Jump to content

Ripthorn

Established Member
  • Content Count

    603
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    7

Everything posted by Ripthorn

  1. This is my Photon prototype build. I am hobby builder, working out of my garage. I have built about 18 guitars over the last 16 years This one is a design that was inspired by the thought of something in motion and by the bevels and thinness of the SG. Because of what I wanted it to be, there are very few off the shelf parts here: the switch, pots, jack, and strap locks are the only retail parts. I designed and machined the bridge, tuners, knobs, truss rod, inlays, pickup covers and I wound the pickups as well. Some vital specs: - Zebrawood top on Sapele, 1 1/4" total thickness,
  2. So many great guitars last month, I'll give this a whirl again this month: This is my Photon prototype build. I am hobby builder, working out of my garage. I have built about 18 guitars over the last 16 years This one is a design that was inspired by the thought of something in motion and by the bevels and thinness of the SG. Because of what I wanted it to be, there are very few off the shelf parts here: the switch, pots, jack, and strap locks are the only retail parts. I designed and machined the bridge, tuners, knobs, truss rod, inlays, pickup covers and I wound the pickups as well
  3. This is my Photon prototype build. I am hobby builder, working out of my garage. I have built about 18 guitars over the last 16 years This one is a design that was inspired by the thought of something in motion and by the bevels and thinness of the SG. Because of what I wanted it to be, there are very few off the shelf parts here: the switch, pots, jack, and strap locks are the only retail parts. I designed and machined the bridge, tuners, knobs, truss rod, inlays, pickup covers and I wound the pickups as well. Some vital specs: - Zebrawood top on Sapele, 1 1/4" total thickness, gr
  4. I actually have a piece in my stash right now that does the exact same thing. At first I thought that it looked like purpleheart, but not brownish as I expected. I cut some up to make an infill plane, and the cut ends were brown. Some of the offcut scrap that got left out turned purple. I thought it was backwards. However, I think what is really happening is that there are more than one species of tree called purpleheart, much like there are more than one kinds of maple, walnut, etc. This purpleheart I have does not splinter quite like other purpleheart I have used (and that stuff was pu
  5. If you overlap the joints like what is done with bowling alleys and the like, you can do it, but I don't know how it would work with stability or longevity.
  6. If the block is a good fit, regular old epoxy is a great choice. If it is not a good fit, the best option is to cut a block that is. After that, and if it is to be an opaque finish, Timbermate is a great wood filler that does not have the same issues that many other fillers have as far as shrinking, cracking, staining, etc.
  7. It is best to have parts on hand, especially for your first builds. Additionally, I would say to maybe try something other than spalted maple first. Spalt is a fungus that attacks the wood, leaving it very soft (often called punky) which in turn makes it much more difficult to work with than other woods. You can try it, but it carries a higher risk of ruining a nice looking piece.
  8. Perry, beautiful instrument. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately) I only build for myself. Otherwise, I would do exactly as you say.
  9. Whatever you're putting it on, I want to see it when you're done. I would love to use some snakewood, but I would like to have a positive bank account balance afterwards, too. Those two seem nearly exclusive
  10. There are a couple of ways of doing it. First, it should be done without any risk of it coming in contact with finish, so any sealer on the top will need to come off. Bleaching the whole top will give you the best uniform look. There are different kinds of bleach. Common household bleach is unlikely to do anything more than a very subtle lightening. Some of the woodworking stores sell oxalic acid, which is okay for mineral stains and the like, but if you are wanting a very light color, the best thing to do is a sodium hydroxide (lye) and peroxide treatment. You can use the heavy duty
  11. You can buy the blue two way rods all over the world, as they usually ship from china. Alternatively, there is PRS's way of making two way rods, which I want to try, but it will require a brazing setup, I think. They are a very elegant solution, low mass, and easy to make at home if you have a way to braze.
  12. A volume pot is just a voltage divider, circuits of which are all over the net. What you are changing when you turn the pot is the value of the two resistors in a voltage divider. The pot on 10 means it goes through a zero series resistance, but there is still a large parallel resistance (the pot value) parallel to your output (amp's input). Because the pot value is not infinity and the amp's input impedance is not zero, the value of the pot will affect the signal to some degree. The only way the resistance is completely bypassed is by using a no-load pot, which actually just has a little
  13. I recently did a gold top Les Paul and what I found is that by scraping the binding level before color coats, I ended up chipping the finish and is the one thing about the build that I kick myself about. If I were to do it again, I would leave the binding a little higher than the body, spray color, then some clear (a coat or two), then scrape back and shoot more clear. Then again, I have never tried it so I have no idea if it would work well or not.
  14. That all depends on what you are trying to build. If you want strat or tele templates, Ron Kirn's are really great. If you want Les Paul templates, Bartlett templates are great. Of course, not all templates will come with a neck template, mostly because a neck (aside from the headstock) requires creating two straight lines and the heel profile. I don't know of a set with neck templates that will be as accurate as you are wanting.
  15. If you make a floating binding jig for your router, it will follow it just fine. It's a very common build for guys who do Les Pauls. I didn't do one for my LP, but it's considered standard fare on a Les Paul forum. I'm sure someone here has pictures and has made one as well.
  16. Here is how I would do this: - First, take out all of the warping (whether it be twist, cup, or bow) with a hand plane, a nice sharp jack would work fine - You will need to resaw to remove that much material, otherwise you will murder any blade you try to do this with. You can resaw in many ways. If the blank is already all glued up to 20x25, you could build yourself a frame saw big enough to do it by hand (not as hard as one might think). If not glued up yet, you can use a table saw to get you most of the way there and then finish with a panel or frame saw. - clean up the side fro
  17. Alumitones are not a normal pickup. Their construction is totally different, and the humbuckers don't really have the separate coils like we traditionally think of them. This is why you can't split the coils. I've been wanting to try one for a while, maybe I'll get one at some point.
  18. My neck through explorer is finished in danish oil with two coats of paste wax on top. Nice low gloss sheen. The thing with wax is it has to be reapplied every now and again, but it's easy. Poly is applied only once, but to get enough on there to provide protection, you tend to lose the feel.
  19. Due to intonation issues, the general rule is to move the high e saddle most of the way forward and put that at the scale length (24" in this case). The low e will typically need to be 3/16-1/4 further than this. Of course, string gauge and action will have a lot to do with it also. If you are of an entire half step, though, that is really bad. To check your intonation, play the 12th fret harmonic and then play the fretted note. Use a really good tuner to do this so that you can see small differences.
  20. Looking great! I finished the woodworking and finishing on a neck through explorer a few months ago (still need to buy the bridge and tuners). When I was planning it out, it was almost impossible to find neck through builds of it. Yours is looking great. I think the explorer shape works really well with a neck through. I look forward to seeing how it looks when it's all put together.
  21. Here are a couple thoughts: - I used two blend knobs, one to continuously blend the two magnetic pickups and one to blend the output of the magnetic pickups with the piezo. This allows for a very wide range of sounds and reduces the need to fuss with the preamps trim pot to get just the right level between magnetic and piezo. - If you must use a switch, you will need something to deal with the two humbuckers before they get to your three way that will then be wired like any other three way. - For a preamp, I really like the Cafe Walter PZP-1. The design is on his website and i
  22. This will be my first entry to GOTM, but not my first build. I am simply calling this the MS Strat. This was originally built simply to be a beater guitar, but as I let the idea roll around, I decided I would try a multiscale strat, simply because I hadn't seen one. Believe it or not, this is my first strat, both possession and build wise. This is build 15-ish for me, made in the garage. No build thread, as I was too busy working to snap pictures and such. Just the results of an obsessed hobbyist. Relevant specs: - Basswood body - Chechen neck with curly maple skunk stripe, Da
  23. I use inkscape. Also free, has the bezier curve stuff, etc. I also use it for generating the .dxf's for use in my CAM program. I haven't tried to dimension anything with it, though, so it may or may not have that functionality.
  24. curtisa answered it really well. I have used hot rails rotated at an angle and I have left them standard. Both ways work fine. Change in tone I can't comment on because I never A/B'd the pickup positioning. There are some guys who will custom make a pickup for you, but that gets pricey. What I might try on my next one is going with a narrower string spacing and getting a humbucker with wider spacing and hacking it up as proposed, but my next multiscale build is quite a ways down the road, as I am just finishing one now.
  25. Using a different backer makes a world of difference. Also, the big name guys are using high end pneumatic sanders that allow for much slower orbital speeds than the little electric ones we buy at the hardware store. The closest thing to a pneumatic that isn't one is the MIrka Ceros, which I would love to have, but at close to $500, I will pass. Also, as with all tools, it comes downt to practice and dedication to perfect the technique. The guys at PRS that do it all day every day for years get to know the device so well that they can account for any kind of characteristic that we see
×
×
  • Create New...