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Found 14 results

  1. I’m trying my hand at designing and fabricating a chambered, solid body tenor ukulele. This is a prototype build to continue to develop my skills and to learn from my inevitable mistakes :) When I looked at the current set of commercially available solid bodies ukuleles from Godin, Pono, KoAloha, Imua, etc., I wasn’t able to find enough details to deduce how theIr chamberings are configured under the top. Searches of across the luthier discussion forums provide a fair amount of info and suggestions covering chambering/hollowing guitar bodies, but all examples I found were for instruments
  2. Yet Another Post! So I'm curious how you guys go about designing your guitar bodies! I personally do it all after I've found out where everything should be on the guitar itself. I then trace the shaps on tracing paper My own issues are proportions. How do you guys get your guitars into proportion? Tracing around your own or? Advice and tales fellas! Thanks R
  3. My project of making an 8 string guitar from scratch. I am planning on building an 8 string guitar from scratch. Im just looking for some advise, this is my first guitar, and i know and 8 string is not the best build for a first timer, but i have my heart set on it and i am fairly confident i can do it. I have basic woodworking skills and access to most necessary tools and facilities. I also have a mentor who has made many guitar in the past, although he has never made an 8 string and doesn't know to much about them. I have a budget of around $1200 - $150 and i kinda know what parts i wan
  4. Hey Everyone! Welcome to my new thread on my first proper guitar build! I've been designing this for a while and I'm currently doing an accurate drawing of what it will look like. I had help from people like @ScottR, @curtisa and more to progress in my design and make it better. So thank you to all of them. Here is the link to that thread. Just so you know, I have experience with woodworking and others so I'm not going into this with nothing. The Design So I have been designing off of a telecaster, shape wise, as I have always loved the shape. Other guitars I have designed
  5. Hi all - this is the beginning of what should be a long-term project going through many stages. The guitar will be a fairly standard two-humbucker superstrat, however the point of the design is to document the process from beginning to end. Part of this will hash in with the CAD series of articles I'm penning whilst other bits will be the basis for various how-to articles. A productive design despite being more or less a standard. Essentially, a guitar that anybody can build. Depending on the availability of time, I will try and make this using the most basic of tools and equipment. A simple e
  6. Adhering to some form of best practice is not a necessary pre-requisite of a useful CAD plan. In a non-professional capacity a CAD plan only has to be fit for the purpose it is intended for, rather than following an established set of standards and work templates. That said, giving a passing nod to best practice helps improve the quality and reliability of your plans, personal working methods and raising your game. Google search results for "guitar CAD plan", "guitar dxf download", etc. reveal a hugely varying level of detailing and usefulness. Some "plans" exist as nothing more than
  7. I am rebuilding and repainting a Johnson Strat that I have had since is was 7 (know 19). I am going to repaint it but I need some help figuring out what a ertain design is called or how to do it. The design I am looking for almost looks like really little tiger stripes but faded, no solid. I mostly see it on les paul models, or guitars that dont have a scratch guard that covers most of the body. At Guitar Center's website, their les paul page has a picture of a guitar with this print, but I can not find what the print is called. Here is a link to the Website: http://www.guitarcenter.c
  8. When one thinks of a guitar or a bass, it is easy to think that the number of angles on headstocks, non-flat shapes, radii and sticky-out bits plus various pieces on top of each other would favour 3D; modelling the instrument as a virtual item or set of items. A tangible real-world object often seems more appropriate as one possessing three dimensions. How is it that 2D is still the most appropriate design methodology for the vast majority of instrument design? In many respects, 3D is genuinely useful and definitely relevant for instrument manufacture. As soon as CNC milling becomes part of th
  9. CAD ("Computer Aided Design") in its most basic form is the electronic equivalent of traditional pen-and-paper technical drawing. CAD stores drawn shapes (such as primitive lines, points, curves) as precise mathematical representations or "vectors". Whilst this might seem an overly-simplistic description for anybody familiar with CAD, this description is as true now as it was in the late fifties when the idea was first germinated. That a technical drawing or "mathematical representation of real world metrics" could be electronically stored, transmitted, reproduced, manipulated, merged, transfo
  10. Many schools of thought exist on the design process for making a solidbody instrument. At one end of the spectrum there's the mad genius school of working directly in the wood by feel and intuition, and at the other there's the CNC gurus who design the entire instrument as a virtual model and have totally different concerns to the general enthusiast luthier. Traditionally, instruments were designed on paper (usually) in 1:1 scale by hand. CAD is not too far removed from this, and adds many layers of powerful use on top of traditional drafting. Through this series I'll be describing my personal
  11. Hi Everyone I'm new here, started my first build with this kit bought from BYOguitars Shape is in the style of an Scheter\ESP guitars Mahgony body and neck Maple top rosewood fingerboard Hardware: Humbackers that I took out of my Ibanez s Spretzel locking tuner Hipshot trem bridge tusq nut Those patterns around the knobs and in the headstock was printed in my home 3d printer
  12. Hi Guys, As a designer I have been busy messing around with my guitar and finding a new cool addition for a muscial artist. I the recordstore I found a bunch of old classis Vinyl records and was sure to thing of a cool way too upcycle these forgotten things. After some experimenting I came on the idea to try cutting guitar picks from these record, with great succes. They have the right handle, flex and produce a good sound. With the lasercutter you can also engrave a design into the material which with the right records (composition of the vinyl varies with each label) you get a great effect
  13. This is a project which will have a reasonably lengthy build-up time, so this thread exists purely to gather information, consolidate the design and work methodologies. A little background. I have never built an acoustic or archtop previously to this, so much of this particular thread will consist of my research and references to information online or from books, etc. The Gibson EB-750 and its sister the EB-650 were extremely rare (less than 100) basses built upon the designs of the Gibson ES range. The EB-750 was (as far as I am aware) the same underlying design as ES-175 but with a bass n
  14. I know from a purely logical perspective, for a first build, a bolt-on is best because it will allow for neck shimming, the ability to rebuild the neck or the body if one is messed-up, etc. So, the plan is/was to use non-pretty "left overs" from other furniture, etc. projects. One of these left-overs is a can of DupliColor MetalCast Red Chrome. The idea was to go with the red chrome finish and black hardware and I've already bought the hardware. The conundrum comes in because I love natural finish guitars and it looks like I'll have left-over cherry that's wide enough for the body, but o
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