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    Prostheta

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/21/2021 in all areas

  1. So there I was, having finished this guitar, https://www.projectguitar.com/forums/topic/54223-a-%E2%80%98telecaster%E2%80%99/ with this spare ‘Mighty Mite’ neck I hadn’t used. What to do with it? Well the answer’s obvious. What’s more, stepson had mentioned that grandson was learning to play, so problem solved. I’d seen a Tele that one of the Fender custom shop luthiers, Fred Stuart, had made. He loved the old Martin acoustics , so he’d made one with a spruce top, herringbone binding, tortoise pickguard, mahogany neck, etc., which gave me the idea of what to do with this one. I decided to make it more of a ‘traditional’ Tele with a modern Tele bridge, metal control plate and knobs and a pick guard, and one or two personal touches; a spruce top, a forearm contour and binding and a belly cut. I started with a one-piece khaya slab for the body. I hollowed it out in a similar manner to a ‘Thinline’ to counteract the weight of the metal hardware and keep the weight down as much as possible. The cavities are slightly different, because of the forearm contour. The spruce top will only be about 3mm thick to allow me to bend it for the forearm contour, so I glued in a support at right angles to the line of the bend. I drew out the profile of the contour and stuck it onto the body, then shaved it down almost to the line and finished off using a large sanding board.
    5 points
  2. Cheers! The finishing resin worked out like a charm. I sanded off the first layer from the back and sides through to the bare wood, and the surface is already almost glass smooth. Amazing. The resin does sand back reasonably well, but scraping seems to be the best way of spotting and shaving back high edges. Being (what I think is) epoxy, I opted to use Abranet to eliminate clogging and in three grades; 120, 180 and 240. A small plywood sanding block (maybe 30mm x 90mm, 18mm thick) is nimble enough to get over the convex edges and small enough to treat the flat areas around the heel. A couple of rubber drums from my spindle sander works excellently in the concave areas. All in all, the back and sides took maybe 90mins to go back to bare smooth wood at 240 grit. Sprayed with DNA (Sinol) just before I wiped it down to remove dust.... Pretty smooth, but a few small scratches to be removed later. For the rear contour, I'd made a handle with a radiused edge matching the contour minus 5mm for a plywood plate and sandpaper:
    4 points
  3. Next job was to get a couple of swifts at the 12th fret. Normal stuff of MoP cut out with a jeweller's saw, chambers routed out with a 1mm bit in the Dremel and glued in with epoxy mixed with ebony dust: In the meantime, Jack was able to confirm where he wanted the toggle and pots (we're going conventional 3-way, V/V/T) and so I was able to thin the ebony internally for the switch to fit - taking a paper template so that I knew exactly where the thinning was - and then glue to second top section on: And then this morning was able to mirror the soft carve on the bottom half. And any excuse for a mockup The fretboard here is longer than it will finish up (this is slotted at 24 frets and it will end up at 21 or 22) and so the neck pickup position will be 2-3cm closer to the nut - but it gives a general idea of how it's going to look: And actually, Jack has sent me some custom Mojo (a well respected UK boutique maker) wide-range pickups for it so this is probably a better representation, again with the neck pickup 2-3cm higher up than in the shot :
    4 points
  4. 3 points
  5. I use the fret slot to cut off the fretboard as well. Typically I just cut the twenty-third slot all the way through the board and call it done. I don't like cutting slots well enough to cut a couple extra that will end up in the bin a bit later. On the other hand, I don't seem to mind filling a hole with lacquer over and over again..... SR
    3 points
  6. And so.... We have a resurrection..... SR
    3 points
  7. Making chips and dust resurfacing the heel contour of epoxy. Ferrule surrounds milled out to 14,2mm diameter. Not enough shellac to prevent epoxy ingress, but hey ho. This will be painted over anyway. A handful of old standard 14x5 ferrules sit nicely. The depths of each pocket were selected so that the ferrules are only as deep as they need to be without protruding. Only the inner surface of these ferrules are a little marked up, so they're still eminently usable.
    3 points
  8. well... my router jig is adjustable in height so... idk if that's what you mean. also, I find cannons or hammers get the most use in my tool arsenal! Everything looks like a nail... er, um... cannon fodder.
    2 points
  9. It was all just a bad dream? I need a nap. SR
    2 points
  10. it's official... never even happened. bravo.
    2 points
  11. And then there's the immortal words of Derek Brimstone, 'If at first you don't succeed...then sod it!'
    2 points
  12. As mentioned, I tend to get very caught up in ideas and have to remind myself how the hell I got here. Well, this time it's not so convoluted. The principle design was to develop a working method for producing a carved top instrument, and to a degree this is pushing away from that, but not unmanageably so. Financially the hardware on one guitar is a high hit (over €300 on the pickups and tremolo alone) however by comparison to the thousands one pays for a high value production or a name custom, it's better. Being a working CNC operator and programmer with potential capacity to hit the highest levels of production quality comparable to top-end guitar houses, I shouldn't be aiming lower. You don't just dip your toes in, right? The way this clockspring unwinds is to produce the Invaders guitar (at the very least) and then develop the carved top programming on what has been built via that journey. This of itself has consequences towards what I was hoping to be the last build of this year, the Aria Pro II PE-type guitar. Mainly my thoughts have been centred around pushing myself up through the 5-axis CNC learning curve, which I think (without arrogance) I've managed to do exceptionally-well in 12mths. As far as carved tops go, I am still leaning towards the simpler "contour level map" approach rather than simultaneous 5-axis work. Mostly this is down to it being a more efficient process timewise, plus the end product still needs significant hand-sanding work regardless. Additionally, I feel that a contour map is easier to gauge when sanding than ball-nose endmill tracks. The rear contour of the first body shows significant compression marks along the path of the endmill where the absolute rotational centre does no useful work. That's a lot of sanding work, and in the context of a constantly-varying carved top contour, it could lead to inconsistency through over-concentration of required work in one area compared to another, especially endgrain. A cleaner contour map in the order of 0,25mm - 0,5mm per level sounds overkill, however being done as a pure 2,5D process using a simple endmill produces almost zero compression artifacting. I do realise that a lot of these issues are rarely considered or discussed amongst builders, and there's high possibility that they're not even as considerable an issue as I describe them (@MiKro?) however when wearing my manufacturing/optimising hat, ideas that are tabled and explored always help rattle out potential gains in efficiency, cost-effectiveness, reduction of labour, base quality off the machine or simple pragmatic rethinks. They matter. Future explorations will look at better workholding (possibly with auxiliary vacuum hookup) and 3D profiling processes. I'd like to see how far I can drive precision, such as adding 2mm corner radii around non-flat surfaces, etc. The binding around the forearm contour in the Invaders instrument is an excellent step towards that goal. Hopefully this train of consciousness text wall is meaningful....!
    2 points
  13. Not that one! Spede for other people's context:
    2 points
  14. The Telebusker Hey Everyone! Up for consideration is my 4th guitar/1st tube amp build. This was mostly built in my basement with a few trips to visit friends and family with a wider selection of tools. Shoutout to ArcticWhite from the TDPRI for the name idea. The inspiration for this build came from mashing together a vintage blackguard esquire and champ amp. I wanted a way to play electric guitar for short bursts that didn't require much setup. I was also chasing that "cranked tube amp" tone at household volume levels. The Specs: Reclaimed Pine Body 1/4" Baltic Birch Plywood Top + Back Fender Standard Series Neck (Maple) Tweed/Shellac Finish Hot Hide Glue McNelly A5 Signature Tele Bridge Pickup 1/4W 12U7 & 12K5 Tube Amp 12V 1.5 Ah Lithium Ion Drill Battery Quam 4" Speaker Build Thread: Demo Video: Pictures:
    2 points
  15. A router plane jig was an option but it would have required modifying the router base. For doing that I would have had to wait until the following Monday to be able to buy some plywood and then two weeks until next Saturday which will be the first workshop day after the hiatus. Killing a fly with a cannon, wouldn't you agree... For leveling the entire surface of a guitar with the neck glued on that would have been a real option though. I agree with the top, the little yellowness enhanced by the clearcoat makes it look even nicer. And the cherry red top looks just like mahogany so it looks like a mahog body with a poplar top!
    1 point
  16. would have been a good use for a router plane jig. I got an extra one but I'm pretty sure I'd have to mortgage my house to ship it to you!! at the end of the day... doesn't matter how you get to the church... just that you are there. I'm sure I'm repeating myself... by that top is really lovely in natural.
    1 point
  17. I made a bending form for the top and did a trial run with a spruce off-cut. The form is a peculiar shape as it got modified a couple of times before and after the trial run. The top being bent. It’s dowelled to the form to stop it moving around. The area to be bent is dampened, the silicone blanket is put in place, the wood and blanket are clamped and the heat is turned on. When it gets up to about 300°F the part under the blanket is gently pushed down onto the form and clamped. The blanket is allowed to cool down and it’s left overnight. It worked well, with just a little spring-back.
    1 point
  18. She is not wrong though. Yif you know what you are doing this can really help. Lots of roses can get a fuller and brighter blooms if you thin out the early ones. like many things roses are over engineered and produce to many blooms for their own good. but interessting looking body will follow this in detail
    1 point
  19. right on. that looks great. almost looks metallic. some nice curves there too.
    1 point
  20. for some reason one of your pictures or videos isn't showing... 7th down. looks good. the green and natural contrast is really classic.
    1 point
  21. I'll go in and do that for him just in case he doesn't get notifications. AIA, etc.
    1 point
  22. Been feeling a bit rundown the last couple of days (the usual winter lurgy) so haven't done much this weekend but did make a bit of progress last week. Got the control covers finished Fitted the neck and cut the tenon down - dry fit Did a load of sanding on the body, I used a damp tea towel and the iron first which raised all the bumps and scratches on the mahog before sanding, works really well! then I wiped on a load of thinned down cellulose sanding sealer on the back and sides, sanded it back a couple of times. About 3 coats all in all. Brought out the figure on the edge nicely, I don't normally seal before grainfiller but I thought i'd give it a try this time. A) To prevent the grain filler staining the wood - getting it out of the maple edge can be an absolute bastard. B). helps to prevent stain on the top bleeding into the maple edge, also a bastard. Then I did wax on, wax off a few times with the black grain filler. That stuff needs at least 24 hours to dry so I shaped the headstock, Then on to staining, I started off with a light brown water based Liberon stain. Found a tone of scratches so sanded it all back and did it again. and then a couple of coats of Angelus green. This isn't bringing out the best of the figure in this wood, but I've done multiple testers and Duncan was very specific about what he wanted. Although it does still have a lot of chatoyance so it should look pretty cool, It will darken up quite a bit once I've got sealer on it but I've spotted yet a couple more scratches I've missed so I'm going to have to fix those and go over it again.
    1 point
  23. hehe, nothing quite like fully admitting you forgot the lyrics. In high school... i did a benefit with this band... and we played war pigs and I sang... couldn't remember the lyrics to last verse and was not able to admit it (now in darkness world stops turning...). so we just did this extended version where I stalled by saying I wanted to see everyone banging their heads. I wish I had had the balls to just admit it... and then have someone remind me. Comes off pretty balsy, lol.
    1 point
  24. this was a happy accident in terms of the final shape - i originally misaligned the neck so had to redo the pocket and the resulting gap needed removing - i am going to use a volume for each pickup , no tone control, no switch a'la music man mariposa - question is what pot values?? bridge is a hot single coil and neck is a standard P90 - i'm thinking 250k for bridge and 500k for neck - does that seem right?? - finish is another colour shift paint job, red copper to gold.
    1 point
  25. Oh...my...goodness That's outstandingly good - let alone for a save!
    1 point
  26. Did you know it was going to end up at 21 or22 frets when you slotted it at 24? SR
    1 point
  27. As you may have noticed in the study there was not too much difference between the woods. A magnetic pickup simply doesn't pick up the acoustic sound, at least not significantly. But there was some difference in the sustain lengths which comes from the "springiness" of various woods. However even that doesn't matter much for the body as it's a bulky piece of wood with less than 20 cm being stringed (from the heel to the bridge). The neck affects much more as it's both longer and thinner so there's much more vibrations going on. Regarding walnut for body, the Wood Database is your friend. Comparing https://www.wood-database.com/english-walnut/ with https://www.wood-database.com/african-mahogany/ tells that European walnut is quite similar to African mahogany regarding weight, density, elastic modulus, modulus of rupture and hardness. Putting the values of walnut (+- some to get a larger variety) to the Wood Filter tells that it's quite similar to softer maples and harder mahoganies. Would that be comparable with a mahogany body with a maple top?
    1 point
  28. The ridges I'm referring to are the minimum stepovers left behind by the tool in its attempts to approximate a 3D surface at a finite 'resolution', if you will. Akin to taking a digital photo with a low pixel depth.
    1 point
  29. Thanks Mike. I think that modelling in 3D often leads towards treating the end product as a single arbitrarily-shaped object rather than a discrete set of milling operations with context. The work I do in Rhino is specifically geared towards developed a specific set of drilling, trimming and pocketing operations. This project has given me chance to practice producing arbitrary working planes, for example the rear contour. I derived that as being a basic cylindrical section in line with the Y axis, rotated around X slightly. Simple tasks and challenges such as this are helping to build my vocabulary of CNC tasks that are more complex in result but simple and defensible in the desktop product end of things. Adding tabs would be possible with what I do also, however I've never really gone down that road. The lever holddowns work exceptionally well, and having the workpiece mounted within a specifically-reference auxiliary bed reduces vibration very well. The machine is more than capable of doing what I am expecting of it, and in a lot of ways it is like an athlete practicing away from the competition. This all adds up to making my skills that my employer(s) can leverage that much higher. I've never liked the idea of taking a ready-cooked model into the CNC programming software as a STEP model or similar. Even though there is good geometry to work from, it feels like a lot of context gets side-stepped. If there's one thing that successful CNCing is built on, and that's defensible, built from the ground up, geometrically/mathematically consistent programming. Everything less than that quickly becomes akin to a poor grainy Xerox/photocopy. Yep, I definitely agree about how one builds a personal working strategy. I'm still balancing off best practice versus that, and it's a task sometimes since this is entirely self-taught. I do thoroughly enjoy it though, because it's all 100% achievement based on what I put in. Those are the best ventures in learning.
    1 point
  30. That's very true. Wood is just as likely to splinter, tear out, burn or have a poor finish on a CNC as it is with manual machining tools. It sits as a part of a larger process, and hence affects how other work needs to be done. It's very easy to cause more work or make other work harder by not giving it full consideration during CNC machining.
    1 point
  31. We're in the same boat, my playing consists mostly of three palm muted chords with a slapback echo... No metal riffs, just plain old hillbilly thumping.
    1 point
  32. If you already haven't, I strongly recommend you to study the magnificent work of @curtisa: Regarding weight, as there's several factors affecting how the tree has grown, the only way to know the weight of a certain piece of any wood is to weigh it. Walnut has been used for solid body guitars quite a lot so there's no major issues to be expected. Fumble through your storage and find a lightweight piece that makes a nice sound when tapped.
    1 point
  33. Probably not, but who knows? I usually crank up the reflectivity as a way of examining how light interacts with surfaces to help gauge how the virtual object will feel as a real one. It goes 75% of the way, but at least help you align yourself in the right direction. That heel feels very nice in the hand. Very pleased with that in spite of it being a purely geometric shape as opposed to something more organic.
    1 point
  34. A few years ago, someone made a router bit to put the radius on a fretboard. It was WAY out of my price range, so I didn't bother looking into it. Last year, I found another company on Amazon that makes one: Yonico. I'm confident that it's Chinese, but I can't confirm it. It's been in my list for quite some time, but I had no readon to get it as I haven't been making anything for a while. Then the price dropped from $25 to $12.50. Well, that's that! So there I was this morning, out in the garage, making a router table jig/sled. I was going to make it a box, but I didn't have enough screws. I was quite proud of myself for changing directions into this.... Then I started messing with it and remembered why it HAS to be a box. Shit. BRB I scrounged some more screws and now we have a box. A little time wasted, but life goes on. I took down and sorted through my pile of fretboard blanks and picked out a couple I was willing to sacrifice in the name of SCIENCE. I wanted to see 1) how well it worked, and 2) can I slot the board first. I decided on these two boards for 2 reasons. 1) I don't trust a glued board to take the potential stress of a truss rod adjustment, and 2) if the slotted board splinters, zebra is about as splintery as it gets, so it it doesn't splinter, we're good to go with just anything. Also, here's my feet. We can't go through a whole build (or whatever) without seeing my feet. It's just some sort of law of the universe. Best not to fight it. First off, let's test with some scrap, just to get the feel of it. I have some leftover test pieces from a cedar chest I made this past Winter. That'll do! Ya gotta stick it to the sled with double sided tape. A slow pass through the table and here we are... I only did one side of it, just to get the feel. It seems to have done it well enough. Let's try it with the maple/walnut board. Reading up on it, you should use a fence with it. The bearing is only supposed to be useful on the 1st pass. When you flip it over, the bearing will be riding along the part that already has the radius routed away, thus making it unevenly routed. THIS is why the sled HAS to be a box. Once you center the board on the face, you can flup it over and rout the other side of the board without moving anything. Being kind of a cheapskate and never having bought a proper fence for my table, a 4x4 and clamps make an excellent substitute. The first thing I discovered is that you're likely to get a little chip out on the end as it enters the bit, so leave a little length on the board, just in case it damages the end beyond reason. One pass later and here we are. I'm not sure if you can see it in the pic, but there's daylight between the bit and the board with the sled firmly against the fence. This is why you're supposed to use the fence, as I already described. Making a pass on the other side and this is what I ended up with... There are parts the bit never touched, and the second edge is thicker than the first. I had set the bit so that the highest point of the cutting edge was along the center line I put onto the sled. Well, seeing as this is all experimental test pieces, I ran it again on the 2nd side without the fence. This put the bearing against part that already had material removed, making the 2nd side deeper.... but the 2nd side was thicker with the fence, so what the hell. It turned out OK. Now, it's ENTIRELY possible that setting the bit a tough higher MIGHT have had a different outcome. What I DO know is that doing it without the fence left the board pretty close to even. So does it route it perfect? Of course not!, However, I am satisfied that if you spend a few minutes with a proper radius block, it'd be perfect. So the bit will save anyone a HUGE load of time & labor by doing all the hard work for you. You'll just have to add the finishing touches. Technology yet again makes out lives easier. On to the slotted zebrawoodboard! That one didn't turn out as well..... Clearly, that didn't go quite as well as the unslotted (mostly) maple board. The 1st pass wasn't bad, but the 2nd was a disaster. Could it be grain orientation? could it be that zebra is chippy? The only other slotted boards I have are an ebony one and a jatoba. Jatoba is significantly harder than zebra,... and damn near anything else you'll come across, and I'm willing to sacrifice it to find out, so let's go! The jatoba DID have a little bit of chipping, but it didn't tear out in the fretboard area as the zebra did so badly. At this point, I believe the chipout is due to the fret slots. One more experiment will tell the tale..... An unslotted black palm board. It's pretty splintery, as it's a grass, not wood. If IT chips out, it's from the wood. If it doesn't chip out, the the chips are being induced by the bit catching on the edges of the slots, just like it did when the maple board entered the bit. NO CHIPS! So the conclusion is: 1) The bit works just fine, especially considering it's price. 2) You'll need a sled to feed it into the bit. 3) You are best advised to slot the board after it has been routed. 4) You want a little extra length to account for end chipout. I hope this helps!
    1 point
  35. Love you too. Y'all have missed me cuz nobody else will do this.
    1 point
  36. OMG Not another one of those Hideous PACMAN looking Corvus POSs. I am outta here. LMAO!!! mk
    1 point
  37. The difference in porosity and oil content between the heartwood and sapwood is not helping the problem nor is huge range of grain direction in each board. I've tried flattening boards several times and never had any success. Except for just planing the curve right out of it--and that is not an option here. Good luck and be sure to tell is what you did if it works. Moisture and heat may be an option, sort of like bending wood on purpose for acoustic sides... SR
    1 point
  38. My digital calipers are on the fritz but I would claim it was flush and then I lowered the bit by 0.2mm (according to the adjustment wheel thing on the Makita plunge router). In any case, it should be less than 0.5mm. I actually think I don't need to deepen under the trussrod nut, so I think all is well, unless someone tells me otherwise
    1 point
  39. This is an exciting build-lots of interesting new ideas and a unique instrument. Looks like it will sound great.
    1 point
  40. True! Also I just realized that they are the only visible part of the instrument that is not custom and/or handmade in some way (ok minus fretwire, strap buttons, and screws) so it’s gotta happen. I think it will tie the headstock into the body nicely and save some weight as a bonus
    1 point
  41. I'm hesitant about sinking them into a tub although that might work. Then again they may warp back when they dry! My guess is that they've warped because there hasn't been too much airflow between them. Wood tends to cup towards the side that can't breath. I wonder what might happen if you laid an overlength piece of moistened paper towel between the pieces and stacked them on a dead flat surface with another flat board and lots of weight on top. The free hanging ends of the paper should slowly dry and draw the moisture out from between the boards. If you're going to glue them as tops on solid bodies the rule of thumb is that if you can pinch the gaps close between your fingers there shouldn't be issues with the top warping the body. Same with fingerboards and laminates.
    1 point
  42. I updated my workholding for the CNC. Scrap plywood, M6 allthread, M6 threaded inserts, leather grip pads and cheap plastic knobs. One will be removed for when the jack socket hole is milled through the edge. ....and this is what the CNC programming looks like....
    1 point
  43. That top sure came out nice. SR
    1 point
  44. Latest progress with this I decided to try the 666mm Scale which keeps the bridge position relative to a standard Les Paul. I can try it before I glue it in and if I don't like it I can swap it out. I also extended the fretboard to get 24 frets. I wish I had left the fb full length, really kicking myself over that. The joint will be under the 20th fret so hopefully won't be noticeable To router the channel for binding I set the neck up under the bench. The silly thing is the edge of the MDF wasn't square so it routered just the right thickness for thicker binding (not shown) The neck is extra wide so it should work out okay. It turned out right for the other side I got the fretslots cut and did a bodgy job of it but then that's what Super Glue is for! Then did the Radius The Graphtech Piezo arrived later in the day so now I have two to choose from. The Graphtech will need more components so will have to look into that later
    1 point
  45. HELL NO I'm not gonna try and carve anything! I'm much more inclined to do stuff like this....
    1 point
  46. I bought mine at the local metal supplier. That's the stuff they use for building frames for lightweight walls used in e.g. public toilets and such so if you know any construction worker or pass by a building site they may have some scrap pieces available.
    1 point
  47. A long beam has its benefits indeed as it doesn't cup the center of your piece. However, instead of steel I'd choose aluminium for frets as it's more lightweight. For rough work like you did with the 80 grit on the neck the steel bar sounds perfect, no need to put any weight on it, just push it back and forth and let the paper remove the material and the beam keep it level. That said, I let a company cut a bunch of 28 cm long pieces of a 2x4 cm aluminium beam. The reason for the length is that it's the standard length of wet'n'dry paper sheets. There was some dents and nicks but as aluminium is soft they were easily sanded level with a piece of 320 grit laid on the jointer table. They're quite nice for various jobs including fret leveling. The length is also suitable for sanding the neck as it fits nicely between the heel and the headstock. My necks used to be bumpy until I made those sanding beams.
    1 point
  48. There's nothing wrong entering the GOTM after such a detailed build thread. You've been both educating and entertaining us with your ideas and stories for a month and a half now so you're definitely worthy. I would think differently if the GOTM entry were your first post ever after 10 minutes of joining.
    1 point
  49. That's true. There's ways to go around that although 2 mm is even on the thicker side. I just took a look of trapezoid MOP inlay pieces, the widest was 43 mm across the fretboard and only 1.5 mm thick. I suppose your inlays are about 15 mm long/wide across the radius? No matter what, I did the math with a 12" (300 mm) radius at the widest end of the fretboard. As a 4 string bass fretboard is 40 to 60 mm wide, half of the max width is 30 mm. Thus Y (being in this case the "quarter line") would be 0.375 mm at the most and 0.3 mm at the least. Since your inlays are narrower than half of the fretboard you'd have to put about 0.1 mm more glue at either end of the inlay pieces to fill the gap in a radius bottom cavity. That's the approximate thickness of a human hair.
    1 point
  50. The area around the toggle switch is quite small and to fit a regular lp style cover plate would be a risky route and by the time I've done the roundover, there won't be much material there which will be more difficult when it comes to levelling the finish with increased risk of sanding through so I thought I'd go rogue with the control cover.
    1 point
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