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Fattening A Single-coil Sound


GregP
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Hey all,

I don't remember the name of it, but there's a 'booster'-type pedal that became available within the last 2 years. Nothing innovative, but basically it allowed you to use your single-coil equipped guitar to get semi-humbuckery sounds.

I don't need a level/gain boost, since that can all be done on the input. I'm wondering if anyone has ideas on what else can make a single-coil sound more humbuckery...

A little bit of cuts on the highs, but that still won't quite get you there. It's not exactly an 'eq' thing, though I'm sure certain EQ would help. It's about the 2 different 'nodes' picked up by the individual coils of the humbucker, more than anything....

I don't know. I'm at a loss for anything useful.

Greg

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It's not exactly an 'eq' thing, though I'm sure certain EQ would help. It's about the 2 different 'nodes' picked up by the individual coils of the humbucker, more than anything....
No, most of it is an EQ thing - humbuckers have a much lower resonant frequency ( since they're two coils in series). That's what the SD SFX-01 Pickup Booster does, and it does a pretty dead-on humbucker impersonation. If you need to get the harmonic "smear" from dual nodes cancelling some out-of-phase high harmonics, you'll need two coils. Might as well use a humbucker. :D
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Fair enough. It's to be a software plug-in, though, so it's not like I'm able to advise people to just get humbuckers instead. :D

It seems you're correct about the resonant frequency, though. I'll look into that, which will possibly be the key to the whole thing. I wonder how the frequency smear could be emulated. I'm sure it's possible, though it might require some work.

While I'm at it, I'm wondering what the best way to try to cut the noise of a single-coil would be. Notching at 60Hz doesn't actually work the way one would think. :D Perhaps an algorithm similar to that used by 'noise reduction' software... you take a 'fingerprint' of the noisy signal (ie. without any notes being played, just the noise floor) and then subtract it from the incoming (ie WITH notes) signal.

Probably not usable in realtime, but it might make a handy per-track effect.

Greg

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I'm sorry, I didn't realize what you were trying to do, so my comments only apply to analog, realtime performance - in the digital domain, nearly all things are possible, especially if you don't have to do it in realtime. The noise reduction is probably the most complex problem, but again, if it doesn't have to operate in realtime, a good programmer should be able to figure it out.

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