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Found 10 results

  1. Hot off the press from G&W in Portugal is this compact solution to rough-radiusing fingerboards quickly using your router. Machined from CNC-cut aluminium with a black anodised finish, this jig is designed to be tough and precise like a good shop tool should be. The jig consists of two parts; the sliding router base and a lower sled. The base rides over the top of the sled, indexed off the radiused guides whilst the sled is designed to move back and forth over the fingerboard. The complete jig is available in the most common radii (7.25", 9.5", 10", 12" and 16")
  2. Soapbar pickup routs seem simple in comparison to say, a humbucker or maybe a Tele bridge pickup rout. In actuality, they can be pretty difficult to nail. A soapbar cavity's outline is generally in full view instead of being hidden under a pickup ring, pickguard or the bridge; they need to be 100% perfect as any errors will be on show in the finished instrument. A basic soapbar rout consists of a simple rectangle conforming to the pickup with a small gap around the outline and radiused corners that follow those of the pickup case. This is bread and butter templating work for a router, how
  3. Routing binding channels around a flat surface is a basic operation where a router cutter is guided around the target surface with an offset equal to the depth of the channel required. Either the cutter itself has a specifically-undersized guide bearing or the routing fixture holds the workpiece a set distance from the cutter. This operation can be carried out either using a hand router or a router table. Several common supply outlets sell router cutters along with bearing sets for a number of common offset sizes: StewMac Binding Router Bit Set (US)http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Tools/Special_too
  4. Laser cutting takes what we engineer at the desktop and brings it out into the real world. For a luthier, this enables creating our most common working tools - router templates - to be made simply yet precisely. A real game changer! Translating creative or technical design work into router templates opens up a world of design options. Anything from an accurate outline of your body/headstock, pickup and electronics cavities, through to complete modular templating systems for recessed tremolos, etc. Powerful desktop design tools and laser cutting takes your building to the next creative and tec
  5. Commercially-made routing templates for humbuckers are easy to find from virtually all good luthiery supply outlets these days. They're a fantastic turnkey solution for carrying out this common task. Beyond the "standard" sizes, templates for larger pickups are thin on the ground meaning that we end up making them ourselves. Standard or not, the process of making a template for any humbucker-style pickup is the same and it's not a huge leap to tweak the dimension to fit a variety of pickup sizes such as mini humbuckers, etc. Pickups fitted into pickguards or under a pickup ring don't
  6. The router is one of the most versatile tools in a luthier's arsenal. It can also represent a decent chunk of your tool budget, so making a good choice is critical. Having sampled a few different routers over the last several years, I've gotten a fair idea of what works well and what doesn't. From the Festool OF1400EQ (unibody with perpendicular handle - amazing quality, ridiculously expensive) to the Bosch 1617EVSPK (removable motor with fixed and plunge bases - middling quality and price, miserable plunge depth stop), there is no shortage of candidates out there. While researching possible p
  7. ----==---- Part 1 - Product Rundown Part 2 - Technical Teardown Part 3 - The Router In Use Part 4 - Modifications/Upgrades Part 5 - Review Discussion ----==---- AK: Alright, now that Carl has gone and shown the guts of this little beast, I'll do a little real-world demo. As I said in part one, my main usage of this router is within jigs and templates that I've designed around the use of a guide bushing. For this demonstration, I'll use the wee Makita with a pair of templates: one for a truss rod rout, another for a pair of channels for carbon fiber reinforcements. What better te
  8. ----==---- Part 1 - Product Rundown Part 2 - Technical Teardown Part 3 - The Router In Use Part 4 - Modifications/Upgrades Part 5 - Review Discussion ----==---- CM: Okay, let's do this. A bit of a teardown. Right off the bat you can see on the motor that Makita haven't tried to cut every corner possible, unlike some manufacturers where this is now commonplace. Material codes are visible on a lot of the parts which makes the assessment of suitability easier. The flyout is invaluable reference material.... (click to embiggen) The two halves of the top shell
  9. The Makita RT0700C (recently updated to RT701C) occupies a nice position in the router market alongside its most visible competitors from Bosch and DeWalt. Originally, compact routers such as these were exclusively designed for trimming and shaping the borders of laminates such as kitchen worktops. More recently, the accessories and design of these tools have made them viable alternatives to larger-format hand routers, plus they are a common feature as the spindle in homebrew CNC routers. For guitar work, compact routers are light and nimble enough to work around headstocks and powerful enough
  10. The objective of this How-To is to simplify the purchase of your first hand router as a luthier building up their base of tools. Whether you've never used a router before, never had to consider buying one or just want to go into your next purchase with a more informed choice, the next ten minutes will assist you to make an informed straight line choice. What is a hand router? A router is a compact universal motor that spins a rotary cutting tool at high speed, typically 5000RPM - 30'000RPM. In a hand router, the motor is fitted into a portable base to guide the cutter around the workpiece. R
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