we're in business. I'll have my dad do that since I don't want to waste a perfectly good fretboard that has just indicating slots, not actual cut to depth slots currently.
    1 point
  34. well, they do it's just the 'modern'. afa I could find they don't make a traditional tele bridge in black. his initial request was that it be a very 'twangy' guitar... and with that in mind - you gotta have the brass barrel saddles!
    1 point
  35. @ScottR thanks man I'm try to get better with each build. I did make $300 on a kit that I put together for a customer. A copy of a relic fender $4000 guitar.
    1 point
  36. Ok so I will measure and refill and adjust accordingly!
    1 point
  37. If some frets aren't in the right place then some frets will sound out of tune, if the slots are on the notches and they're perpendicular to your centre line, they will be spot on.
    1 point
  38. @ADFinlayson Thank you , yes it is an red oak for The neck and poplar for the bottom body and radio oak for the top then a quilted maple veneer glued to the top after I carved it.
    1 point
  39. yeah, wenge is not fun - I love it but dang it can hurt! So can oak!! when I was young I was sanding a big cabinet by hand with a piece of loose sandpaper... unknown to me that was a big hidden split on one of the edges... slid my hand right into it... got a big splinter that went through 3 fingers. this was oak... got most of the splinter out... but the numerous little splinters festered and I can tell you it was very painful! I imagine bamboo can be very sharp. also very beautiful. should be some cool colors in that.
    1 point
  40. This is going to be worth following
    1 point
  41. Twisting the pickup to match the frets (or at least the degree of scale length difference between treble and bass) in theory should be the equivalent of putting that same pickup perpendicularly at the equivalent relative position along the strings' length on a non-multiscale guitar. For example if you positioned the bridge pickup squarely on a single scale length guitar at, say 90% of the string length, to get the same positioning on a multiscale guitar and maintain the same 90% string length for all six strings the pickup has to adopt a reverse slant to match the differing scale lengths of ea
    1 point
  42. The Master Luthier Veijo Rautia tutoring our course is a pickup maker as well. I once asked how important it is to get the pole pieces match with the strings. He supposed that the magnetic field is so large that a single mm or two either way shouldn't be audible. When slanted one end of the pickup would be closer to the bridge than the other. The closer to the bridge the pickup is the thinner and snappier the sound which is why the Strat and Tele bridge pickup is slanted towards the neck on the bass side to give some beef, but as you know the humbuckers in the same position are straight.
    1 point
  43. I'm not sure there's any information floating around as to the effects of rotating the pickup such that the poles of the humbucker bobbin pairs purposely misalign from the strings by a few degrees. There might be some kind of tonal difference, but I've no idea what it might be. My gut feel would be that any degree of change in tonality is dependent on the amount of twist of the pickup away from perpendicular (5 degrees of tilt may sound less noticeable than 10), but it would take a fair degree of twist before you really noticed anything significant, by which point you're probably more concerne
    1 point
  44. Frets are in. Time to sand and then clear coat.
    1 point
  45. @willliam_q I’m INTP. Sophomore year in high school, last day of school, I saw a guy I knew come from the woodshop with a semi-hollow he tried to make. It was mesmerizing. I’d started playing guitar after being smitten by an ad for a Fender Lead II, and was struck by the romantic mechanical nature of the thing. Since I had taken every single woodshop class, the teacher basically said build what you want, just tell me the wood you need. I told him I needed billets of African mahogany 2” thick and built a Flying V. He got me beautiful pieces!! Anyhoo, after working on tons of other parts gu
    1 point
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