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Clear Coat


JOAMdude
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you gota be a little more specific.. by semi gloss do you mean just a satin shine and not a mirror finish? IM also assuming that you want it to be a wood finish and not a painted one by your context. I usually dont clear coat wood finish guitars, i go with danish oil so it still looks like wood, and not a piece of plastic.

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you gota be a little more specific.. by semi gloss do you mean just a satin shine and not a mirror finish? IM also assuming that you want it to be a wood finish and not a painted one by your context. I usually dont clear coat wood finish guitars, i go with danish oil so it still looks like wood, and not a piece of plastic.

this is the exact finish im going for

http://beatstreetmusic.com/images/NJCMGNM_1.jpg

so i would prep the wood, use danish oil, seal, then clear coat?

Edited by Maiden69
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you gota be a little more specific.. by semi gloss do you mean just a satin shine and not a mirror finish? IM also assuming that you want it to be a wood finish and not a painted one by your context. I usually dont clear coat wood finish guitars, i go with danish oil so it still looks like wood, and not a piece of plastic.

this is the exact finish im going for

http://beatstreetmusic.com/images/NJCMGNM_1.jpg

so i would prep the wood, use danish oil, seal, then clear coat?

Um, that's a high gloss clear finish if I ever saw one. Nothing semi-gloss about it. Sand to 320 or 400 grit, pop the grain with shellac (dewaxed, liberon seal coat should do the trick) wiped on with a paper towel, shoot clears of your choice, and buff your little heart out. Danish oil under lacquer is sometimes possible with a lot of waiting and sealing to prevent things touching each other, but it's not advisable.

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Grain filling is only necessary if you are going to apply clear coats of laquer (as in that picture). Of course, it also depends on the type of wood. If it is a tight grain like alder or maple, grain filling may not be necessary; however, woods such as mahogany, ash, walnut, etc. will require it.

CMA

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