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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/04/2020 in all areas

  1. Okie dokie, that's a wrap! This is really my first proper commissioned build, and I'll be delivering it to its new owner later this evening. Really hope he digs it! I sold some guitars I built a while back, somewhere around 12-14 years ago, but I've never taken someone else's "dream design" all the way from sketches to finished guitar before. Honestly it was a pretty nerve-wracking experience. This is probably the best sounding guitar I've ever built though, and has a looot of natural/acoustic sustain for some reason. I'll post some video/audio in a bit.
    11 points
  2. The Telebusker Hey Everyone! Up for consideration is my 4th guitar/1st tube amp build. This was mostly built in my basement with a few trips to visit friends and family with a wider selection of tools. Shoutout to ArcticWhite from the TDPRI for the name idea. The inspiration for this build came from mashing together a vintage blackguard esquire and champ amp. I wanted a way to play electric guitar for short bursts that didn't require much setup. I was also chasing that "cranked tube amp" tone at household volume levels. The Specs: Reclaimed Pine Body 1/4" Baltic Birch Plywood Top + Back Fender Standard Series Neck (Maple) Tweed/Shellac Finish Hot Hide Glue McNelly A5 Signature Tele Bridge Pickup 1/4W 12U7 & 12K5 Tube Amp 12V 1.5 Ah Lithium Ion Drill Battery Quam 4" Speaker Build Thread: Demo Video: Pictures:
    9 points
  3. Final pictures - looks like its all set up and ready to go! Cheers and thanks for all help guys!
    9 points
  4. Bit more progress with this. Apologies for the post being a bit pic-heavy. The pickups arrived. The pickups themselves have a bottom multi-wire connector which, with the three way switch supplied, gives the three options of 'P' bass' (diagonal split); 'Jazz bass' ( single coil); Humbucker. They are passive, so the only connections needed to the PCB on each switch is a ground, a hot out and a 9v in to drive the LEDs: A wants a straightforward 'off/on' for each with a master volume and a master tone. We decided on this as a layout: With those large connectors, I needed to make some pretty large cable channels in the rear wing. Note also the cutaways for the battery to slot into. I did a 'spare' just in case of a change of mind of the switch layout: So now I could glue the wing on, deepen the control chamber and round the edges: And then onto the pickup chambers. As you know, I hate routers - but there are times when only a router will do. My way of trying to limit the damage potential is to use - wherever possible - a router bit that it fully captive and can't go off and do unsociable things. With the normal warning that this is just how I personally do it and not that 'this is how it should be done', what I do first is mark out the pickup outline + 0.5mm clearance on the top. I then drill the corners with a decent bradpoint 1mm diameter bigger than that of the pickup corner: I then hog out with a forstner right up to the line: I use a sharp chisel, again up to the line, to create an accurate line joining the drill-hole tangents, down to about 10mm. This is what the router bearing will run along. Note I've broken through to the channels I made in the back wing to get those sizable connector through: Then, I use a flush bearing bit to tidy the sides up and bring it to full depth: And finally I chiselled the cutout for the connector block sitting at the bottom of each pickup. This then allows the pickups to drop down, if required, to the lowest practical position: So, as this is the last flat router surface I need, I can now glue on the fretboard and start the neck carve - which are the next two jobs As always, thanks for looking
    9 points
  5. Purple Hummingbird This is my second build, a long nights and weekends garage project. I was inspired by the PRS Special Semi Hollow and the PRS Northern Lights color scheme. I really pushed myself in this second build after completing a simpler one last year. I loved the process of building this guitar with its curvy features, and experimenting with the color scheme until I got to a satisfactory results. The Hummingbird is light, beautiful, very playable and sounds great! Body: Semi-hollow body, quilted maple front and back with a mahogany core. Neck: Quilted maple. 25" scale, Madagascar Rosewood fretboard, 10" radius with Abalone inlays. Quilted maple headstock with a hummingbird inlay. Pickups: Bridge and Neck Paul Reed Smith 85/15, and a Seymour Duncan SL59-1 in the middle Controls: Volume, Tone, Coil tap switches for Neck and Bridge pickups, and a 5-way rotary switch. PRS locking tuners and PRS Stoptail bridge
    8 points
  6. Forgive the self indulgence As always, thanks for looking, folks
    8 points
  7. Now I had to find a veneer to cover the bevel. First I needed to make a template. I stuck a piece of paper onto the bevel using repositionable spray adhesive and traced the outline with a pencil. A few years ago I made a bass ukulele (not the one further up this thread, another one) but only had guitar-size back and side sets, which left me with some large rosewood off-cuts. I stuck my tracing onto an off-cut and cut it out leaving about 3 mm all round. I sanded the veneer down to about 1.25 mm thick (flexible enough to bend easily around the bevel) and it’s ready to be glued on. Gluing the veneer onto the body was rather stressful the other time I did it. It has to be bent round the bevel and taped in place whilst it’s trying to slither around because of the glue and if I don’t get it lined up properly and the glue starts to grab I’m in a mess, so I thought of a way to try to make sure that didn’t happen . I used my paper template to trace the outline of the bevel on the inside of the veneer. Then I stuck 5 little blocks of softwood cut at 45° onto the veneer with just a tiny dab of glue. These should enable me to position the veneer on the bevel perfectly (I hope!) Hope there’s enough tape on there. Fingers crossed. Tape off. It looks to be OK. After some VERY careful trimming, especially at each end where the veneer tapers down to nothing, with spokeshave, chisels and cabinet scraper it looked like this.
    7 points
  8. Well I may as well kick things off for this month. This is my second scratch build (ironically finished before my first). I built it partly at home and partly at a woodworking club I am a part of. I made it because everyone needs a strat in their collection and it gives me some more experience prior to fully delving into more complicated builds like my 12-string Rick Copy. Name - Desert Colours Body - Australian Red Cedar Neck - Queensland Maple Fretboard - West Australian Sheoak There are side dots but obviously no fretboard dots because I didn't want to interrupt the figure of the wood. Scale - 25.5" Weight - 2.9kg (6lbs 6oz) Grover locking tuners Tusq nut. Pickups are my own winds with Alnico 2 magnets. Bridge - 6k Middle - 5.85k Neck - 5.68k Master Volume, Master Tone and Fralin Blend Pot Mod The finish is clear acrylic lacquer sprayed with a DeVilbiss GPI spray gun. It was the my first time using a decent quality spray gun and the finish off the gun was far better than anything I'd achieved before which meant I had minimal wet sanding and polishing required.
    7 points
  9. So I trimmed the edges... And I was in love! The guitar became quite rigid after the glue-up! It kept the contour quite nicely!! Seems to have no voids! I like it a lot! This is my first real hollowbody build and I am super excited!! Thanks! I enjoy the process very much!!
    7 points
  10. Unclamped everything and roughed in the body today, really happy with the way the bevel joint came out! Nice and crisp. These were taken with the wood wet to show figure/grain, and man is that mahogany red! I pulled the color saturation DOWN on these images and it still looks super red; look how different it looks compared to my bench. Im used to mahogany looking more brown/gray, this is probably the most richly colored bit of mahogany I’ve worked with, glad he’s going to be keeping the back natural.
    7 points
  11. Thanks fellas, and no @Bizman62 thankfully not - this will have a blue/gray stained top, natural faux binding a la PRS, everything else left natural under a gloss finish with a satin neck. Some planing: Here’s one of the most bizarre tricks I’ve tried: my buddy wanted a flat top with a bevel for the arm, and for the drop top to bend over and cover the entire bevel. I don’t think he realized exactly what he was asking for given the quarter-inch drop top, but I decided not to tell him and tried this technique I saw Padalka using once upon a time. Soaked the wood and slowly bent it over a scrap body, keeping the wood wet for about three hours and slowly turning the screws every so often throughout the process. Let it dry by the wood stove overnight and came back the next day, removing the screws to find it held the curve quite nicely! No splitting or cracking and the top is currently gluing up on the body, which I carved to match the scrap body I bent the top over. Full disclosure, I’m not exactly certain this will work as far as getting a nice clean joint; this is probably the weirdest and most hectic top-gluing I’ve ever done, but I’ll know tomorrow once it’s all dried and the body shape is cut.
    7 points
  12. I guess its that time again. I had been using a thread that was 2 years old. I havent updated progress in a while. I had been working on a ton of guitars, but havent finished many. I also vow to do more in progress/ video tutorials this year.
    6 points
  13. A while back I was carrying on a conversation in here and noted that my later build threads didn't have as many explanations as earlier builds did. I felt like I've been repeating myself over the years and started letting the pictures tell more of the story. And I got taken to task for that lazy attitude. Apparently many folks reading my posts haven't been around for all of them. And they'd like a chance to learn what I've learned. So This time I'll try to explain more about what is going on in my messy little workspace. What is one of the most important lessons learned in here? Test on scrap. This guitar is going to have a curly maple top and an ash back and neck. I want it to give the impression of being black, while still letting all the pretty wood show through. So here is a maple scrap sanded to 400. And Now to dye it very dark without using black, which tends to make things look dirty. For this I used Transtint dyes--Blue, Burgundy, and Mahogany brown--mixed in acetone. Once dry I wiped it back with a clean rag dipped in acetone, but apparently I found those wipe back pictures to ugly to keep and weeded them out. Then I sanded that back with 220, 320, and 400. Then I took some of the first color and added acetone, more blue and lemon yellow. And wiped that on. And sanded it back with 320, 400 and micromesh 1500. The idea is to sand back with increasing finer grits and add lighter more dilute colors each time. I'm working to create mid-tones to go with the shadow tones and highlights. and the finer grit sanding polishes and increases the chatoyance. Next I dilute the original color some and wipe that on. Wipe with acetone and sand back with 400, 1500, and 1800. And dilute the greener color likewise. SR
    6 points
  14. Next job was to get a couple of swifts at the 12th fret. Normal stuff of MoP cut out with a jeweller's saw, chambers routed out with a 1mm bit in the Dremel and glued in with epoxy mixed with ebony dust: In the meantime, Jack was able to confirm where he wanted the toggle and pots (we're going conventional 3-way, V/V/T) and so I was able to thin the ebony internally for the switch to fit - taking a paper template so that I knew exactly where the thinning was - and then glue to second top section on: And then this morning was able to mirror the soft carve on the bottom half. And any excuse for a mockup The fretboard here is longer than it will finish up (this is slotted at 24 frets and it will end up at 21 or 22) and so the neck pickup position will be 2-3cm closer to the nut - but it gives a general idea of how it's going to look: And actually, Jack has sent me some custom Mojo (a well respected UK boutique maker) wide-range pickups for it so this is probably a better representation, again with the neck pickup 2-3cm higher up than in the shot :
    6 points
  15. My fourth build, "the Ochre Owl" or "Carrot", can't decide which is better. 25.5" scale superstrat Ash body, flame maple top, flame maple control cover, ebony board, Schaller tuners and bridge, EMG 85/60, pretty normal stuff. Satin oil finish, alcohol dyes. My fourth build so far, I wanted to push myself further with this. First tilted headstock, binding. Took some inspiration from Blackmachine B2 model. Neck profile is stolen from ESP Horizon, board is 10"-14" compound radius. Build thread: https://www.projectguitar.com/forums/topic/54166-couple-superstrats-coming-along Sound (and visuals):
    6 points
  16. The Annapolitan Elephant Built in my laundry room/shop, its my third build overall -- and the first bass attempt. Full 34" scale length with a Musicman style pickup. Since I'm a novice and still figuring out the basics I used mostly generic/non-name hardware and spent most of the budget on more tools. Despite the "affordable" parts I think it sounds great, surprisingly bright. The body & headstock shapes are my own design, refined from my "Teetotaler" guitar design. The overall specs match pretty closely with a modern Fender P-bass - my interests are more in aesthetic design and the woodworking rather than trying to trail-blaze new, ground-breaking specs. No chance of me stumbling on that anyway. Ash body, maple neck and fingerboard, with walnut inlays. Body is stained using Rit Golden-yellow dye and finished with Minwax polycrylic clear gloss. The neck and fretboard are finished with TruOil. The build thread is here: Thanks for checking it out!
    6 points
  17. Thanks! Bit more progress - other than a bit of invisible fill of one of the knot holes (easy with ebony), the carve is pretty much done on the half fitted so far. It's a very subtle curve but, certainly in real life, transforms it from the previous 'slab topped' look. I'm happy with this. I also drilled the bridge earth wire hole while I could see what I was doing. Oh, and the ebony fretboard blank arrived this morning!
    6 points
  18. After 3 days of intermittent tomfoolery with the electronics…. the result is…. NEW GUITAR DAY!!! new guitar day!!
    6 points
  19. Welp, can't have a month go by with no entries, right? This was my first "real" commission build - I sold some guitars that I built a long time ago, but never took someone else's design from the ground up and made it a reality, so this was a new experience for me. He's a big fan of PRS guitars, and his design choices obviously reflect that; it's the Custom body shape with a flat top, basically. He had a Strat with a neck he really loved, so I took some contour gauge and caliper measurements of that and duplicated the thickness and profile as closely as I could. Specs: - 25.5" scale, 24 Jescar stainless frets, abalone position and side markers. - Indian rosewood fretboard. - African mahogany body. - Curly maple top with natural faux binding. - Curly maple one-piece neck with 2x carbon fiber reinforcement rods. - Seymour Duncan Custom 5 and 2x Classic Stack pickups, 5-way blade, volume/tone/tone - Gotoh tuners. - Hipshot bridge. Didn't get a long demo recorded or anything, but this is what it sounds like through a 1987 Mesa Mark III+ And that's about it! Cheers my dudes.
    6 points
  20. So I finally finished this project and thought it might be fun to post the results here despite not being active for 10 years. Here it is in all its glory! As mentioned above it's walnut and maple neck-through. Finish is oil and wax. Closeup body. The top knob is a 4 way rotary switch (Bridge HB - Split Neck+Bridge - Split Neck - Neck HB). The other two are volume and tone. Headstock. The recessed tuners aren't by design, I made the headstock too thick to fit them and didn't feel like sanding it down. Back side. Some of the more visible mistakes. I took too much off of the neck and had to glue on a scrap piece. On the back the ferrules are uneven and I had to file two of them just to get them in. Also, mid way through the project I decided to change from having back loaded electronics to putting everything on a pickguard, after having already started to work on the control cavity from the back. I also got a bunch of wax stuck in pores and gaps. I've also broken three screws by not drilling pilot holes well enough! All in all I'm really happy with the project. I still love the design and it turned out pretty much exactly like I wanted. I think I'd maybe prefer a more glossy finish. Best of all, it's actually playable!
    6 points
  21. And while that glue is drying we prep the top for glue up. I hope to get two tops, a headstock plate and a control cavity cover out of this. And while that glue is drying, I finished my body shape and cut it out. SR
    6 points
  22. All hardware now on. Time for a weigh in. And for those of you who speak the historic language of pounds and ounces. A couple of shots from today. I'll try to get some better ones tomorrow when there is a bit more light. I just need to level and crown the frets then I can string it up.
    6 points
  23. Hello all!!! Back from the dead!!! It has been six and a half years since I have done any work on this guitar, and about 11 years since I started it. At this pace I plan to be done by the time I am 70. Anyways, I finally have some better woodworking skills and enough money to buy necessities. Plus, I am not a total moron anymore, just a partial one. I decided to sort of reset this project because there were a lot of issues: 1. The fretboard was way too thin -- I was warned by many on here about that one 2. The frets were not seated in all the way 3. I hate hardtail style bridges 4. Everything was just... ugly and rough and quite poorly done. All that being said, I took off the fretboard using a clothes iron and some putty knives and the back of a thin flush cut saw. I then sharpened my handplane and got to work making things flat that were supposed to be flat. Particularly the top, neck-fretboard joint, and the back. Didn't have to take off much material, so it wasn't too bad. I am going to swap the hardtail bridge out for a recessed tune-o-matic. So to deal with the existing holes, I got some plug cutting bits from good old harbor freight and cut a few for the string ferrule holes in the back, and the bridge holes in the front. I bought some cool macassar ebony veneer that I plan on laminating to the top and back faces (excluding the carved edges). Starting to think that I may as well just fill the front holes with some epoxy instead of having to drill them out and plug them, since they will be covered up anyways. I don't see how that would be an issue according to my googling. I also roughed up the neck a little when I was removing the fretboard, and I'll probably fill that spot up with epoxy and wood dust as well. Here's a veneer shot. Looks like it matches the general color scheme here. Not sure yet if I'm going to bookmatch it or just tilt one sheet to fit the whole face. If I tilt it, it would either have a cool effect, or look like total crap. I'll mock it up before I do it. Also, have you guys seen this technique for laminating a veneer? Looks really easy. https://youtu.be/dysWUDX6PdE So anyways, I ordered a bunch of parts, a new pre-slotted fretboard from LMII (no zero fret this time because I'm a big boy), and a fret press attachment for my drill press so these new frets actually get seated. Hopefully I'm not breaking any forum rules with this hyperbump! This time I mean business. Thanks for reading.
    6 points
  24. Davids CU24 finished, some pics of the finished Article. 50% of the garage is in boxes now so won't be touching the Tele build until I'm all setup in the new workshop - Not a bad thing because it's bloody cold in the garage at the moment!
    6 points
  25. My DIY bending setup. Test fit of C bout ribs. Test fitting the other two ribs. DIY Glue Pot Setup First two glued. And the other two glued. Planed the ribs down and corners cleaned up.
    6 points
  26. I'll kick it off with a resubmission, being narrowly beaten by December's worthy winner Name: Yeti Type: Custom Precision-Bass Body: Live edge English Ash, Epoxy Neck: Canadian Maple (scorched, engraved), Rosewood Fretboard Scale: 32" Components Pickups: Fender Vintage P-Bass Pickups (Passive) Bridge: Hipshot 'Kickass' 4-String Machine Heads: Gotoh GB707's Pots: CTS 250k Log and Linear Other Snaplock Strap locks Custom CnC Pickup Ring Custom Black Anodised Aluminium Truss Cover Custom Black Anodised Aluminium Neck Plate Build#: First ever build Experience: Floating shelves, basic DIY joinery Cost: Don't-Tell-The-Wife territory. Made at home in the garden and the spare room (thanks Covid...), as a 'thank you for being you' gift for a close friend and bandmate (nickname 'The Yeti') who has had a challenging year. Story/Process I began with a lot of research (how I found this site!) and watching things like Crimson Guitars on YouTube. I had been playing around with the idea of doing a River Table, but thought a similar effect on a guitar would be cool. Most other 'River Guitars' I saw were true 'River' style - with the Epoxy through the middle. Doing an epoxy edge instead of river-core had the bonus effect of looking cool and unique, whilst maintaining the structure and sound quality of the tonewood Ash. I found a waney-edge lumber yard about an hour's drive away. I walked out with 5m of rare English Ash (his words, not mine, something about a disease wiping the species out?) and some sequoia I'll use at a later date. Sourced the Epoxy (deep pour variety) from a company in Stoke-on-Trent. Components were a mixture of Guitar shops around Europe/UK + eBay. Custom Aluminium parts were made by a guy in his workshop in Pennsylvania (he was really hard to find). I didn't want to make him a Bass that looked great but had bog-standard cheap parts in it, so wherever possible or relevant, I forked out the extra cash and got something middle to top-of-the-range. This all began in September, juggling WFH with a toddler and typical British weather. The 'Indian-Summer' helped with all the hand-planing and sanding I had to do, as I obviously couldn't do all that indoors. Being my first build, I wasn't brave enough to tackle the neck (lot of specialist tools required for that as well), so I sourced a quality one and customised it by burning it with a torch and making a logo I then engraved into the head (as well as into the Truss Rod Cover and Neck Plate) The rough timber was hand planed, then a piece selected and a rough shape cut out. I did a 1st epoxy pour (blood red), and drilled in some secret long holes for the epoxy to go into the body of the guitar to give it a strong mechanical hold rather than just gripping the edge/bark. After this I cut it to rough shape, leaving space for the 2nd (Clear) pour for the top horn (again, secret 'foundation columns' drilled in). Then the final outline was cut out, and a 3rd Pour done to fill some natural splits and knot holes in the wood. I could then begin planing the edges into a gentle sloped profile (I don't like guitar that are too 'blocky', whilst keeping a 1-3/4" thickness through the middle. One thing I learned, is that before doing this, you should definitely cut out your cavities and pot holes first. It was fine, but made a simple job later on much more difficult. Once this was all done and the pickup and jack holes routed as well as the neck pocket, the whole thing was sanded to 5000 grit to keep consistency between the epoxy and the wood. I then followed Andy's guide on wipe-on-poly process for those who don't have a workshop, here: https://www.projectguitar.com/tutorials/finishingrefinishing/bedroom-builders-wipe-on-varnishing-r67/ . I finished with some Automotive fine polish applied by hand (as per the guide). The fully shielded cavity's cover was cut by hand from a piece of perspex I got off Amazon. The action and everything about it came out perfectly, to the 10th of a degree - so absolutely stoked about that. Two minor problems persisted: One of the knobs doesn't sit perfectly centrally in its pocket (pot alignment issue) by about 1mm. This will wear itself a smooth hole with very little use so I'm not worried. The other slight issue is that one of the pickup guard screws' heads snapped off when screwing in (from hand torque, which I find odd for a screw). He's a purist for finger-style bass playing, so no pickguard to get in the way of the beautiful wood grain. I am absolutely thrilled with how it all came out. It plays and sounds brilliant, and I cannot wait to give it to my friend. I also can't wait to start my next one - which will be a burnt-husk + epoxy + led + Raspberry Pi build for myself from the same Ash wood. Lastly, a huge thanks to the owners and workers of this site, for making a great place for people to come together and share this stuff - but most importantly to users @Bizman62, @Andyjr1515, and @mistermikev for their help and guidance when a few things got a little tough for a total newbie. You guys helped make this.
    6 points
  27. Name: Yeti Type: Custom Precision-Bass Body: Live edge English Ash, Epoxy Neck: Canadian Maple (scorched, engraved), Rosewood Fretboard Scale: 32" Components Pickups: Fender Vintage P-Bass Pickups (Passive) Bridge: Hipshot 'Kickass' 4-String Machine Heads: Gotoh GB707's Pots: CTS 250k Log and Linear Other Snaplock Strap locks Custom CnC Pickup Ring Custom Black Anodised Aluminium Truss Cover Custom Black Anodised Aluminium Neck Plate Build#: First ever build Experience: Floating shelves, basic DIY joinery Cost: Don't-Tell-The-Wife territory. Made at home in the garden and the spare room (thanks Covid...), as a 'thank you for being you' gift for a close friend and bandmate (nickname 'The Yeti') who has had a challenging year. Story/Process I began with a lot of research (how I found this site!) and watching things like Crimson Guitars on YouTube. I had been playing around with the idea of doing a River Table, but thought a similar effect on a guitar would be cool. Most other 'River Guitars' I saw were true 'River' style - with the Epoxy through the middle. Doing an epoxy edge instead of river-core had the bonus effect of looking cool and unique, whilst maintaining the structure and sound quality of the tonewood Ash. I found a waney-edge lumber yard about an hour's drive away. I walked out with 5m of rare English Ash (his words, not mine, something about a disease wiping the species out?) and some sequoia I'll use at a later date. Sourced the Epoxy (deep pour variety) from a company in Stoke-on-Trent. Components were a mixture of Guitar shops around Europe/UK + eBay. Custom Aluminium parts were made by a guy in his workshop in Pennsylvania (he was really hard to find). I didn't want to make him a Bass that looked great but had bog-standard cheap parts in it, so wherever possible or relevant, I forked out the extra cash and got something middle to top-of-the-range. This all began in September, juggling WFH with a toddler and typical British weather. The 'Indian-Summer' helped with all the hand-planing and sanding I had to do, as I obviously couldn't do all that indoors. Being my first build, I wasn't brave enough to tackle the neck (lot of specialist tools required for that as well), so I sourced a quality one and customised it by burning it with a torch and making a logo I then engraved into the head (as well as into the Truss Rod Cover and Neck Plate) The rough timber was hand planed, then a piece selected and a rough shape cut out. I did a 1st epoxy pour (blood red), and drilled in some secret long holes for the epoxy to go into the body of the guitar to give it a strong mechanical hold rather than just gripping the edge/bark. After this I cut it to rough shape, leaving space for the 2nd (Clear) pour for the top horn (again, secret 'foundation columns' drilled in). Then the final outline was cut out, and a 3rd Pour done to fill some natural splits and knot holes in the wood. I could then begin planing the edges into a gentle sloped profile (I don't like guitar that are too 'blocky', whilst keeping a 1-3/4" thickness through the middle. One thing I learned, is that before doing this, you should definitely cut out your cavities and pot holes first. It was fine, but made a simple job later on much more difficult. Once this was all done and the pickup and jack holes routed as well as the neck pocket, the whole thing was sanded to 5000 grit to keep consistency between the epoxy and the wood. I then followed Andy's guide on wipe-on-poly process for those who don't have a workshop, here: https://www.projectguitar.com/tutorials/finishingrefinishing/bedroom-builders-wipe-on-varnishing-r67/ . I finished with some Automotive fine polish applied by hand (as per the guide). The fully shielded cavity's cover was cut by hand from a piece of perspex I got off Amazon. The action and everything about it came out perfectly, to the 10th of a degree - so absolutely stoked about that. Two minor problems persisted: One of the knobs doesn't sit perfectly centrally in its pocket (pot alignment issue) by about 1mm. This will wear itself a smooth hole with very little use so I'm not worried. The other slight issue is that one of the pickup guard screws' heads snapped off when screwing in (from hand torque, which I find odd for a screw). He's a purist for finger-style bass playing, so no pickguard to get in the way of the beautiful wood grain. I am absolutely thrilled with how it all came out. It plays and sounds brilliant, and I cannot wait to give it to my friend. I also can't wait to start my next one - which will be a burnt-husk + epoxy + led + Raspberry Pi build for myself from the same Ash wood. Lastly, a huge thanks to the owners and workers of this site, for making a great place for people to come together and share this stuff - but most importantly to users @Bizman62, @Andyjr1515, and @mistermikev for their help and guidance when a few things got a little tough for a total newbie. You guys helped make this.
    6 points
  28. Lambda Guitars - Carbon14 This is my first attempt at guitar building, the second is in design and will start construction in January. The idea of making a guitar started over 10 years ago when my son started playing, but never had the time to make it happen. Moving back to the UK after a spell working abroad, and the lockdown, gave me the opportunity to finally have a go… It was built in my garage, I have some wood working experience from DIY projects at home, and a background in mechanical and software engineering. Had to buy a router and a band saw for the project. I’ve called my guitar brand Lambda Guitars, as lambda is the symbol for wavelength and I thought the λ symbol would look good on the headstock. It’s also the symbol for radioactive half-life, so since the guitar has a carbon top, it got named Carbon14 after the radioactive isotope of carbon. Some may also remember the computer game ‘Half-Life’ where the lambda symbol appeared throughout? I drew up the plans for the instrument myself, having taken some measurements from my Strat and Epiphone Casino as a starting point. Full scale drawings were done for the body and neck profile/side elevation. The carbon top was added to give the guitar an engineered look, and also for its mechanical properties. Being very stiff, my thinking was that it would transmit vibrations well, and give the guitar a bright sound and good sustain. It is certainly noticeably brighter and somehow richer sounding than my US Strat, particularly when played clean or unamplified. Spec Materials: 3 piece swamp ash body with carbon fibre top and aluminium binding, maple neck, ebony fretboard with MOP dots, carbon fibre control cavity cover and neck plate Hardware: Gotoh 18:1 locking machine heads, Tusq nut, FW47090 fretwire, Iron Gear Blues Engine & Dirty Torque pickup pair, unbranded bridge, 2 way truss rod, polished stainless steel torx screws for all hardware attachment (except tuners) Electronics: 2 volume, 1 tone with push/pull for single coil tap, 3 position pickup selector Dimensions: scale length: 25.5”, FB radius 9.5”, neck width at nut: 43mm, width at 22nd fret: 56mm, neck thickness at 1st fret: 23mm, thickness at 12th fret: 24mm Demos on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_SFKIKEZWRMKkwnC7SCKfg A few pictures from the construction (clockwise): homemade spindle sander, drilling fret dots, jig for gluing aluminium binding, routing the truss-rod channel
    6 points
  29. This build was a very satisfying experience. And thank you guys. I made it with your support. Its been lots of fun. Lutherie forever! Name: Nomad Specs: - mahogany neck-thru - ash body - finish- Tru-oil - pau ferro fingerboard radius - 10 - asymmertic profile neck - 7 string multiscale 25,4-26,6 - 24 stainless steel frets jumbo Sintoms - Fishman Fluence Tosin Abasi Set BK - 5 position switch, push-pull pot
    6 points
  30. So progress has been ticking away slowly, but I'm really happy with how it's going. Both the control cavity covers are now shaped. I've left them as a tight fit for now so I could press them into place and sand them flush with the rest of the back of the body without them moving around on me. I also had a feeling I wanted to do an inlay in the body to match the fret board inlay. After much laying out of pieces, procrastination and mulling over, I decided to do it. Very glad I did, I'm really happy with how it looks. I also played around a little with some Tru Oil on the back of the cavity covers, just to see how it looks, and it came out great, the timber looks like honey! Next step from here is to loosen up the fit of the control covers (at the moment I've got to push them out from inside, so I need them a little looser before I glue the top on) then I get to move on to glueing the top on! Realistically, this is probably all I'll get done now until the new year. Being in Australia, we're lucky with our covid response having being very effective and interstate travel being back on the cards for Christmas, so we're looking at heading to see my parents who are desperately hanging out to see their first grandchild for the first time since he was 4 days old!
    6 points
  31. OK - I think we are on the final furlong With grandparenting duties done for a few weeks I have a fairly uninterrupted run to finish this off. Jack and I have been doing some work on the headstock arrangement and he has come up with a shape that I think works beautifully. It gives a respectful nod to the original but is its very own. This is a mockup, but later today I will be cutting and gluing on the actual ebony plate. At the same time, I've been experimenting with some ebony offcuts from the top wood to see how well a 'no finish, just sanding & buffing' approach (think violin fretboard) works. The trials went well and so I did a quick and nasty to see how it works on the whole top. I know beauty is in the eye of the beholder but...I reckon it works
    5 points
  32. "The Twang Master" Woods: bookmatched flamed maple top, bookmatched flamed maple fretboard, bookmatched flamed maple headstock overlay, bookmatched ash body, birdseye maple neck. specs: 25.5" scale length, 9.5" - 12" compound radius, 1.625" bone nut, 6.1 lbs final weight. hardware: gotoh in tune compensated brass saddle "cut back" bridge. gotoh 510 21:1 magnum locking tuners. seymour duncan vintage stack pickups. allied luthier double action truss with maple sheath, this is build #8 for me... built in my modest garage. my background - I am a humble student of google guided by many here! special thanks to the forum -many members here were an active part of this build from inspiration to feedback to helping me keep my machines running and I must acknowledge that first and foremost! Many learning experiences on this build... first time cutting my own fretboard, first time bookmatching my own top, stuggled at many points along the way and the members here always there to catch me when I'm about to fall and/or encourage me when I feel like giving up!! This build was done for a friend of mine - kevin. He had been asking if I'd build something for a while and I finally gave in... this is the result. what makes it special? well the most unique features in my mind are the bookmatched fretboard, the unique design of the neck heel (profile goes right up to the attach point), truss access through the fretboard, and the radius'd top/cavity/back. build thread: video demo:
    5 points
  33. Cheers! The finishing resin worked out like a charm. I sanded off the first layer from the back and sides through to the bare wood, and the surface is already almost glass smooth. Amazing. The resin does sand back reasonably well, but scraping seems to be the best way of spotting and shaving back high edges. Being (what I think is) epoxy, I opted to use Abranet to eliminate clogging and in three grades; 120, 180 and 240. A small plywood sanding block (maybe 30mm x 90mm, 18mm thick) is nimble enough to get over the convex edges and small enough to treat the flat areas around the heel. A couple of rubber drums from my spindle sander works excellently in the concave areas. All in all, the back and sides took maybe 90mins to go back to bare smooth wood at 240 grit. Sprayed with DNA (Sinol) just before I wiped it down to remove dust.... Pretty smooth, but a few small scratches to be removed later. For the rear contour, I'd made a handle with a radiused edge matching the contour minus 5mm for a plywood plate and sandpaper:
    5 points
  34. Hi everyone, This is my guitar, Ulysses. It's named after the electric blue butterflies of the same name that live in the past of Australia I grew up in, North Queensland. It's the first build I've done completely on my own (I've done one before in a 5 day course) It's got 2 custom wound P-90, humbucker sized pickups made by a chap in Perth, Western Australia. There's a Schaller Signum bridge, Gotoh locking tuners and a 25" scale length. All the timbers are Australian; Tasmanian Blackwood for the main body, Tasmanian Oak for the front, Queensland maple on the neck and an aussie something something that I can't remember what it was for the fret board. I became a dad at the start of 2020, and had my normal share of adjustment headaches and stresses that everyone gets with being a first time parent, plus throwing in the pandemic and some unfavourable work changes and my mental health was starting to struggle a bit towards the middle of 2020. I decided to start on a guitar again to give myself something just for me to focus on; and something I'd dreamt of doing again 5 years after the course. The guitar was built over about 15 months by nibbling away during afternoon naps, evenings and the odd afternoon on a weekend. Here is a link to my build thread.
    5 points
  35. I totally agree, sponged sounds so much better, and it suits the action of rubbing the guitar down with bendy backed sandpaper, "I sponged the neck into shape', First go at a logo,
    5 points
  36. The head profile was then cut slightly oversize on the bandsaw. The grain of the maple veneers is so squirrely that it chips out very easily so I took the head down to its final shape on the spindle sander. Here’s the final shape. I had to cut that hole to get access to the truss rod and it had to be that big because it’s a double acting rod and the nut is lower in the neck than the normal Fender one and I need room to be able to turn the Allen key. But the more I look at it, the less I like it, so I decided to make a cover for it. I started by milling a slot the size of the hole but longer. Then I made a rosewood bung to fill the hole. It conforms to the curve of the headstock but it’s a little bit proud of the hole (about 1mm) as it needs a bit of clearance to be able to get it out easily and it looks nicer if it’s a bit proud than if it was flush. If you’ve been following this thread you’ll know how to get it out to adjust the truss rod. Press one end down and the other end comes up and you flip it out. It’s held in place by two small neodymium magnets and the opposite end from the magnets is bevelled.
    5 points
  37. And then you get more clear on it and it goes transparent. SR
    5 points
  38. Bit more progress. I thinned down the walnut for the backs and sides down to acoustic guitar levels - around 1.9mm The long-reach calliper I had was difficult to use because of the flat pads - it meant that it was only accurate if the wood was completely still and dead level...not easy when it's a large sheet of walnut in one hand and the calliper in the other! I rummaged around my 'general bits that might come in handy one day' box and found these from a set of old mirror fixing screws: Ideal. I ground out the centre screw, got out the epoxy and problem solved Without access to a sander-thicknesser, I always struggle getting sheet down from the supplied 3.5mm down to the 1.9mm. However, the last few times, I've found the easiest way is using my block plane (don't know why, but much more effective for this than my other planes) and then levelling it all out with the Mirka: For the sides, like on an acoustic, I find it easier to pre-cut the unintuitive shape of the bottom edge. I made a card-paper template first from its position in the radius dish: Transferred that shape to the sides blank: And then started bending: After sitting in the mould overnight to fully dry (which helps to avoid the bent wood to relax) I have a bent side... ...and a florentine end cap: The cap will be cut to size and fitted after assembly of the topless box. I will be cutting a piece of swamp ash or similar as a shaped front block to support the florentine and the cap will be fitted to, hopefully, have a nicely fitting and decorative - but not structural - function. I'm growing in confidence that this method might actually work!
    5 points
  39. The lower edge, or "horn", kinda hits the "cutaway" at a little under 90 degrees. So it kinda does curve out, but only by a little. The paper design for this came out in 45 minutes and two beers, so the next day when I made the template out of plywood I left enough material to make a few edits if needed; I can't remember if I changed the design of the lower cutaway part, but if I did it would've been subtle. After I'd cut the template, I had something I could actually hold in my hands and lap, and figure out whether it'd be comfortable or ergonomic - I figured it would, so I started building the thing! And as it's turned out, it's balanced pretty well on the leg, and it goes okay propped up on the finger: Queensland Maple is definitely not a true maple - I find it looks and to some extent sounds much more like a mahogany. But much cheaper, in this part of the world! Did the truss rod slot with the router in the jig. Marked out all the carves on the body. Going off what I mentioned earlier, I did the paper plans with reckless abandon, so on the timber I decided to take my time and really visualize what would look and feel decent. Had at it with an angle grinder wielding a 60-grit flap disk, for the concave parts such as the lower edge leading into the cutaway. The top edge was entirely rasp and file work. I couldn't get the plane in there, for the risk of creating a "hump" where the shoe hits the neck, and I wanted a flat but shallow bevel, so I just went steady by hand. And the back end of the guitar was also slightly concave, so grinder and flap disk made an appearance again, Really starting to look more like an aircraft than a guitar, which is about the time I started calling it the "Valkyrie".
    5 points
  40. Bonjour, I'm back. Meet HEPHAESTUS Type: Telecaster Body Materials: Solid Ash (Live Edge), Steel, Bismuth, Epoxy Resin Neck: Maple + Rosewood (pre-fab) SL: 25" Weight: A lot (haven't checked, but it's heavier than a Gretsch Parts: Rejected Korean Factory Bigsby, Wilkinson Roller TuneOMatic Bridge, Wilkinson Locking Machine Heads, CTS 500k Pots, 3-way Switch, Irongear 'Blues Engine' Twin-Humbuckers (series), Treble Bleed Mod (Bridge only) Hephaestus, the Greek God of fire and blacksmithing, was the inspiration and namesake for an idea I had about 6 months ago. I actually started a thread here for the build, but got distracted as I have entered this guitar into the 'Kit Build' of the "Great Guitar Build Off 2021"! (and updating both journals was really hard! The full progress was documented on my new YouTube channel here:
    5 points
  41. Here's my third build "Otava" (Big Dipper in finnish). Had so much trouble with this one, but it was to challenge myself as a builder. Half made in my shop, half in our backyard since it's summer. First times: binding, flame maple top, gloss nitro finish, fretboard inlays, custom pickguard, my own headstock shape, wood control cavity cover, made the nut myself for the first time. All in all, some "handmade" still shows in the details, but the guitar looks good and plays and sounds great. Tone is the clearest so far, probably because of the maple top gives is some "clang". Top was hand dyed with alcohol based dyes, green, blue, purple. Build thread: https://www.projectguitar.com/forums/topic/53946-third-build-hybrid-t-style 25.5" scale, ash body, flame maple top, ebony board, maple neck. Schaller locking tuners, Graphtech Tusq nut, luminlay dot inlays, EMG81, PA2 booster, Gotoh 510UB wraparound bridge.
    5 points
  42. I continue the sequence for a few more rounds and then quit adding dye when I sanded back with 2400,3200, and 3600. At that point I just finished polishing it right up to 12000. And then I wiped on medium CA with a gloved finger several layers thick and leveled that finishing with 300 grit. And then shot a few coats of thinned lacquer and then some black tint coats. This scrap isn't photographing very true to its color. When does it ever? SR
    5 points
  43. Aramat 6sB Finally done! Fully handmade guitar Aramat 6sB from Fruni Guitars. A lot of sweat and tears in this build but outcome is amazing. It took me something around 350-400 hours. Enjoy! Body: American Swamp AshNeck: Canadian MapleFingerboard: RosewoodElectronics: EMG 81/85Bridge: HipshotTuners: Gotoh SMTFrets: 24 - 2.8mm Jumbo extra hard (nickel-silver)Scale: Baritone 26.5"Nut: GraphTechInlays: AbaloneColor: Antique BlackFinish: Hardwax OilCostruction: Bolt-on (5 screws)Weight: 3,05kg
    5 points
  44. Erebus #7 Hello All, I build mostly for fun and for friends in my home shop. This one is my 7th effort, based on the 1957 Les Paul Jr. I did document this build and will be starting up a thread with all the gory details in the near future. Sorry for the less than professional pics. These were taken literally at the moment of birth on my work bench Cheers! Specs: - Korina neck and one-piece body - Birdseye maple fret board - 2-way truss rod - Gabon ebony headstock veneer, neck heel, and a "screwless" control cavity cover - Bone nut - Kent Armstrong "hot" P-90 pickup. Set up with a coil tap to have outputs of 10K ohms and 14K ohms - Vitamin Q 0.022 microfarad tone capacitor - CTC volume 500k potentiometer and an Alpha 500k push/pull tone pot for the coil tap selection - copper foil shielded control cavity - Tone Pros locking wrap tail bridge - Wilkinson "Waverly" style open-geared tuning machines - 5-ply "snakeskin" pickguard and truss rod cover - nitro lacquer finish
    5 points
  45. This is my sixth build and its a custom of sorts for a friend of mine. It breaks from tradition in a number of ways. Firstly the neck is solid carbon fiber laminate from panels that I had just hanging around in the house. Ofcourse the rigidity of the material means no truss rod. Also there is no fretboard radius, this was a conscious decision based on the fact that it the neck is totally straight. Anyway here’s the specs! Carbon 01 Carbon fiber laminate neck Superglue finish Design - Bolt on (actual bolts, not screws...these were needed on account of the carbon fiber. Scale length - 25. Woods used- Poplar Burl top and English Sycamore neck. Striped Ebony fretboard Inlays - gold leaf with epoxy Pickups - EMG 57/66 Locking Vanson Tuners Wilkinson Tele bridge Will try and get some clips up, been rather delayed on account of the current covid situation. Anyway, good luck everyone!
    5 points
  46. So... Today I sanded the control edge of the lower bout again to get rid of the diagonal strokes and then I redyed it. And tried to dye the edges a tad darker. The other woodworkers in that relatively small room must have gotten drunk from the alcohol fumes! I also sanded the center a bit as the alcohol soaked rag spread some dye there when I tried to smoothen the burst. And finally, finally I screwed a hook at the bottom and climbed to the "painting room" - a small space hung up on the wall of a small industrial hall, meant to serve as a locker room, a pause space to eat your lunch box and a small separate office room. Large enough for a three man company but highly inadequate for painting! 2x3x2 metres filled with a couple of benches and a mini kitchen... And someone had left his cabinet doors and drawers there to dry. After asking one of the more regulars I reorganized some space and sprayed the body with a rattle can. Within an hour two guys asked if I had done some lacquering as the fumes had spread downstairs despite the closed door. Oh well... Next time I'll sand the first layer of lacquer, it's meant to be more as a pore filler at this stage. But it shines!
    5 points
  47. I've been consistently playing around with different amp/control layouts and found the guitar volume to be a more useful control than the amp volume for this particular setup. This simplified my "wiring harness" a bunch so I switched out the 1M volume pot with a 250K and started wiring a relatively standard esquire. Position 1 has a tone control, .022 cap, 50's style wiring. Position 2 is the straight pickup, no tone control. Position 3 is open as of now but is going to get a transistor gain stage. I want to be able to test my wiring as I go so I threw a set of strings back on. Its already paid off as my volume pot was backwards on the first go.
    5 points
  48. I'm banking on everyone having run out of films to watch on Netflix here...but think of this as more a celebration of a great musician playing rather than the rather shameless self-promotion of the builder Matt still has most of my guitars and basses. He says it's because of Covid lockdown but I suspect that MrsAndyjr1515 is probably paying him a pretty sum to keep them over in the next county. Anyway, he's just put this video up. It's just an impromptu study in A, but it's pretty. On it is the Camphor Single Cut bass I built a number of years ago and my own 'Swift Lite' 6 string electric. Nice to have a reminder what it looks like If you like what you hear, do give Matt a 'Like' - I know he would appreciate it
    5 points
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