Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'finish'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Instrument Setup
  • Instrument Building
  • Electronics
  • Finishing/Refinishing
  • Inlay and Binding
  • Repair and Maintenance
  • Tools and Workshop Tips
  • Miscellaneous

Categories

  • Guitar Parts
  • Tools and Consumables
  • The Library

Categories

  • Guitar Anatomy Class
  • Workshop and Tools
  • The Tipshop
  • YouTube

Forums

  • Patreon-only Area
    • Season 1
  • ProjectGuitar.com Forum Guidelines and FAQ
    • Community Guidelines and FAQ
  • ProjectGuitar.com Guitar Of The Month
    • Current Guitar Of The Month Contest
    • Guitar Of The Month entry/poll archive
  • Build Area
    • In Progress and Finished Work
    • The Design Bar
    • Non-Guitar Build Section
  • Tech Area
    • Solidbody Guitar and Bass Chat
    • Acoustic and Hollowbody Guitar Chat
    • Inlays and Finishing Chat
    • Electronics Chat
    • CNC Chat
    • Tools and Shop Chat
  • General Topics
    • Site Feedback, Issue Reporting and Test area
    • Players Corner
    • Put it to a vote
    • The Luthiery Business
    • The Marketplace
  • Forum Tutorials & Reference

Categories

  • Documents
  • Guitar Drawings
    • Component Drawings
    • Instrument Plans

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Location


Interests

Found 12 results

  1. Hi, i used an oil finish on my guitar and the three first coats goes well. I let dry several days between each coats. But since the fourth coat, after 15 days, the surface of the guitar stay sticky. I'm even be able to mark the finish just with little taps with the flat of my nails!!! Do I have to wait longer for drying (the last few weeks have been very wet), reapply oil and wipe off immediately (reactivate the solvent) or sand everything and start again? Thank you for your help!!! Best regards,
  2. Tutorial courtesy of Wade Finch This swirling technique is for oil paint although I think urethane paint will work also - I don’t have any urethane paint to test with so I'll just say oil paint for now. Don’t use “Testers Model” paint! It is too thick and has clear gloss mixed in it, which makes it clot and become messy. Fast dry “PlastiKote” enamel is what I used but I'm always looking for other types of paint to use. There are other oils out there, but I don’t have the time to test them all.... First off you are going to need a large “something” to dip in. I say "something" because you can d
  3. Hey everyone, I'm back after a leave of absence for school! So I'm going to get started on my next project which I will be building a Basswood Guitar kit. Now I know Basswood is a soft wood which is where you guys' help comes in. What is the best way to protect Basswood when painting the body with acrylic paint? I've heard of epoxy or shellac used as an initial coat but I don't know how well acrylic paint would stick to that or whether either of the two finishes will lift the acrylic paint. Would just a few of topcoats of poly be enough to protect the guitar?
  4. Hi In my single-cut bass thread, I mention my usual method of gloss-finishing my basses and guitars, which is wiping on. I recently did a thread on another forum, so forgive me for cutting and pasting, but it is a technique that is probably of interest to any of those of you who might be stuck for facilities or equipment but still want to produce an acceptable (but not perfect....of which more later) finish. But before I start, just a few of the common-sense health and safety precautions: use varnish and thinners in accordance with manufacturers recommendations, especially relating
  5. Hi, I’m building my first own guitar and I bought an unfinished maple guitar neck (neck and fretboard). To finish it, I would like to use tru oil. However, maple fretboard needs to be protected by an waterproof layer to avoid dirty stain on the wood. Tru oil is not a real oil because it became hard but can it provide a sufficient protective layer for maple? If it’s not the case, can apply tru oil just on the neck part and use acrylic or polyurethane lacquer for the fretboard? Personally, I don’t seed any difficulties but perhaps I’m too confident. Has anyone ever done that
  6. I'm currently working on a build for an LP Semi-Hollow Guitar. I was looking around for the finish I want to give it and decided on this. However, I'm not sure what paint Gibson used when they were making this model. Thoughts?
  7. Hi there, I'm completely new to guitar building and have an unfinished custom thinline Tele design body I need to treat and finish. The body is swamp ash and I really want to make good use of the grain patterns and give it a charcoal stain look. I'm aiming for something like the attached photo, if possible. I'm looking for advice for the best way to achieve this and on the stains (brands/colours) to use. If anyone could help me out and point me in the right direction, it'd be much appreciated. Many thanks! Alz
  8. Project guitar Hello ! Thanks for stopping by ! I am building my first electric guitar (thus me being new on projectguitar.com). I will make a review of my build on YouTube or instructables and I'll gladly share it here, but I'm not finished yet! I need your help with the finish. This is my thinline/Nashville tele. I would have had loads of photos to show you but I still haven't figured out the 501 MB file thing for uploading photos.... Here are a few facts about my build : It is made out of two mahogany panels (each made of two pieces) glued one on top of the othe
  9. Start out with your plain holographic material cut down to the approximate size of your guitar's body. This particular finish is easy to do but will require plenty of patience and a massive amount of clear coating. Peel the backing off and slowly roll the material onto your body. It is not necessary for you to start out with a bare wood body - it is much easier to start out with a finished guitar body since the smoother surface allows the adhesive to stick better. You can either rub it down by hand or using a spatula - I prefer by hand myself. Trim around the outside using a brand new bl
  10. I am rebuilding and repainting a Johnson Strat that I have had since is was 7 (know 19). I am going to repaint it but I need some help figuring out what a ertain design is called or how to do it. The design I am looking for almost looks like really little tiger stripes but faded, no solid. I mostly see it on les paul models, or guitars that dont have a scratch guard that covers most of the body. At Guitar Center's website, their les paul page has a picture of a guitar with this print, but I can not find what the print is called. Here is a link to the Website: http://www.guitarcenter.c
  11. The first tools you will need are a pencil or pen, and a piece of paper larger than the guitar body as pictured. I just used notepad paper and some masking tape. If you're working with a material that doesn't have a special pattern to it you can skip over this part and move down to the covering the back. Just follow the same directions for the front of the body. Flip your body face down on the paper and trace around it. Once you have your tracing complete cut it out carefully with a razor blade or Exacto knife. . Keep in mind if you chose to use construction paper to make your template you
  12. Blow Torch Method The most commonly performed burnt finish is made using the ordinary gas blow torch. If you're going to do this method I'd recommend practising on a piece of low-caloric value wood like Basswood or Alder to get your technique down. Low caloric value woods burn quicker than higher ones like Maple, so you quickly get into the habit of not hanging around with the flame! In a pinch and can't find scrap Basswood, then try Poplar or Aspen which have similar properties. Heat Gun Method If the body still has its original finish you can achieve a great random billowing pattern by usi
×
×
  • Create New...