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Acrylic, Acrylic Urethane, Urethane, Polyurethane Clear.


kelow
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I've searched the forum but haven't the answer... What are the differences between clear coats mentioned in title of this topic?

I always used 2K automotive clear and in data sheet they say it's acrylic. But I asked few people about types of clear yesterday (was trying to buy polyurethane instead of acrylic). They said that we say it's acrylic clear but actually it's polyurethane. Now I'm confused...

What would you say?

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I've searched the forum but haven't the answer... What are the differences between clear coats mentioned in title of this topic?

I always used 2K automotive clear and in data sheet they say it's acrylic. But I asked few people about types of clear yesterday (was trying to buy polyurethane instead of acrylic). They said that we say it's acrylic clear but actually it's polyurethane. Now I'm confused...

What would you say?

The basic components to any of these clears are resin, solvent and sometimes a catalyst. The resin is the hard layer (the "solids") that remains after the solvent flashes off (evaporates), and if you're using a 2-part clear then the catalyst is what you're adding in order to get the resin to cure hard (chemically). The solvent is there just to thin it out, and of course you can thin it out more with addition of the same (or compatible) solvent.

So the differences between these are that the name (acrylic, polyurethane, polyester, nitro, etc) refers to the chemical component that makes up the resin. They are not all compatible with all solvents, so check with the manufacturer about appropriate thinners (naptha, lacquer thinner, xylene, MEK, etc). Use the good stuff to thin your finish, and the cheap stuff to clean your equipment.

FWIW I'd go by the data sheet.....sounds they the "they" in "they said" aren't what sure what "they" are talking about.

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I asked some House Of Kolor people about it and they said its all technically a polyeurethane since every manufacturer blends resins, binders, etc... (poly meaning many) John Kosmoski, founder of HOK, often calls their products a poly, confusing the automotive guys who don't wear masks.

The difference is somewhat in marketing and just industry terminology. Automotive Uros, or 2k are called such because they are formulated to work and act different than the stuff you buy at Homie Depot for furniture. And I don't know of a retail sold 2 part poly for wood.

This is even further skewed by there being no conisistent use of the term from industry to industry or manufacturer to manufacturer. Company A might call thiers something different than company B to seem edgy and new and kewl. It is both fascinating an boring if you get kustom painters talking about this, they can go on for days if there's plenty of beer on hand.

Not being a chemist I just want to know what will work and how to apply it. Thus is stick with complete systems and follow the tech sheets.

Then people Uros and Enamel aren't compatible but every pinstriper loves their One Shot, which is an enamel.

What's really great is all this is about to change as California keeps toughening the enviormental restrictions and oil gets more expensive, the industry will shift to water based paint as Europe did a long time ago. This years new rules in California had the industry freaked but the dust appears to be settling...

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