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Neck Pocket Angle?


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Ok i went on Warmoth and was looking at the tune o matic bridges and it say you need a 1.5 to 3 degree angle of the neck pocket to use a tune o matic bridge. My question is that are there any tune o matic bridges that you dont have to do that and if not, how would you do that.

Each set of plans shows the neck angle for that particular guitar. Fender types have almost no angle, Gibson types have more. I've built Gibson types with a 3 and a 4 degree angle. Check out your plan, see what neck angle you have and go from there. If it doesn't say, you will have to measure it from the plan.

If you are designing your own, you will have to choose and draw the angle in. I find it's easier to make a neck pocket if the top of the guitar has a top that is carved/angled to match the angle of the neck, like a Les Paul. That way when you cut your neck pocket, you can follow the top of the guitar and get the correct angled slot automatically. Less screwing around that way.

Another way to figure this out, if you have the dimensions of the bridge and the guitar is alreay put together -or drawn is you can put a long straight edgle along the fingerboard, with a shim under it to give you a line where the strings would be. You can measure where the strings would land at the bridge. Then it's simple to take that measurement and make sure the bridge that you buy is adjustable to that height.

-john

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  • 2 years later...
Ok i went on Warmoth and was looking at the tune o matic bridges and it say you need a 1.5 to 3 degree angle of the neck pocket to use a tune o matic bridge. My question is that are there any tune o matic bridges that you dont have to do that and if not, how would you do that.

The short answer is no. The tune-o-matic bridge is just taller than a typical strat-style bridge. It is what it is.

If you really wanted to, you could recess the tune-o-matic into the body but you'd have to take care to keep the intonation screws above the surface of the body.. or carve out access behind the bridge. It'd be an enormous pain to intonate if you had to pull the bridge each time you wanted to adjust a saddle.

I haven't done this myself but I've considered for the kid's guitars. sometimes you need to make some compromises when all you've got is full sized hardware on a 21" scale guitar. I found some slightly narrow bridges on eBay but they're basically sitting on their bellies to get them low enough. I don't want my little les pauls to be strung up like a violin (bridge height).

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