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Found 15 results

  1. Triton are a distinctly budget-end brand, producing many of the basic power tools and machines a guitar-maker could take advantage of at a very reasonable price point. Their thicknessers, routers, cordless hand tools, etc. all sit within very tempting price ranges that makes one consider whether the saving is worth a potential lack of quality, cheesy looks, performance and end results. Triton is a sub-brand of Powerbox International Ltd. who also control Silverline, GMC and several other brands. The TSPS450 is your typical Far East mass-produced import, not specifically a Triton design; t
  2. Routing binding channels around a flat surface is a basic operation where a router cutter is guided around the target surface with an offset equal to the depth of the channel required. Either the cutter itself has a specifically-undersized guide bearing or the routing fixture holds the workpiece a set distance from the cutter. This operation can be carried out either using a hand router or a router table. Several common supply outlets sell router cutters along with bearing sets for a number of common offset sizes: StewMac Binding Router Bit Set (US)http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Tools/Special_too
  3. Jointing plates - whether it is a decorative top for a solidbody or the soundboard/back for an acoustic - are essential jobs in a guitar workshop. Up until now I have tackled these jobs by clamping a beam to my table top, laying the plate halves on the bench, placing a small baton under the joint and clamping a second beam to snug things up, then apply glue, remove the baton and thus creating enough clamping pressure. This is tedious and time consuming. Enter the LMI plate jointing jig! The jig comes unassembled and is made out of sturdy plywood. The parts have a snug fit although there are so
  4. Our experiences with the Triton TSPS450 oscillating spindle sander were somewhat mixed. It was our opinion that it represented a great tool for the money in spite of it being a simple badged Far Eastern import with cheesy design and less than durable build quality. For the home gamer it would be a great addition to a workshop, as long as it didn't crap out within a few hours like ours did. Also a badged import product, Triton recently introduced the TSPST450 which has almost the exact same specifications as its sibling. Add onto this the tiltable worktop and belt sanding unit it seems a v
  5. The average home gamer often cuts corners that you just wouldn't see in a commercial workshop. I built my first guitars in a converted garage, usually wading out from a sea of sawdust and chips in the evening. For the occasional builder, that's pretty much fine and just part of the whole "beginner-on-a-budget" thing. You clean up later ("maybe later" in my case) and be ready for the next week's chaos/additional sawdust. This loses its charm after a while, what with those peppery Mahogany nose invaders, sneezing, runny eyes, pocket seams permanently contaminated with dust, extended hunts into y
  6. Shaping wood is a visceral and rewarding process, especially when making items which will be felt, handled and appreciated for their physical form and ergonomics. Controlling the final form of the workpiece is an ability that benefits from a patient and intimate relationship between the material, tool and the craftsman. The end product is often all that is seen upon completion rather than the process itself, however that end product always benefits from the care and attention of the process. Commonly, rasps are mass-manufactured and can easily be bought for a few dollars each at the big b
  7. The first slotting box I bought was the basic StewMac version, well over a decade ago. It consisted of little more than an aluminium box with a template locating pin and a couple of chunks of brass to guide my blade. In spite of its simplicity and clunkiness, it worked pretty well. Since my box disappeared (long story) I slotted my boards manually, and my fretwork sometimes suffered because of it. After all, that's what the mitre box was for in the first place; manually hand-sawing slots is a slow and tiring task, needing lots of eye-squinting and concentration. Over the years, designers have
  8. ----==---- Part 1 - Product Rundown Part 2 - Technical Teardown Part 3 - The Router In Use Part 4 - Modifications/Upgrades Part 5 - Review Discussion ----==---- AK: Alright, now that Carl has gone and shown the guts of this little beast, I'll do a little real-world demo. As I said in part one, my main usage of this router is within jigs and templates that I've designed around the use of a guide bushing. For this demonstration, I'll use the wee Makita with a pair of templates: one for a truss rod rout, another for a pair of channels for carbon fiber reinforcements. What better te
  9. ----==---- Part 1 - Product Rundown Part 2 - Technical Teardown Part 3 - The Router In Use Part 4 - Modifications/Upgrades Part 5 - Review Discussion ----==---- CM: Okay, let's do this. A bit of a teardown. Right off the bat you can see on the motor that Makita haven't tried to cut every corner possible, unlike some manufacturers where this is now commonplace. Material codes are visible on a lot of the parts which makes the assessment of suitability easier. The flyout is invaluable reference material.... (click to embiggen) The two halves of the top shell
  10. The Makita RT0700C (recently updated to RT701C) occupies a nice position in the router market alongside its most visible competitors from Bosch and DeWalt. Originally, compact routers such as these were exclusively designed for trimming and shaping the borders of laminates such as kitchen worktops. More recently, the accessories and design of these tools have made them viable alternatives to larger-format hand routers, plus they are a common feature as the spindle in homebrew CNC routers. For guitar work, compact routers are light and nimble enough to work around headstocks and powerful enough
  11. Luthiery shares many aspects with fine woodworking, with several of the hackneyed platitudes ("measure twice cut once!") and process methods being shared. Most of my working time is spent transferring lovingly-calculated measurements from (in my instance, CAD) plans to the workpiece itself. This deserves the best concentration you can sum up and clear application to the job at hand. It's impossible to put that wood back once you've whizzed it up into chips and sent it up the extractor tube and then found out your marking out was at fault! Everything you can pour into the reliability of your pl
  12. Today's luthiers have at their disposal a bewildering array of tools and jigs to perform measurements of their instruments whilst under construction and during set-up. One such tool that has been developed in recent years to help simplify the process of setting up a guitar is a Nut Slot Depth Gauge or String Height Gauge. These tools enable a more accurate and direct measurement of the string height over the first fret by providing a real-time readout of the distance. Traditionally the string height is checked by depressing the string at the third fret and checking the distance between the str
  13. Up until 1973 Gibson's bass bridges were fairly primitive and somewhat fault-prone but still relatively advanced in comparison to those in use by Fender. The introduction of their "three-point" bridge eliminated most of the existing problems of older bar or "two-point" bridges but introduced many of its own quirks. Still in use on modern Gibson and Epiphone basses, the three-point bass bridge is a proven design albeit mired in its traditional roots with much room for improvement. Up until the introduction of the SuperTone, upgrades for Gibson basses were near non-existent. The wide mounting po
  14. I bought the INCRA 150mm T-Rule a few weeks back partially in anticipation of a non-guitar jobs and projects I'm working on but more out of curiosity in how much I could improve my marking up beyond "remembering where I might be adding in tolerances and compensating". I've never been happy squinting at the true end of a ruler or trying to lay a mark perfectly in line with graduations on the side of one. Couple this with fighting against unsharp pencil lines that gravitate into the grain and I pretty much shiver about how much tolerance it is possible to add into workpieces! The T-Rules are one
  15. Have been in the business of making superb instrument hardware for almost thirty years, the Hipshot name is synonymous with refinement, high quality and experience. Most importantly Hipshot maintain friendly two-way customer contact which - being fed back into the products - ultimately makes the products the result of players, luthiers and of course the expertise of guys at Hipshot. Products are manufactured and personally inspected at each and every process rather than dropping off the conveyor into the box. Aside from certain specialised processes such as gold plating, every process from the
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