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Found 6 results

  1. First you need a nice piece of wood, wide enough to fit the widest part of your neck. The thickness can vary but I usually take a piece of 20mm thick. I usually use fretboard woods of 6mm. Step 1: The most important thing to begin with is shaving the surfaces of the piece of wood to get perfectly flat surfaces. Now shave the sides of the wood to get perfect 90° degree edge. This is important if you’re going to use the sides as a guide for a router. Step 2: Draw a line on the sides of the wood under the angle you want for your headstock I usually take 13° like a Gibson. Now cut the wood in two
  2. "Vintage style" truss rods are highly effective whether they are configured as a bending rod or simply as a compression rod. In spite of many alternative designs working around their shortcomings, the original is still often regarded as the best by many builders. Whilst I won't be weighing in on that lengthy debate, from practical standpoint "simple, inexpensive and effective" are worth the cost of entry alone. This article was written to be a suitable blend of comprehensiveness and brevity....if you remain unsure about certain areas, leave comments below or ask over in the forums. O
  3. The single-acting compression style truss rod is simple and easy to fabricate. They are not without their disadvantages however. Fundamentally, a compression rod relies on the wood it is mounted in to remain stable. Wood fibres respond to shifts in relative atmospheric humidity by absorbing or losing water; metal does not. Changes in the moisture content of wood subtly alter its dimensions, and consequently the truss rod will react with these dimensional changes. As neck wood gains moisture it expands, increasing compression of the wood between the truss rod anchor points as it pushes out
  4. The truss rod is a simple device both in operation and action, however it's understandable why there seems to be a little mystery and confusion about them; they're hidden deep in the neck, under a truss rod cover, out of sight and out of mind. Most people "set and forget", sometimes for decades! As builders, it's of paramount importance that we know exactly how and why truss rods work as they do, and the comparative differences between the different types. If we don't, we're unable to fully predict or take advantage of their effects. Why do we need them in the first place? What problem do
  5. Hello all, I'm reading 'da bible' (Melvyn Hiscock's book) at the moment. Pages 94 and 95 mentions a fixture for drilling the truss rod holes in both ends of a bolt on guitar neck. Has anyone ever built this fixture or know where to find some detailed blueprints to make one? I'm trying to figure out how to drill the headstock end properly. Thank you, ken
  6. Contrary to what many people believe, a dead straight neck is not the most desirable aspect of an instrument set up for playing. Due to the distance a vibrating string moves (deflection) the neck requires a small amount of upward bow to prevent the strings from buzzing on frets. Adjusting the balance between string tension (which bows the neck upwards into "upbow") and the truss rod resisting (or assisting) this pull, the player can have control over the playability of the instrument. This guide was written from the perspective of setting up a fast-playing instrument with a precise low setup s
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