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    Drak

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    ScottR

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/10/2021 in all areas

  1. Slowly slowly getting more done. I've got my bindings all bent up to suit, including around the horn. There is still quite a bit of charring as I said before, but in going to soldier on for now. Started working on the carve of the top. Used an angle grinder with a flap disc to rough it in, then a mix of sanding, files and the plane in a few spota to get it levelled out. I feel like there's better ways to do it, but they're the tools I have at the moment. Also had a play around with colour, so I think I know where I'm going with it now. Can't wait to see the colour on the bo
    3 points
  2. Yesterday I tried to continue with the aluminoum bridge construction. Needs more work but I think I am slowly getting there!
    3 points
  3. Surprisingly got good shoot weather today.
    3 points
  4. I disagree Scott, but thanks. I guess the pictures look better than real life! Friday night and Saturday progress... The wenge plates came in at 3.4 mm, and there's no way I was going to be able to bend wenge at that thickness, so I took them down to 1.7 mm. I used a bending iron to bend the volute area and then got it glued up. I used one of my sanding drums from my oscillating spindle sander as a clamping caul, which worked quite well. I then did all the time consuming measuring to get the headplate square and went ahead and cut out the truss rod access, which is
    3 points
  5. We are currently repairing a pool deck overlooking lake Austin. Apparently even on multi million dollar properties some contractors do shoddy work. Unsealed pool decks lead to chlorine rusting of anything and everything made of steel. Nice view from the deck though.
    3 points
  6. The name Beryl is from Galaxy Quest and the Beryllium Spheres, which the figure reminds me of. Beryl is a bookmatched Myrtle Burl, front and back, with a Walnut core. I started Beryl in 2011 and 'finished' it sometime last year. These things do sit around sometimes... I got it up to 2400 MicroMesh and just stopped, I just wasn't 'feeling' it. An hour short of being completely finished and I said NO. So I re-calibrated and told myself I could do better. Something I would like much more than the caramel look. It only needed to have the finish stripped, quick sandy-sand c
    2 points
  7. Browse a number of builds in here and you'll see a variety of volute styles. This covers it nicely. SR
    2 points
  8. my fav - allied lutherie. they have a new single action low profile that is really small and light - haven't tried it yet but have plans to use it in a wizard style neck at some point. afa neck/heel adjust... pretty much any rod (as mentioned) will do either but the direction to tighten flips to opposite depending. yes - the widened bit at the headstock. you may consider how it's going to fit in there and poke thru to let you adjust. I like to try to preserve that little bit above the rod at the end there... and instead of routing from the top I would drill into the hol
    2 points
  9. Did the bridge pup route. Tried on the TVs but I think I will go for the radiator buckers for a more Gibbie feel and more split/parallel/ series options...
    2 points
  10. I think its because I'm a straight lacquer guy, lacquer responds easily and well to a heat gun approach. And I've stripped so many finishes off, being picky, I'm kind of practiced at removing it now. Well thank you! I always loved the interaction of trees, lumber, and my interpretation of what's 'in there' to work with. I always try to work with wood, as a kind of partner, its a mutual back and forth thing.
    2 points
  11. They lost that years ago after Katrina. It WAS kitschy but friendly. Now it's inundated with tent cities and full of crime. Between Houston, New Orleans, and California it's an entirely new population.
    2 points
  12. Thank you so much for your kind words! The people from this forum have helped A LOT with this project!! The top is on! Closing the box! After careful alignement I used fish glue which has a longer open time to glue the top on!!
    2 points
  13. One word: Wedges! For addressing hard to reach areas like that one option is to pinch the piece between two boards held in place with clamps and then add wedges between the board and body to apply diagonal pressure. Let me draw it! Another trick is to use the bars of the clamps as levers. Use whatever you can - bungee cord, rope, another clamp - to pull the bars towards each other.
    2 points
  14. A few years ago I made a couple of guitars with a flat fretboard because I was sick of trying to get a decent neck. Yes they worked, got a decent low action and I adapted to them, but I just didn't like them. I bought a Stewmac Radius Beam after that and all guitars since then have a good neck with 12 inch radius. Just recently I got around to pulling the frets and putting a radius on them and I'm really happy, although they still sound exactly the same! Here's the story in pictures
    2 points
  15. 2 points
  16. Sunday afternoon progress. Shaped the headstock, drilled the tuner holes, and tapered the neck. The headstock to neck transition needs a little cleaning up, and a little scraping is needed in the tenon area, but it's close. Note that the truss rod is intentionally not flush here, I was just testing to make sure that the headstock overlay was in the right spot to get the rod into the neck. But the route is so tight I was concerned I would have trouble getting it back out if I pushed it all the way in... Next up, the fretboard!
    2 points
  17. Pretty much. That's why you'd want your vintage US car resto project to come from Arizona and not Florida!
    2 points
  18. OK. I CA glued the back and sides last night (this is really light and soft wood) as a strengthener/toughener and pore-filler. Sanded all that smooth this morning and on to the next steps. I liked the 'shield' idea so much I made an 'opposite' of it to guide my sandback. I laid it down and sanded up to its edges all the way around, -just- enough to see the outline, then I removed it and kept going w/o it. It's just used to help me outline my perimeter, once I can see the perimeter, I don't need it anymore. So, there are a few stages and objectives of the sandback to hit, and they don't all hap
    2 points
  19. So I used the spray shield in a whole new way tonight. I laid it on the body and lightly traced around it with a pencil. That made the dye job super fast and super easy. OMG it was pure cake and took less than 5 minutes. Took longer to mix the dyes than to actually lay them down. I used about 80% EDW to 20% Cherry for the outside. And the exact opposite for the inside, 80% Cherry to 20% EDW. Took two runs around the houses to blend them together and done. Yes, I know about the tearout around the 3-way switch, I patched it up long ago, it just stands out now there's dye on it. Thank t
    2 points
  20. Not quite, dammit: The glue hasn't separated. There's actually a slight deformation in the underside of the fret board near the soundhole, and the shim has simply deformed to match it when it was glued on. I'm willing to bet with my inexperience in removing the fret board extension I've slightly crushed the rosewood on that edge. It was this corner of the fret board I started working from when initially trying to get it to separate from the soundboard. I'm not going to remove the whole neck to fix this one little gap, so I'll use a mini shim to fill it instead. This time it is
    2 points
  21. Thank you! Now I have to look up volute!! So cut the channel as directed in the instructions except we have the widened bit of channel at the headstock for the nut? Or are there some other tricks? I appreciate the quick response. Chris
    1 point
  22. Good advice from both of these guys. And I've done both myself.....all three actually. I've been satisfied with the repair job, and have done some minor reshaping and used a burst in different situations. So yeah, odds are you'll get a chance to try another "fix" in the future as well. Consider it part of the learning curve...which one never really comes out of. SR
    1 point
  23. You aren't the first to mess up with a router and you won't be the last. Save looks good though. If you really hate it then you've got an excuse to try a burst
    1 point
  24. Although it can be seen, the grain matches surprisingly well! I'd say the patch is as good as a patch can get. If it starts to bug you, reshaping the horn a bit shorter can easily be explained as improving playability on the highest frets...
    1 point
  25. Hey thanks so much!! I hope she turns out to be as I imagine her! Twangy, yet warm with a vintage-oriented sound! Before I start building a binding jig I figured I would cut frets. This one will sport a zero fret as per many oddball guitars!
    1 point
  26. I must add this because its so hysterically funny. If you look at the neck headstock veneer I removed above... That neck 'was' relegated for the Beryl build. The headstock didn't match that caramel finish so well, ...but it was OK. If you look at the re-spray to the Bery build, the headstock (removed, above) would now be a Dead Perfect Match. I was 48 hours ahead of myself in removing that. I mean, I had no idea what I was going to do with the Beryl before I shot and clearcoated it, so there was no way to know. But now, I have to laugh its so hilarious.
    1 point
  27. Honey locust has a nice looking very hard wood .... and goes to great lengths to keep it. Wicked thorns. You are correct though, it's not bois d' ark or bodark. That's another name for Osage orange or hedge apple or plain hedge where I grew up.. Honey locust burns nearly as hot as mesquite, but not as tasty smoke wise. Bodark burns hotter still, but its smoke is somewhat toxic and not safe to cook over. Does a good job of repelling bugs though. Where I grew up folks used to break the hedge apples and spread them around their foundations as a bug repellent. Squirrels love to eat them.....b
    1 point
  28. Such beautiful trees out here... a little spikey though. The hand is just for size reference. The scratches are from playing with my cat, not the tree.
    1 point
  29. I've always liked the Hipshot Hardtail bridges. Nice and chunky but no sharp edges to worry about. Their retrofit unit for the Ibanez Gibraltar bridge also has that beefy but comfy look.
    1 point
  30. You're right, the wood was gorgeous to start with but it was just a piece of figured lumber. The middle version somehow reminds me of the covers of the Sandman comics by Neil Gaiman, both because of the gloominess and the figuration, just beyond being able to actually see what the picture is about. There's been several threads about removing the finish but your method beats them all! And... the end result is fantastic! There's stories untold starting from the Big Bang, the all-seeing eyes of an Almighty Creator, their will stirring swirling Galaxies from the flaming Chaos in the Infi
    1 point
  31. This being on top of a hill that empties into Lake Austin, I'd be surprised if a saltwater pool were legal. Austin really has a lot of restrictions about lake pollution.
    1 point
  32. Ok here is the most recent update. I have removed a lot of the excess wood with the band saw on boards 2, 3 and 4. And I've started blending in areas that get missed by the bandsaw with a 60 grit disc on my angle grinder. I've also cut out the notches for the front legs. My next step with the seat is the clean up the front leg notches with my router plane and then I can do the rebates (the router bits I ordered have arrived) for the front and back legs. After that there is a bit more shaping to be done with the angle grinder and then I can glue up the seat. Front on vi
    1 point
  33. Engineer was out today. He said no saltwater in this one.
    1 point
  34. I have nothing of value to add, anything offered would expose my skill level -- but your work is sire impressive. Looking forward to seeing the finished product. Keep the pictures coming!
    1 point
  35. Just a bit of progress ... my work window is limited as my 'workshop' is directly underneath the master bedroom -- and the wife forbids power tools or any sort of "banging around" after 9pm. I gotta get a bigger shed, with power. I dream.
    1 point
  36. Thanks guys! Plenty of progress today. I got the fretboard glued on, here's this build's obligatory 'all the clamps' picture: Then I got the fretboard routed flush with the neck and went ahead and knocked out the first carving session. Looking solid so far, think it's going to be nice. And a quick glamour shot of how the neck and the body will look together: I haven't mentioned it, but the tenon will be visible all the way to the bridge pickup. I've done the exposed tenon look on a couple of other builds and I really love it when there
    1 point
  37. I finally have some update with the ol axe (I'm a horticulturist for a living and I'm hella busy at this time of year, leaving me tired and exhausted at the end of the day - no energy for the rebuild). I tried clamping the body closed to see if the cracks could be shut, but the angles of the body, and my novice with clamps, made it difficult to determine where and how I should clamp. Also, the neck pocket crack (part of it) is in a diagonal direction to the planes I can clamp. the meantime, I sanded my sample Khaya/African Mahogany to 220, and have tried staining some Angelus leather dyes
    1 point
  38. I just love how you make them look loved instead of abused!
    1 point
  39. So...on to the rear treatment. The back is a 3/16" Spruce piece that was destined for an acoustic guitar top about 15 years ago. I needed the additional 3/16" depth, it was available, and light, which keeps with the original design. That also allowed me to do the cavity cover cutout as an integral feature. So...I really liked and enjoyed doing the distressed finish I did to the Oak guitars and decided to implement it here as well. Which means shooting tinted finish, then sanding it back to taste, which I did. If you want to do this, best to apply it in the early
    1 point
  40. I know what a capacitor is and I've done some recapping for motherboards but when it comes to understanding electronics... To me it's as mysterious as women!
    1 point
  41. I like the way you tied it to the end of your fretboard. SR
    1 point
  42. In this case the steel was installed in 2012. No steps were taken to properly seal the edge where the pool meets the concrete deck surface and then they put limestone paving stones on top of the concrete to effectively hide the fact that high chlorine pool water was draining through in improper places. Now of course they have to remove all the limestone and seal the gap. It's just sad that these steps were skipped because the owner likely accepted the lowest bid. To make it worse, the engineer is half-assing the repairs to cut down costs for the contractor. He keeps talking about i
    1 point
  43. Thanks Georg, I've made some minor progress on it, not as much as I'd like. I've carved out the back, cut f-hole and done all the holes for electronics. The bottom of that blade switch is a bit close for comfort, I certainly won't be using a random orbital in that department I'm planning to go for custom24 wiring: 1. Neck hum 2. Neck and bridge outer coils 3. Neck hum + bridge hum 4. Neck single + bridge hum 5. Bridge hum With the addition of a mini toggle so positions 1 and 5 can be switched to single coil too. If I can pull that off without it looking like a dogs dinner,
    1 point
  44. Thanks guys! More sanding... I think the 'ice cream sandwich', as Scott called it, is looking pretty good. And the control cavity access has been cut. It's about as small as I could practically make it and still have reasonable access to solder in there. The cavity cover will be wenge to match the fretboard and headstock overlay/backstrap. That is if LMI ever ships my stuff...
    1 point
  45. So the fretboard and headplate/backstrap still haven't shipped from LMI, which is putting a damper on working on the neck. I got the truss rod installed, flattened the back of the headstock, and started to very roughly work on the thickness of the neck. But without the fretboard and whatnot in hand, I'm not going any further. The paper headstock cutout in the picture is something like the 6th or 7th iteration. It probably doesn't look any different without any context, but it has been repeatedly tweaked! And maybe, possibly, hopefully that's the final shape... Since I go
    1 point
  46. I like how the kerfed bracing works!! Bendy!! I will try to sand it to perfection!
    1 point
  47. I can picture Nikki Sixx playing the red one
    1 point
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