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Haze/stain After Wet Sanding Clear Coat.


mbaker
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I had some scratches and nicks on a body that had already been finished. I filled the scratches and nicks with clear coat touch up from auto-store (just like I always had). I used 600 and 2000 grit wet paper to sand down the clear coat touch-ups flush to the original finish. Then used buffing compound on a wrag to buff out the scratches.

However this time, I noticed a light solid haze where I had wet sanded. It is light and can be seen when you look at the guitar with the reflection of your light source just next the haze on the guitar. It doesn't seem to be swirl marks as I have tried to use buffing compound and Stew Macs swirl remover with no luck????

The haze appears to have taken the shape of the water from wet sanding. (i.e. some potions that were not sanded but had water on it have this haze).

Is this some kind of water stain or reaction with the clear coat I used to fill the nicks. Any suggestions on how to correct his would be appreciated?

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Usually haze in a finish is the work of moisture in the clear coat. Its commonly reffered to as "blushing".

What to do? If you see blushing, Stop.  Blushing can also be removed through sanding. It can also be removed by spraying the finish with straight lacquer thinner. (Some finishers add a small amount of retarder to the thinner). If the moisture is trapped deeply in the finish you made need to use a product called "Blush Eraser". Blush Eraser reconstitutes the lacquer to allow the moisture to escape. Behlen makes the most popular eraser and provides it in an aerosol. 

"After spraying the first few lacquer coats I've noticed hundreds of small pin

Thats from reranch. Its reffereing to the spraying process, but im pretty sure you can try the blush eraser to fix this.

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What blush eraser is is retarder in a can. Behlen blush eraser is a necessity if you live in an area like the mid-atlantic where the humidity is always up.

You should just keep a can around.

How it works is it redisolves the finish and keeps it redissolved for long enough for the water to float to the surface and evaporate.

At least that what the folks who sell it claim.

I personally think that it's magic and they just don't want to tell us.

It's great to come in first thing in the morning to get something that has to go out that morning and find it with a thick opaque haze. The first time you hit it with eraser and it goes clear you want to run back and kiss whoever sold it to you.

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How would I go about applying Behlen blush eraser? Just quickly spray the affected area? Is over spray on other areas OK or should I create a stencil to limit the over spray on other areas?

Also, do you think this can cause any other damage or problems? I am a little nervous to do this as the problem is not severe and is only visible when the light is reflecting just right on the finish; I do not want to make things any worse? I suppose I test it on the back of the guitar?

FYI - I sanded 2 areas with wet 2000 paper and the problem occurred. I just sanded another section with same paper and no water, and the problem did not occur? Does this make sense.... I'm surprised the finish is so susceptible to water damage from sanding?

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is the finish you're dealing with laquer? be sure if it is before doing anything.

Honestly it sounds like you've maybe got hard water if it's stained. Maybe mineral deposits. Try sanding again with the 2000 dry if it worked in one area as you say.

My first thought was that you didn't buff it enough. It's rare that you can hand buff with a compound to the same gloss as the rest of the guitar will have. ESPECIALLY if you used 600 to start with and then went straight to 2000. You will still have 600 grit scratches in there which will look hazy.

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is the finish you're dealing with laquer? be sure if it is before doing anything. 

Honestly it sounds like you've maybe got hard water if it's stained. Maybe mineral deposits.  Try sanding again with the 2000 dry if it worked in one area as you say.

My first thought was that you didn't buff it enough.  It's rare that you can hand buff with a compound to the same gloss as the rest of the guitar will have.  ESPECIALLY if you used 600 to start with and then went straight to 2000.  You will still have 600 grit scratches in there which will look hazy.

I was going to say that too. I remeber on my EVH, there was a white haze in some areas, and the paintjob was very scratch from not properly buffing it. I just re-buffed it, and the haze disapeared.

DSC01032.jpg

Not bad :D Try resanding the whole body and buffing it with a buffing pad. I really like them. I tried doing it by hand, and i never got all the scratches out. With a buffing pad you can buff for a while without getting tired. Hell, it shines better too!

Edited by AlGeeEater
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