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Found 7 results

  1. It is difficult to construct an electric guitar without reaching for the router. Control and pickup cavities, neck pockets and tremolo recesses are all operations that require the use of this versatile tool, and all of these examples are made much easier and safer by the use of a template and an inverted pattern bit to guide the router around the intended cut. One routing pattern that can be difficult to execute accurately is for a Floyd Rose Original tremolo, particularly the recessed version whereby the arm can be raised or lowered above and below its equilibrium point. The follow
  2. Soapbar pickup routs seem simple in comparison to say, a humbucker or maybe a Tele bridge pickup rout. In actuality, they can be pretty difficult to nail. A soapbar cavity's outline is generally in full view instead of being hidden under a pickup ring, pickguard or the bridge; they need to be 100% perfect as any errors will be on show in the finished instrument. A basic soapbar rout consists of a simple rectangle conforming to the pickup with a small gap around the outline and radiused corners that follow those of the pickup case. This is bread and butter templating work for a router, how
  3. I am reaching the final stages of my guitar body and everything was looking pretty good. My neck pocket is so comfortable that it almost squeaks - it holds the weight of the neck on its own. Unfortunately, I have just discovered that it is about 3mm too shallow and given the shape of the body, there isn't much of a platform to rest the router on. I kept the offcuts to hold the body on my Workmate when I did the pickup routing but I routed the neck pocket when the body was just a short plank of wood. Actually, I wouldn't mind any neck pocket routing tips because this is the single gre
  4. My question is sort of a complex one: It requires a couple of other questions to answer. A little insight into my build will also aid in determining the answer. I want to hear what other builders/luthiers have to say about how to go about designing and executing an angled bolt on neck for my electric solid body builds. I'm sure there are mixed answers to this, as I have already read a great deal of online resources on the subject, as well as on ProjectGuitar.com That being said, I really do not want to go the route of using angled shims. I am a luthier/shop owner, and want a permanent solutio
  5. Commercially-made routing templates for humbuckers are easy to find from virtually all good luthiery supply outlets these days. They're a fantastic turnkey solution for carrying out this common task. Beyond the "standard" sizes, templates for larger pickups are thin on the ground meaning that we end up making them ourselves. Standard or not, the process of making a template for any humbucker-style pickup is the same and it's not a huge leap to tweak the dimension to fit a variety of pickup sizes such as mini humbuckers, etc. Pickups fitted into pickguards or under a pickup ring don't
  6. I've been inspired by the work of Chris Verhoven and David Myka, especially in the semi hollowbody realm. My current build is a chambered ash body and a 1/4 in maple cap. I've been trying to cut the f holes in the maple, but the sharp corners are proving to be extremely difficult. How have others done something like this in the past to achieve uniform, smooth, and sharp looking results? This was extremely hard and I'm not very proud of it. https://lh6.googleus...-p-k/2013-02-12
  7. This text is the literary accompaniment to this YouTube instructional video: The first thing to keep in mind when building a template is to ensure that you have a full-scale drawing/blueprint of the guitar you wish to make templates for. There’s nothing worse than making a template only to find out it won’t work for you… or even worse, building the guitar from that template! So check, and recheck all your measurements and drawings to make sure you’ve got it all right. To build a quality template you’re going to need a couple of tools and a short list of materials. For the actual templates yo
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