Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'inlay'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Instrument Setup
  • Instrument Building
  • Electronics
  • Finishing/Refinishing
  • Inlay and Binding
  • Repair and Maintenance
  • Tools and Workshop Tips
  • Miscellaneous

Categories

  • Guitar Parts
  • Tools and Consumables
  • The Library

Categories

  • Guitar Anatomy Class
  • Workshop and Tools
  • The Tipshop
  • YouTube

Forums

  • Patreon-only Area
    • Season 1
  • ProjectGuitar.com Forum Guidelines and FAQ
    • Community Guidelines and FAQ
  • ProjectGuitar.com Guitar Of The Month
    • Current Guitar Of The Month Contest
    • Guitar Of The Month entry/poll archive
  • Build Area
    • In Progress and Finished Work
    • The Design Bar
    • Non-Guitar Build Section
  • Tech Area
    • Solidbody Guitar and Bass Chat
    • Acoustic and Hollowbody Guitar Chat
    • Inlays and Finishing Chat
    • Electronics Chat
    • CNC Chat
    • Tools and Shop Chat
  • General Topics
    • Site Feedback, Issue Reporting and Test area
    • Off Topics Chat
    • Players Corner
    • Put it to a vote
    • The Luthiery Business
    • The Marketplace
  • Forum Tutorials & Reference

Categories

  • Documents
  • Guitar Drawings
    • Component Drawings
    • Instrument Plans

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Location


Interests

Found 9 results

  1. I picked this body up on ebay. Someone laminated 1/4" oak, mahogany and maple to 1 1/2" poplar to achieve a standard 1 3/4" strat body thickness. I didn't mind, in fact I kind of liked it. I always hated a blank white canvas so to speak, so here was something to work with and hopefully improve. I was going to go with the strat shape but got turned on by some research of the Paul Bigsby guitars of the late 1940's. Could I honor his aesthetics in my own build? Hope so.
  2. its been an awful long time since I was on here and I have no idea why! for the last six months I've been working on this guitar. most of which was taken up by cutting out the tiny flowers - all 1300+ of them! I did this kind of thing before on an old shape and wanted to try it again, but make it better this time. today I carved the neck and all that's left is sanding and finishing pretty much. so anyway, some pictures. the front is carved (obviously) and the back is slightly curved from side to side - here with the branches on the top and laid out on the back heres the hea
  3. I want to apply an even amount of laquer to my guitar body so that it feels glassy-smooth like when it was original. It was bought used with various patches of hardened goop over the neck and body which I foolishly (insanely) scratched away with rough sandpaper. To make matters worse I applied some laquer to the exposed wood parts in an attempt to "cover up" the rawness thinking I could fill in the blanks and everything would be ok. I have a can of minwax clear gloss spray which I'm sure is nitrocellulose. I'm wondering if I should sand down the body and neck and then reapply some
  4. Not a typo - seems like I should have dichrocaster in quotations, but I put "build" in quotations because my Strat mod is not worthy of the title compared to the awesome real builds I've seen by most of you (still perusing through all your cool projects). I am truly impressed by what I have seen here, and blown away by the level of craftsmanship. Thats coming from a guy that majored in WW / Furniture Design at RIT back in 86 with furniture in FWW magazine's Design Book Six, so I know a thing or two about fine woodworking (just not luthiery yet). "build" also in lower case, because my
  5. StratsRdivine

    Dichrolam, LLC

    <p>https://www.dichrolam.com</p>
  6. We found this guitar at a vintage shop in Clifton (Cincinnati), Ohio called Mikes guitar. I am trying to find its origin or some information as to who made it. It has no markings on it, no serial number. It looks like a hofner violin bass but it is a guitar and probably a copy of the shape. The dragon inlay is on the front and back. Does anyone have any suggestions
  7. This technique has been around for decades now, and I'm sure it pre-dates where I picked the idea up from. Remember Fender's good old clay dots? This is essentially that same idea but taken a step further.... You will need drill bits corresponding to the size of inlays you want to makesmall drill bit (about 2mm or 1/16", see below)masking tapeultra-high density polyethylene kitchen cutting boardmaterial of your choice for inlays (epoxy, clay, recon. stone and cyanoacrylate, etc.)The basis of how this works is the ability of high molecular weight plastics like UHMWPE, etc. to resist adhesion to
  8. Before we get started let me just say if you have never attempted an inlay before, practice a few times using a spare piece of wood such as a 2x4, this particular method uses clear acrylic sheet for the main material on top which can be purchased in sheets for a few dollars and will render enough material to do this several times over so take your time and practice. My method may not be the same as others and your results may vary but it works for me! You will also need to have all of the frets off of your board unless you plan on spending the next year or so doing fine detail sanding between
  9. I decided to show you how I am going step by step on the blue shark that will go on the chimera headstock classical guitar for Dr. Douglas Fields. First things first; this is on a NON-radiused classical fretboard. That makes this one easier. It's totally flat. The board is ebony, also easy. So, this is an EASY inlay! Here is the inlay so far. This photo includes the original art, (lower right), the photocopies for cutting the pieces, the odder materials, (blue/teal plastics in this case, and black Tahitian pearl) other more regular materials include ebony, and regular mother of pearl. The inla
×
×
  • Create New...