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Cleaning Gluing Surfaces With Acetone ?


VesQ
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I´ve been cleaning a couple of ebony fretboards before gluing with acetone. Does this stuff have any negative effect on Titebond and how good joint will be ? The reason I´m asking cause I removed one of those fretboards and it came off a little bit too easy, I think.

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hes trying to remove the oils from interfering with the glue; i guess;

pointless i think, because the glue dries faster than returning oils, you just have to give it a quik sand (thickness or 180 something that sands without deviating the flatness)

acetone ive seen used for slow curing finishes on oily woods (cocobolo) but never for gluing

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Uh, no, it isn't.

BEST glue surface is a planed one. Smooth. Straight off the plane.

Then comes a scraped one.

Then comes a sanded one.

The only exception to this is epoxy, which works differently from most other woodworking glues (like titebond, hot hide glue, other wood glues, polyurethane) in that it likes a bit of tooth, preferably some wood roughed up with 80 grit or similar (yes, coarse). And poly glues like a little water added (catalyzes the reaction, slightly damp rag across the joint before applying glue).

I've yet to use a wood that gave me problems with gluing with titebond, and I've never wiped with acetone. Not on any of the ebony boards I've used, or any of the (indian) rosewood. I'll be doing a few tests with Cocobolo when I get around to building with it, which is by far more resinous/oily, and some wipe with acetone before gluing that, but from past discussions, there seems to be about a 60/40 split in favour of not doing anything.

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Uh, no, it isn't.

BEST glue surface is a planed one. Smooth. Straight off the plane.

Then comes a scraped one.

Then comes a sanded one.

The only exception to this is epoxy, which works differently from most other woodworking glues (like titebond, hot hide glue, other wood glues, polyurethane) in that it likes a bit of tooth, preferably some wood roughed up with 80 grit or similar (yes, coarse). And poly glues like a little water added (catalyzes the reaction, slightly damp rag across the joint before applying glue).

I've yet to use a wood that gave me problems with gluing with titebond, and I've never wiped with acetone. Not on any of the ebony boards I've used, or any of the (indian) rosewood. I'll be doing a few tests with Cocobolo when I get around to building with it, which is by far more resinous/oily, and some wipe with acetone before gluing that, but from past discussions, there seems to be about a 60/40 split in favour of not doing anything.

+1

I get great results strait off my hand plane with no wiping of acetone. I've done a few cocobolo fingerboards on cocobolo necks that way and they are holding strong two years later.

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I remember FWW did an article on bonding wood with various surface preparation, Smooth rough etc. I believe the result was a 120 grit surface was best for strength using yellow glue. I am not trying to annoy anyone here just passing on some info I read on tests that were performed by someone else.

I think it is up to you to figure out why your glue bond failed. Glue on both sides does help with yellow glue.

Acetone should work but I suggest Mineral Spirits since it will not remove any oils in the wood but it does dry slowly. Would Acetone hurt the bond; NO if you believe it caused the bonding problems. One thing about ebony and rosewood is they have a certain amount of oil in the wood, over time if the instrument is not taken care off these oils dry out the wood rots (dry rot). With other materials with very high oil contents you have to remove the oil (waxy surface) so the wood will bond to other woods and Acetone is a viable product.

Polyurethane happens to be the easiest bond of all glues to break and I highly recommend it be left for outdoor use or special hard to bond surfaces. Epoxy is also a hard glue to use and I don't believe adds any additional strength. In most cases it causes more problems than it solves. Yellow glue in any form brand, color, is the industry standard and so far I have not seen a suitable replacement. I would also not use the newer type III waterproof yellow glues unless you need to use your guitar as a paddle or play only in the rain. Probably costs more to boot.

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