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Found 2 results

  1. Fundamentally, two types of guitar neck construction exist; single and two-piece. In a single-piece neck the headstock is cut into the same piece of timber as that of the rest of the neck. In a two-piece neck, a separate headstock part is joined onto the longer part comprising the greater length of the neck using a scarfed joint. Origins Of The Term The term "scarfed joint" reaches back to traditional timber building and ship construction to denote a type of joint used to produce a long piece of timber where one single piece would not otherwise be possible. The joints themselv
  2. Hola! I originally introduced the idea of a compound scarfing jig waaaay back in something like 2007-2008. A few people around ProjectGuitar.com have successfully used the idea, and a few people around the interwebs have taken it on also....some clearly took it directly (including images and zero credit) however convergent evolution means it would surface of itself at some point anyway. It's all cool. Rising tides floating all boats and that. The idea was based off the established idea of a router scarfing jig, but improved to allow for twisted headstocks and even string pull for mul
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