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Found 4 results

  1. The objective of this How-To is to simplify the purchase of your first hand router as a luthier building up their base of tools. Whether you've never used a router before, never had to consider buying one or just want to go into your next purchase with a more informed choice, the next ten minutes will assist you to make an informed straight line choice. What is a hand router? A router is a compact universal motor that spins a rotary cutting tool at high speed, typically 5000RPM - 30'000RPM. In a hand router, the motor is fitted into a portable base to guide the cutter around the workpiece. R
  2. Adhering to some form of best practice is not a necessary pre-requisite of a useful CAD plan. In a non-professional capacity a CAD plan only has to be fit for the purpose it is intended for, rather than following an established set of standards and work templates. That said, giving a passing nod to best practice helps improve the quality and reliability of your plans, personal working methods and raising your game. Google search results for "guitar CAD plan", "guitar dxf download", etc. reveal a hugely varying level of detailing and usefulness. Some "plans" exist as nothing more than
  3. When one thinks of a guitar or a bass, it is easy to think that the number of angles on headstocks, non-flat shapes, radii and sticky-out bits plus various pieces on top of each other would favour 3D; modelling the instrument as a virtual item or set of items. A tangible real-world object often seems more appropriate as one possessing three dimensions. How is it that 2D is still the most appropriate design methodology for the vast majority of instrument design? In many respects, 3D is genuinely useful and definitely relevant for instrument manufacture. As soon as CNC milling becomes part of th
  4. CAD ("Computer Aided Design") in its most basic form is the electronic equivalent of traditional pen-and-paper technical drawing. CAD stores drawn shapes (such as primitive lines, points, curves) as precise mathematical representations or "vectors". Whilst this might seem an overly-simplistic description for anybody familiar with CAD, this description is as true now as it was in the late fifties when the idea was first germinated. That a technical drawing or "mathematical representation of real world metrics" could be electronically stored, transmitted, reproduced, manipulated, merged, transfo
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