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Found 10 results

  1. As I have worked on my “relic obsession” (and make no mistake….it IS an obsession!) One of the biggest challenges that I had was figuring out the best way to get that ambered 'vintage' look. The goal I was shooting for was that of a ’62 Strat neck & the color of the headstock & back of the neck (I wanted to start with a rosewood neck first. I plan on tackling an all maple neck at a later time). The target neck has this cool brownish-goldish-amber finish (that’s quite a mouthful!). I wanted to make it look authentic; not only in color…but REAL vintage necks bring out the grain of the ma
  2. Hi, I’m building my first own guitar and I bought an unfinished maple guitar neck (neck and fretboard). To finish it, I would like to use tru oil. However, maple fretboard needs to be protected by an waterproof layer to avoid dirty stain on the wood. Tru oil is not a real oil because it became hard but can it provide a sufficient protective layer for maple? If it’s not the case, can apply tru oil just on the neck part and use acrylic or polyurethane lacquer for the fretboard? Personally, I don’t seed any difficulties but perhaps I’m too confident. Has anyone ever done that
  3. First you need a nice piece of wood, wide enough to fit the widest part of your neck. The thickness can vary but I usually take a piece of 20mm thick. I usually use fretboard woods of 6mm. Step 1: The most important thing to begin with is shaving the surfaces of the piece of wood to get perfectly flat surfaces. Now shave the sides of the wood to get perfect 90° degree edge. This is important if you’re going to use the sides as a guide for a router. Step 2: Draw a line on the sides of the wood under the angle you want for your headstock I usually take 13° like a Gibson. Now cut the wood in two
  4. Hi. I have a strat with a wilkinson trem which I made some time ago. The E1st string has developed a rattle all the way up ie on each fret , from about fret 10 and it even buzzes loudly on the very last fret. The string is not touching the end of the neck or the pickups. I have put plumbers' tape around every grub screw and thread I caN find gone up & down the neck with 600 grit , a stewmac fret rocker files etc etc - ie there are no high frets underlying the E 1st string. As far as I can tell the frets are seated well. I'm not sure where to look next. I think this
  5. Hello! This is going to be my first attempt at replacing hardware on my guitar. My question is how do I go about finding the specs I need for my guitar? I have the original neck that came with the guitar that I want to replace, so what dimensions or measurements do I need to look at? Any help will will be much appreciated. Thanks.
  6. My question is sort of a complex one: It requires a couple of other questions to answer. A little insight into my build will also aid in determining the answer. I want to hear what other builders/luthiers have to say about how to go about designing and executing an angled bolt on neck for my electric solid body builds. I'm sure there are mixed answers to this, as I have already read a great deal of online resources on the subject, as well as on ProjectGuitar.com That being said, I really do not want to go the route of using angled shims. I am a luthier/shop owner, and want a permanent solutio
  7. Hello all, I'm reading 'da bible' (Melvyn Hiscock's book) at the moment. Pages 94 and 95 mentions a fixture for drilling the truss rod holes in both ends of a bolt on guitar neck. Has anyone ever built this fixture or know where to find some detailed blueprints to make one? I'm trying to figure out how to drill the headstock end properly. Thank you, ken
  8. Hello, to all of you, electronic gurus ! I'm currently working on a "swiss army knife" custom guitar, but I want everything planned out, before actually buying anything critical. (features: tremolo, on-board FFactory clone, coil split, MAYBE a sustainer...) So. I've been hearing that market-available sustainers don't work with a neck pickup, because of interferences. But, I want a sustainer (thanks to the amazing "sustainer ideas", i could do the sustainer system myself, possibly modifying it to fit my demands), and I want my two sh2 and sh4 seymour duncan pickups BUT, I've come acro
  9. Before adjusting anything make sure your guitar is strung up correctly and that your neck has the correct amount of relief and is not excessively bowed or warped. If your neck is bowed you first need to adjust the truss rod and check that the nut is good. If your neck is warped it will require a more extensive repair. Also check that the angle of the tremolo unit is correctly set and not floating at an angle. This would require setting up prior to any work on the rest of the instrument. In general it is recommended that all other avenues of instrument setup are checked before resorting to the
  10. Contrary to what many people believe, a dead straight neck is not the most desirable aspect of an instrument set up for playing. Due to the distance a vibrating string moves (deflection) the neck requires a small amount of upward bow to prevent the strings from buzzing on frets. Adjusting the balance between string tension (which bows the neck upwards into "upbow") and the truss rod resisting (or assisting) this pull, the player can have control over the playability of the instrument. This guide was written from the perspective of setting up a fast-playing instrument with a precise low setup s
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